Wednesday January 29, 2020

2 Drinks a Day Put Adults at a Higher Risk of Developing Dementia

If you drink nearly 14 drinks per week (2 drinks per day), you may be at a higher risk of developing dementia than those who enjoy drink a week

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No amount of alcohol consumption was significantly associated with higher risk for dementia compared with drinking less than one drink per week. Pixabay

If you drink nearly 14 drinks per week (2 drinks per day) and already suffer from mild cognitive impairment (MCI), you may be at a higher risk of developing dementia than those who enjoy drink a week, say researchers.

According to researchers from Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, among those adults with MCI, the risk of dementia according to numbers of alcoholic drinks per week wasn’t statistically significant, although it appeared to be highest for drinking more than 14 drinks per week compared with less than one drink.

In this cohort study of 3,021 participants aged 72 years and older, alcohol intake within recommended limits was not significantly associated with a lower risk of dementia among participants with or without mild cognitive impairment at baseline.

Among participants without mild cognitive impairment, daily low-quantity drinking was associated with lower dementia risk compared with infrequent higher-quantity drinking.

“The findings suggest that physicians caring for older adults need to carefully assess the full dimensions of drinking behaviour and cognition when providing guidance to patients about their alcohol consumption,” said the research led by Manja Koch from T.H. Chan School of Public Health and published in the journal JAMA Network Open.

The study analyzed 3,021 adults (72 and older) who were free of dementia (2,548 were without MCI and 473 with MCI). During about six years of follow-up, there were 512 cases of dementia, including 348 cases of Alzheimer disease.

Among those adults without MCI, no amount of alcohol consumption was significantly associated with higher risk for dementia compared with drinking less than one drink per week.

Given the rapidly growing burden of Alzheimer disease (AD) and other dementias, including 50 million people currently living with dementia and 82 million expected by 2030, the identification of factors that prevent or delay the onset of dementia remains of paramount concern.

drinks, everyday, dementia, higher risk, risk
The participants reported their frequency of beer, wine, and liquor consumption in days per week and their usual number of 12-oz cans or bottles of beer, 6-oz glasses of wine, and shots of liquor consumed on each occasion. Pixabay

During the study, the participants reported their frequency of beer, wine, and liquor consumption in days per week and their usual number of 12-oz cans or bottles of beer, 6-oz glasses of wine, and shots of liquor consumed on each occasion.

“We categorized participants according to their alcohol consumption as follows: none, less than 1 drink per week, 1 to 7 drinks per week, 7.1 to 14 drinks per week, and more than 14 drinks per week,” the authors wrote.

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In this study of older adults, the association of self-reported alcohol consumption with dementia risk appeared to cluster into 3 separate dimensions—baseline cognition, dose and pattern.

“At present, our findings cannot be directly translated into clinical recommendations, and these findings warrant additional studies to confirm these associations further,” the authors suggested. (IANS)

Next Story

Living Near a Major Road or Highway Can Cause Neurological Diseases

The researchers suggest that this protective effect could be due to several factors

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Research found that living less than 50 metres from a major road or less than 150 metres from a highway is associated with a higher risk of developing neurological disorders -- likely due to increased exposure to air pollution. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that living near a major road or highway is linked to higher incidence of dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS).

For the findings, published in the journal Environmental Health, researchers from the University of British Columbia analysed data for 678,000 adults in Metro Vancouver.

They found that living less than 50 metres from a major road or less than 150 metres from a highway is associated with a higher risk of developing neurological disorders — likely due to increased exposure to air pollution.

“For the first time, we have confirmed a link between air pollution and traffic proximity with a higher risk of dementia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and MS at the population level,” said study lead author Weiran Yuchi from the University of British Columbia in Canada.

Neurological disorders, a term that describes a range of disorders, are increasingly recognised as one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide.

Little is known about the risk factors associated with neurological disorders, the majority of which are incurable and typically worsen over time.

For the study, researchers analysed data for 678,000 adults between the ages of 45 and 84 who lived in Metro Vancouver from 1994 to 1998 and during a follow-up period from 1999 to 2003.

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Researchers have revealed that living near a major road or highway is linked to higher incidence of dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS). Pixabay

They estimated individual exposures to road proximity, air pollution, noise and greenness at each person’s residence using postal code data.

During the follow-up period, the researchers identified 13,170 cases of non-Alzheimer’s dementia, 4,201 cases of Parkinson’s disease, 1,277 cases of Alzheimer’s disease and 658 cases of MS.

For non-Alzheimer’s dementia and Parkinson’s disease specifically, living near major roads or a highway was associated with 14 per cent and seven per cent increased risk of both conditions, respectively.

When the researchers accounted for green space, they found the effect of air pollution on the neurological disorders was mitigated.

The researchers suggest that this protective effect could be due to several factors.

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A Study estimated individual exposures to road and Highway proximity, air pollution, noise and greenness at each person’s residence using postal code data. Pixabay

“For people who are exposed to a higher level of green space, they are more likely to be physically active and may also have more social interactions,” said study senior author Michael Brauer.

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“There may even be benefits from just the visual aspects of vegetation,” Brauer added. (IANS)