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20 Moments in 2016 that took Indian Internet by Storm

Dhoni’s last ball run-out against Bangladesh in T20 World Cup

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Representational image. Pixabay

December 30, 2016: The year 2016 has been a year of big happenings and loaded with shocks and surprises.However, it remains really difficult to churn out the positive happenings which has seen many terror attacks. With many unfortunate incidents, some positive things also occured in the year.

Here are some moments that took the Indian internet by storm-


When PM Narendra Modi declared Rs 500, 1000 currency notes to be invalid in an attempt to curb black money

People outside banks. Twitter

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When images of currency notes inscribed in Devanagari “Sonam Gupta bewafa hai” had gone viral on social media.

Twitter

When Kanhaiya Kumar was arrested and charged with sedition by the Delhi police for allegedly raising anti-India slogans in a student rally.

Kanhaiya Kumar. Wikimedia Commons

When daughters of India made us proud at the Olympics.

PV Sindhu. Twitter

Dhoni’s last ball run-out against Bangladesh in T20 World Cup.

Facebook

Hrithik Roshan received 1,439 emails from Kangana Ranaut.

Hrithik Roshan and Kangana Ranaut. Quora

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With the launch of Pokémon Go, the craze to get Pokémons went to an extent where people cared not where they are going, the only think they bothered about was, Pokémons.

Pixabay

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan shocked everyone with her funky purple lipstick at the Cannes Film Festival.

Facebook

When the Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) refused the release certificate for Udta Punjab and asked the makers to make 89 cuts.

www.udtapunjabboxofficecollection.net

Virat Kohli slammed trolls targeting his former girlfriend Anushka Sharma on social media.

Instagram

A 15-year-old boy, Pranav Dhanawade scored a world record 1,009 runs in a single innings during an inter-school match.

Pranav Dhanawade. Twitter

On 29 September, the Indian army said it had conducted “surgical strikes” against suspected militants in Pakistani-administered Kashmir.

Indian Army. Wikimedia Commons

When Bollywood banned Pakistani artists.

We’ll miss you, Fawad!

Fawad Khan. Twitter

When a blue-eyed handsome young chaiwala from Pakistan became an internet sensation.

Facebook

Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu Jayalalithaa Jayaram, ‘Amma’ to millions passed away.

PM Narendra Modi pays tribute to Jayalalithaa. FacekookN

When Arnab Goswami, Editor-in-Chief and President (News) of Times Now and ET Now resigned from Times Now.

Facebook

Pakistani singer Taher Shah, who became an online sensation with his ‘Angel’ song.

Taher Shah. Twitter

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Coldplay’s electrifying concert in Mumbai, India

Coldplay. Twitter

Kareena Kapoor Khan, Saif Ali Khan blessed with a baby boy, named him Taimur

Twitter

– Prepared by Ruchika Kumari of NewsGram. Twitter: @RuchiUjjaini

 

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People Use Hate Speech While Searching About Terrorism on Social Media

People post hate speech while seeking answers on terrorism

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Social Media terrorism
People often resort to using hate speech when searching about terrorism on a community group social media platform. Pixabay

People often resort to using hate speech when searching about terrorism on a community group social media platform, say researchers.

According to Snehasish Banerjee, lecturer at the York Management School, University of York, it appears seems that people are really curious to know about terrorists, what terrorists think, their ideas, etc.

“While portrayed as a threat to society and human civilisation by mainstream media, terrorists sell terrorism as freedom fighting via social networking sites and private messaging platforms,” said Banerjee.

“However, the actual workings of terrorism are largely shrouded in secrecy. For the curious, a convenient avenue to turn to is the community question answering sites”.

Community question answering sites (CQAs) are social media platforms where users ask questions, answer those submitted by others, and have the option to evaluate responses. Previous studies have mainly looked at terrorism-related data drawn from Facebook and Twitter, this was the first to examine trends on the CQA site, Yahoo! Answers.

Social Media terrorism
While portrayed as a threat to society and human civilisation by mainstream media, terrorists sell terrorism as freedom fighting via social media platforms. Pixabay

The University of York study explored the use of Yahoo! Answers on the topic of terrorism and looked at a dataset of 300 questions that attracted more than 2,000 answers. The questions reflected the community’s information needs, ranging from the life of extremists to counter-terrorism policies. Sensitive questions outnumbered innocuous ones.

A typical innocuous question was: Who exactly created ISIS?, while a more sensitive question was: Do you agree with Donald Trump that we should ban Muslims coming from countries seized by ISIS, Al Qaeda and other terrorists? According to the findings, sensitive questions were significantly more likely to be submitted anonymously than innocuous ones.

While no significant difference arose with respect to answers, the paper found that identities were seldom recognisable. Using names non-traceable to themselves, the community group users become embolden to use provocative, inflammatory or uncivil language. “We found that answers were laden with negative emotions reflecting hate speech and Islamophobia, making claims that were rarely verifiable,” said Banerjee.

Also Read- Facebook and Twitter Remain Divided due to Bloomberg’s Video

Users who posted sensitive questions and answers generally tended to remain anonymous.

“This paper calls for governments and law enforcement agencies to collaborate with major social media companies, including CQAs, to develop a process for cross-platform blacklisting of users and content, as well as identifying those who are vulnerable,” the authors noted in the Aslib Journal of Information Management. (IANS)