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New method may remove the idea of fasting before cholesterol test

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New method may remove the idea of fasting before cholesterol test
New method may remove the idea of fasting before cholesterol test. wikimedia commons
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New York, Jan 3, 2018: A new method of calculating so-called “bad cholesterol” levels has the potential to do away with the need to fast before blood is drawn for such screening, say researchers.

The study, published in the journal Circulation, suggests that the new method is more accurate than an older method in people who did not fast before the cholesterol test.

The new method for calculating LDL, or low-density lipoprotein, was developed by Seth Martin and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the US.

“Although the new LDL calculation method is a bit more complex, the beauty is that it can be performed using information that is already collected in the blood sample for the standard lipid profile and automated in the lab’s computer system to give a more accurate result,” Martin said.

“Since nonfasting samples are now accurate, it’s more convenient for patients because they can come in anytime and don’t need to return for a second appointment if they have eaten,” Martin added.

For the study, the researchers compared the accuracy of the new LDL calculation method with the Friedewald method, developed in the late 1970s when patients fasted or did not fast.

The Friedewald method was earlier shown by Martin and colleagues to underestimate LDL cholesterol levels, particularly in people with high triglycerides.

Triglycerides are fatty acids that tend to be higher in people with obesity and diabetes and that increase after eating.

The physicians did their comparison using data already gathered in a clinical repository.

In their final analysis, the researchers found that approximately 30 per cent of the nonfasting participants had greater than 10 milligrams per decilitre inaccurate cholesterol measurements using the Friedewald method compared with only three per cent error from the actual measured value with the new method.

The new test does not take any longer to provide results to physicians and patients, and the cost is the same to administer, the study said. (IANS)

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High Cholesterol Level Increased Risk of Death, Even in Healthy People

Limiting saturated fat intake, maintaining a healthy weight, discontinuing tobacco use, should apply to everyone,

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red-wine
Red wine contains a plant compound called saponin which blocks the body's absorption of bad cholesterol, LDL. Pixabay

People who are young and healthy may still be vulnerable to the risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease if they have higher levels of bad cholesterol, according to a new research.

Bad cholesterol, or LDL, contributes to clogged arteries which increases the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The findings showed that compared with participants who had LDL readings of under 100 mg/dL, those with LDL levels in the range of 100-159 mg/dL had a 30 to 40 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease death.

Those with LDL levels of 160 mg/dL or higher had a 70 to 90 per cent increased risk of cardiovascular death, compared with participants who had LDL readings of under 100 mg/dL.

“Our study demonstrates that having a low 10-year estimated cardiovascular disease risk does not eliminate the risk posed by elevated LDL over the course of a lifetime,” said lead author Shuaib Abdullah, from the University of Texas in the US.

cholesterol checkup
New method may remove the idea of fasting before cholesterol test.

“High cholesterol at younger ages means there will be a greater burden of cardiovascular disease as these individuals age,” added Robert Eckel, from the University of Colorado in the US.

The study, published in the journal Circulation, included 36,375 young, relatively healthy participants who were free of diabetes or cardiovascular disease and were followed for 27 years.

Among the group (72 per cent men with an average age 42 years), there were 1,086 deaths from cardiovascular disease such as stroke, and 598 coronary heart disease deaths.

“Those with low risk should pursue lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise, to achieve LDL levels as low as possible, preferably under 100 mg/dL.

Also Read: Eating Strawberries Boosts Gut Health, Here’s How

“Limiting saturated fat intake, maintaining a healthy weight, discontinuing tobacco use, and increasing aerobic exercises should apply to everyone,” Abdullah said. (IANS)

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