Friday November 15, 2019

Nerve Cell Cancer Survivors, At Higher Risk Of Developing Depression

The data were compared with the additional data from 872 siblings.

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Nerve Cell Cancer Survivors, At Higher Risk Of Developing Depression
Nerve Cell Cancer Survivors, At Higher Risk Of Developing Depression, Pixabay

Researchers have found that patients who suffered from pediatric neuroblastoma — a childhood cancer of nerve cells — may have a higher risk of developing long term psychological difficulties, including depression and attention deficit disorders.

“These findings are novel because this is the first large study that could look at how neuroblastoma patients are doing in terms of psychological and educational outcomes,” said one of the researchers Nina Kadan-Lottick from Yale University School of Medicine in the US.

“Our hope is that these findings will help inform strategies for early screening and intervention to identify those survivors at highest risk for developing psychological and educational impairment later on in life,” Lottick explained.

The study, published in the journal Cancer, analysed data from 859 children who had been diagnosed with neuroblastoma at least five years earlier and were under 18 years old. The data were compared with the additional data from 872 siblings of these patients.

A nerve
A nerve, Representational image, flickr

The results showed that neuroblastoma survivors had 19 per cent increased prevalence of impairment in the domains of anxiety or depression as opposed to 14 per cent among the siblings.

The team also found that 19 per cent increased risk of headstrong behaviour among the patients as opposed to 13 per cent among the sibling group.

The patients group had 21 per cent higher prevalence of attention deficit disorders and 16 per cent higher risk of antisocial behaviour compared to 13 per cent and 12 per cent risk respectively in the sibling group.

Treatment advances in recent years have prolonged survival for many children diagnosed with neuroblastoma, but their young age at diagnosis and the specific therapies they receive can make them vulnerable to health problems as their central nervous system develops, the study said.

Mental patient
Mental patient, representational image, flickr

Also read: Finally the cause of depression among diabetes patients decoded

“The goal is not simply to get our patients to be cancer-free but also to optimise their mental, emotional, and social functioning as they move into adolescence and adulthood,” Lottick said. (IANS)

Next Story

If Correctly Practiced, Yoga Can Help to Recover Mental Health Issues

Although studies with more participants would be helpful in further investigating its benefits, this small study indicates adding yoga to the prescription may be helpful

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Yoga
Research has shown combining therapy and medication along with Yoga has greater success than either treatment alone. Pixabay

 

 If applied in right “doses”, Yoga and breathing exercises can improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in both short and long terms, reveal new research.

Published in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice, the study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provided evidence that yoga can be a helpful complementary treatment for clinical depression or major depressive disorder.

To reach this conclusion, a group of 30 clinically depressed patients were randomly divided into two groups.

Both groups engaged in lyengar yoga (founded by B.K.S. Iyengar) and coherent breathing with the only difference being the number of instructional and home sessions in which each group participated.

Over three months, the high-dose group spent 123 hours in sessions while the low-dose group spent 87 hours.

Results showed that within a month, both groups’ sleep quality significantly improved.

Tranquility, positivity, physical exhaustion and symptoms of anxiety and depression significantly improved in both groups, as measured by several validated clinical scales

“Think of it this way, we give medications in different doses in order to enact their effects on the body to varying degrees. Here, we explored the same concept, but used yoga. We call that a dosing study,” explained Chris Streeter, associate professor of psychiatry at BUSM.

Past yoga and depression studies have not really delved deeply into this.

Yoga
If applied in right “doses”, Yoga and breathing exercises can improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in both short and long terms, reveal new research. Pixabay

“The data is crucial for accompanying investigations of underlying neurobiology that will help elucidate ‘how’ yoga works,” added study co-author Marisa M. Silveri, neuroscientist at McLean Hospital and associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Research has shown combining therapy and medication has greater success than either treatment alone.

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Although studies with more participants would be helpful in further investigating its benefits, this small study indicates adding yoga to the prescription may be helpful. (IANS)