Saturday September 22, 2018
Home World Israeli Archa...

Israeli Archaeologists Discover 2,000-year-old Stone Factory in Galilee

This factory is known to produce vessels similar to the one Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine

0
//
90
Israel
Stone vessels used by Jews in Israel during Roman period. Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint
  • This factory produced vessels similar to the ones Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine
  • During the Roman period, vessels were made of ceramics
  • Galilee is known for the Sea of Galilee, where Jesus Christ is said to have walked on water

Tel Aviv, August 11, 2017: Israeli archaeologists have discovered a 2,000-year-old stone factory in Galilee that produced vessels similar to the one Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine.

Excavations began after the site was discovered during construction work for a municipal sports centre, reports Efe news.

“The fact that Jews at this time used stone vessels for religious reasons is well attested in the Talmudic sources and in the New Testament as well,” Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Yardenna Alexandre said on Thursday.

ALSO READ: Egypt discovers new necropolis with as many as 30 intact mummies near the city of Minya

During the Roman period, vessels were made of ceramics: a material Jews considered impure and inappropriate for purification rituals because it is breakable, so they opted instead to use stone.

“It is possible that large stone containers of the type mentioned in the wedding at Cana of Galilee story may have been produced locally in Galilee,” Alexandre said.

“Our excavations are highlighting the pivotal role of ritual purity observance – not only in Jerusalem, but in the far-off Galilee as well,” excavation director Yonatan Adler said.

Galilee is a fertile, mountainous region in northern Israel. It is known for the Sea of Galilee, where Jesus Christ is said to have walked on water. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

0
Neighborhoods
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

Archeology , Neolithic artefacts. england
Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

Also Read: Britain Fully Committed to Ensuring Iran Nuclear Deal

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)