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Smart phone era ends, its time for Intelligent Phones

The mode of communication changed altogether with the arrival of mobile phones in our lives. It got wider and more meaningful once the world was exposed to smartphones.

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Intelligent phones
Many phones that are launched recently are more than a smartphone. Flickr
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The mode of communication changed altogether with the arrival of mobile phones in our lives. It got wider and more meaningful once the world was exposed to smartphones.

However, changing technology parameters and fundamentals are calling for yet another disruption in the communication space — this time with Intelligent Phones.

Smart is not necessarily intelligent but intelligent is always smart. By this definition, today’s smartphones are not necessarily intelligent devices.

Here is why:-

A smartphone lets us do myriad of things in ways that bring efficiency, effectiveness and productivity in our lives — such as workplace communication.

With smartphones, we have been able to not only manage e-mails promptly but also connect seamlessly with people and friends on real-time platforms like WhatsApp that are more informal but quick and effective means to make critical decisions in a highly-competitive world.

Now, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is set to play an integral role in making the smartphones of the future.

Algorithm-based intelligence has already begun to percolate in premium smartphones. As adoption and usage evolve, AI will soon become a rudimentary thing in smartphones.

However, the present approach is about finding areas where AI has usage as stand-alone technology and for convenience, integrating it with smartphones makes it user-friendly. This, however, is not going to make the smartphone intelligent; it will only make them super or extra-smart — capable of doing more things.

An Intelligent Phone, however, is one which will have “thinking” capabilities and decide the next course based on the user’s preferences and priorities.

For instance, we now have several advanced capabilities in smartphones — but there are manual interventions that we, as users, have to apply, like enabling and disabling network capabilities. Why shouldn’t the smartphone be intelligent enough to decide which network capability to enable or disable based on usage?

Right now, if Wi-Fi is enabled, the cellular data goes into hibernation. Why can’t the phone decide which one to use based on several criteria like cost of data, application being used, type of data being accessed and so on?

If a user gets into a car, the smartphone should be intelligent enough to decipher through AI and connect to the audio system via Bluetooth. Similarly, the airplane mode should be enabled while someone is airborne.

All these may sound too basic as capabilities. These will not only bring comfort for the user but also have implications on battery consumption as well as in ensuring that there are no “loopholes” enabled which may not be in use in the device.

Smartphones have focused primarily on the applications and features they can support. It has not evolved to communicate better with the user as per his or her preferences and priorities.

One hindrance was the evolutionary phase of AI; but since AI has now become a reality, the device should add intelligence and move beyond applications and functionality. As the smartphone industry looks for innovation in a market that is near its saturation point, the Intelligent Phone could be a saviour for the industry. It could rejuvenate consumer interest and, hence, the market itself.

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New AI Model by Google Can Help Detect Diabetic Retinopathy

For this purpose, it recently launched the "Google AI Impact Challenge"

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Google's new AI model to help detect diabetic retinopathy. Pixabay

Google has developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) model that can detect diabetic retinopathy with a level of accuracy on par with human retinal specialists, the technology giant said.

Google is working on “rolling out this diabetic retinopathy initiative in clinics in India with Verily” — an Alphabet-owned company which works on life sciences research and development, Kent Walker, SVP of Global Affairs at Google, wrote in a blog post on Thursday.

More than 400 million people in the world have diabetes. A third of them have diabetic retinopathy — a complication that can cause permanent blindness.

“Using the new assistive technology, doctors and staff can screen more patients in less time, sparing people from blindness through a more timely diagnosis,” Walker said.

While the blindness can be prevented, diabetic retinopathy often goes undetected because people do not always get screenings.

“In major part, this is due to limited access to eye care specialists and staff capable of screening for the disease. This is a problem that AI can help us solve,” Walker said.

“Deploying this technology in underserved communities that don’t have enough eye specialists could be life-changing for many,” Walker added.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Google began work on the model in collaboration with eye specialists in India and the US a few years back. They developed an AI system to help doctors analyse images of the back of the eye for signs of diabetic retinopathy.

“The results were promising,” Walker noted, while adding “we should work to make the benefits of AI available to everyone”.

Google has for several years applied AI research and engineering to projects in Asia Pacific with positive societal impact, including stopping illegal fishing in Indonesia, forecasting floods in India, and conserving native bird species in New Zealand, the blog post read.

Also Read- U.S.A: Myanmar’s Military Campaign Against Rohingya Muslims a ‘Mass Genocide’

Besides healthcare, the tech giant also wants to support more Asia Pacific organisations in using AI to help society by engaging with governments, non-profit organisations, universities and businesses.

For this purpose, it recently launched the “Google AI Impact Challenge”.

“Selected organisations who apply to the challenge will receive support from Google’s AI experts and Google.org grant funding from a $25 million pool,” Walker said. (IANS)