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‘I am HIV-Positive. So What?’: This New Book can Boost Morale for HIV-Positive People

The book is based on the life of an international bodybuilding champion Khundrakpam Pradipkumar Singh hailing from Manipur

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HiV Aids symbol is a red ribbon. Wikimedia
  • “I am HIV-Positive, So What?” is a book written by Jayanta Kalita, a journalist 
  • The book has been published by Bloomsbury publications
  • It talks about the struggles of HIV-Positive people to stay in the society and not be sidelined

New Delhi, August 19, 2017: In a society where HIV patients are very often forced into seclusion, a new book titled “I Am HIV-Positive, So What?” promises to raise new hopes among the silent sufferers.

The book, authored by journalist Jayanta Kalita and published by Bloomsbury, was launched on Friday at an event organised at the Press Club of India here.

The book is based on the life of an international bodybuilding champion Khundrakpam Pradipkumar Singh hailing from Manipur, who was diagnosed HIV-positive.

“His mission was to break the stereotype that an HIV person cannot be part of society. Even after his HIV status becoming public through the media, Singh remained undaunted in the face of all odds,” Kalita said at the event.

The book speaks of the incredible journey of the HIV-positive person, who mended his failing health, overcame psychological trauma, and fought stigma and discrimination to pursue his dreams.

“He was determined to excel in his chosen field despite warnings from doctors and adverse comments from the society,” the author added. (IANS)

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Sexism is Real and Men Face it too!

While women tend to pay heed to such remarks, sexism directed towards men goes largely unnoticed. Read on to know if you have been making sexist remarks towards your male counterparts

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Sexism is unbridled in the Indian society and (finally) being talked about. Pixabay

New Delhi, September 9, 2017 : Society has a huge role to play in the person that we become. And sometimes, that may not be the right way to go about it.

More often than not, society forces us to be somebody we are not. A woman belongs in the kitchen, a man is not supposed to cry; who established these ground rules to function in the society?

Sexism is real, and men face it too (surprise!)

“Man up!”

“Don’t be such a girl!”

Men are always expected to display vigor and anger; their insecurities are rarely taken into account and would rather be pushed under a rug that the society largely identifies as ‘masculinity’.

We keep reminding men that they should not wear pink, that they cannot cry, and that they are only supposed to express their emotions in a certain way. We tell them to ‘not be such a girl’, to shake off their fears and ‘man up’ and to always take charge. And this never stops.

But what we are forgetting here is that men have emotions too; even when the society does not allow them to emote explicitly.

These expressions and understanding are so entrenched in daily communiqué that sometimes we fail to realize when we are making a sexist remark.

Yes, sexism is unbridled in the Indian society and (thankfully) being talked about.

While women tend to pay heed to such remarks, sexism directed towards men goes largely unnoticed.

Here are a few subtle hints to how sexism has become a part of everyday life for men,

sexism
According to the National Crime Victimization Survey 2016, 38 % victims of sexual violence were men.

Men are often faced with questions like “why didn’t you fight her?”, and made jokes on how they must have enjoyed it because why wouldn’t anybody enjoy a sexual encounter that essentially has ‘no strong attached’.

People in the 21st century fail to realize the real, societal damage that women who sexually assault men, cause to the society.

 

 

sexism
The society largely looks down upon the men who earn less than their ‘weaker’ counterparts.

The man is supposed to be the ‘provider’ of the family, earning most of the money. For many men, it feels like a hard slap when women earn more money.

Because if they aren’t earning a living for their family, how can they be a “true” man?

 

 

sexism
The society places unnecessary expectations on boys from a young age. Boys can only be ‘strong’, and ‘big’. Why cant they be sensitive and soft?

Sexism places men and women in stereotypical roles- women are ‘naturally’ kind, compassionate and sensitive, while the men are ‘naturally’ more rational, and stronger, physically and mentally.

 

 

Sexism
There is no denying that girls are body shamed,;but assuming that they are ‘weak’ and hence not self-sufficient is taking that to the next level.

People say this to boys all the time and must be immediately stopped because it increasingly encourages the mindset that girls are inherently weak.

Even when the tone of such sexist comments is compassionate- sometimes even flattering, they are indicative of a stereo-typically narrow and insulting worldview.

 

 

Sexism
Not only is it unnatural to discourage men from undertaking work that they are passionate about, it is also dangerous.

Despite the cliche that art is a universal language, artists are interpreted very differently in terms of their gender. The unease and suspicion that accompany a male artist, irrespective of what art form he practices, are often based out of society’s view of the body and a larger understanding of ‘masculinity’.

 

 

Sexism
Suggesting that boys and girls should be held to different behaviors is dowright demeaning, not to ignore dangerous.

The dominant idea about what a ‘real’ man should be include behaviors such as dominance, control, assertiveness, and emotional unresponsiveness. The society continues to think that men ‘do not do work’, but instead they ‘get work done’ by their weaker counterparts-the women.

While circumstances continue to evolve for the better, in the larger society, there still is a special place in the society  for men who get angry- they are looked upon with reverence. No one points out their anger issues, or frowns upon them. It seems like arrogance and aggression are the only two emotions that men can acceptably show; that these are the only emotions that a man today is capable of showing.

We need to understand that men no longer have to ‘man up’. Instead, let them be a little more human


 

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Renowned Scientist Dr. Pushpa Mitra Bhargava Expires at his Prashant Nagar Residence in Uppal

This Indian scientist was internationally identified as a thinker, institution builder, and molecular biologist

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Dr Pushpa Mitra Bhargava expired on Tuesday. Twitter
  • Dr. Pushpa Mitra Bhargava died on Tuesday after a brief illness
  • He was born in Ajmer on February 22, 1928, and had completed his Ph. D. from Lucknow University
  • He was internationally recognized as an institution builder, molecular biologist, and thinker.

Hyderabad, August 2, 2017: Pushpa Mitra Bhargava, the founder and director of the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) and a top Indian scientist died due to a brief illness on Tuesday.

As per his family members, Bhargava took his last breath at his Prashant Nagar residence in Uppal. He was 89 years-old and had a son and a daughter.

He was born on February 22, 1928, in Ajmer, and had completed his Ph. D. in synthetic chemistry from Lucknow University. Bhargava in 1953 went to the USA and filled in at the post of a project associate at a lab for research on cancer. He had a dynamic part in the revelation of 5-fluorouracil, which is an anti-cancer medication. He was employed at various research organizations in France and the United Kingdom. He had restricted the endorsement of GM in India and asked for a ban of no less than 15 years on hereditarily altered yields in the nation.

Also read: Indian Origin Scientist Part of Team that developed Asteroid flyby to help NASA test Global Tracking Network

His efforts and vision gave rise to the establishment of CCMB in 1977, an institute for basic biology research and seeking its application for the betterment of society.

The staff of CCMB expressed their condolence and profound sadness at his demise. He was a part of the production of nation building scientists who established Indian science. This Indian scientist was recognized as an institution builder, molecular biologist, and thinker at an international level.

His concerns and engagements covered art and culture as well as science and their link to society. He remained immensely engrossed in social issues, especially those related to the effect of science on society in India and the world. His extraordinary commitment and energy will continue to always motivate scientists in future ventures, said an official press release.

Bhargava is also the receiver of more than 100 national and international awards, including the Padma Bhushan, which is the third highest civilian award of the nation in 1986.  He was amid 100 scientists who had conveyed distress over “the ways in which science and reason were getting eroded” and “climate of intolerance” in a statement.

[sociallocker][/sociallocker]

Bhargava had communicated worry over “RSS people” going to a meeting of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) labs. He had cautioned that if the present pattern proceeded, India would not remain a democracy and turn into a theocratic nation like Pakistan.

He had additionally blamed Narendra Modi for expressing that India had known the procedure of organ transplantation long back at Indian Science Congress.

-prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter: @Hkaur1025

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The Dangerous Ideology behind Communism: Why is it a Delusion?

Read how the dangerous and radical ideology of Communism led to some of the darkest moments in the 20th century.

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Dangerous ideology of communism
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, the greatest critique of Soviet communism. Wikimedia
  • In search of a utopian state, communism was born and instantly attracted a number of followers
  • The dangerous ideology was put to test in the 20th century in places like China, Cambodia and the Soviet Union
  • It is important to learn from the horrors of the 20th century that communism is not the answer to a perfect state, rather, far from it

June 14, 2017: In 1848 the ‘Communist Manifesto’ was published that propounded the dangerous ideology of Communism. Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels discovered that they had the same thoughts which resulted in the emergence of this political-economic idea.

Communism rapidly grew in popularity, partly because it is the easiest idea to sell to the poor. The ideology seeks a transition “from each according to their abilities; to each according to their needs”. Simply put, everything should be divided equally between everyone.

Many cultures and countries tried to implement communism in the 20th century and we often do not realize the severe consequences of how that turned out. The totalitarian regimes that were in pursuit of a virtuous society were brutal and that is an understatement. They had no regard for human life.

China, Cambodia, Cuba, Soviet Union, all tried communism. The kind of misery that the civilians of these countries underwent is horrific to read. We take North Korea, for example, as a joke today but the situation there is adverse.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, an incredible critique of the Soviet Communism, estimates 66 million people murdered by Joseph Stalin. Even higher up is Mao Zedong of 80 million people. These numbers are no joke. Hitler killed 6 million people and we talk about it but nobody ever talks about what happened in the Soviet Union or China.

The reason for that could be because communism touches the compassionate people deeply. It feels good to be fair and equal. But here is the thing about communist ideology and the leftist ideology at large- what feels good doesn’t necessarily do good. However, it is immoral to steal from others and that’s what communism is- in theory as well as in practice.

Why is Communism a delusion? Click To Tweet

In an attempt to establish a utopian state, millions of lives were taken. Families either starved to death or froze to death in the Soviet camps.

The Soviet Union collapsed because of the weak economy. Agreed, Glasnost and Perestroika were the final blow, but the basic reason was backwardness of the nation. While the United States and other capitalist countries enjoyed prosperity and better standards of living, the Soviet Union was poor and struggling.

Communists argue that what happened in those places actually wasn’t communism at all. That is an arrogant argument. We cannot risk another 100 million lives to give communism ‘another chance’.

It is unnerving to think that so many people are falling prey to the communist ideology. One out of Five Social Scientist is a communist! They subscribe to the hammer and sickle symbol of communism.

Dangerous ideology of communism
Hammer and Sickle, a sign of Communism. Wikimedia

It should be understood that communism is based on force, while the capitalist world that we live and criticize so often, is based on consent. Consensual transactions result in the benefit of both the parties and there is nothing wrong about that. It is rightly said that communists do not think about uplifting the poor people as much as they seek to bring down the rich. 

Communism does not reward an individual’s hard work and labor. And consequently, when there are no rewards, there is simply no efforts to succeed or do well. What is the point when everybody is equal?

Part of the reason that the United States has done tremendously well and is a great power because it favors free markets (capitalism). It is only in a free market economy that innovation and choices emerge. Capitalism improves the standard of living and brings prosperity to the nation by rewarding individuals for their labor.

Milton Friedman, one of the greatest modern economists, had said “This world runs of individuals pursuing their self-interests. The great achievements of civilization have not come from government bureaus. The only cases in which the masses have escaped from poverty is in cases where they have had capitalism and free trade. The record of history is absolutely crystal clear that there is no alternative way so far discovered of improving a lot of the ordinary people than free enterprise”. 

Today, when communism should be absolutely irrelevant, many people still advocate it. The emergence of libertarian philosophy is a mirror copy of communism. Putting either ideology into policy would result in a catastrophe.

Communism is a delusion. It is a radical transformation in the individual if they decide to apply it. It constructs an illusion that makes the individual perceive he is doing the right thing but in reality, it is just a radical and extreme measure that puts the societal order at risk.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394