Monday March 30, 2020
Home Lead Story 29% People in...

29% People in US Have an Unfavourable View of Facebook: Survey

Scepticism about Facebook has grown in US: Survey

0
//
Facebook
The survey conducted by The Verge suggests that Amazon continues to be popular with the American people, while scepticism about Facebook has grown over the years. Pixabay

While a bigger proportion of the population in the US holds a highly favourable view of Amazon, more people have a very “unfavourable” view of Facebook than they did in 2016, said a new survey on Monday.

The survey conducted by The Verge suggests that Amazon continues to be popular with the American people, while scepticism about Facebook has grown over the years.

However, more people have an unfavourable view of Twitter than Facebook.

While 39 per cent of the respondents said they had an unfavourable view of Twitter, 29 per cent had the same view of Facebook and 9 per cent thought the same of Amazon.

While just 41 per cent of the respondents said they trust social media with their information, 43 per cent said they trust Twitter with their information.

“Microsoft leads big tech companies in the number of Americans who say they trust it, at 75 per cent of survey respondents. Amazon is close behind, at 73 per cent,” said the report.

Facebook
While 39 per cent of the respondents said they had an unfavourable view of Twitter, 29 per cent had the same view of Facebook. Pixabay

The Verge “Tech Trust Survey” also revealed that Americans generally believe the biggest tech companies have too much power and ought to be broken up.

Among survey respondents, more than half (56 per cent) said the government should break up technology companies if they control too much of the economy.

Also Read- Here’s why Twitter Told Its 5000 Employees to Work From Home

Almost three-fourths of the respondents (72 per cent) said that Facebook has too much power, while over half of them (51 per cent) said Google and YouTube should be split into separate companies.

While people in the US are more likely to think that Twitter, Slack, Instagram, and other social media platforms have an overall negative effect, they believe that Google, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Netflix, and YouTube have an overall positive effect on society, showed the results. (IANS)

Next Story

Find Out How Restaurant Owners Are Operating Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

Restaurants Revamp Menus, Operations to Stay in Business During Pandemic

0
restaurant
Lucy Kwak paints a sign on the window of a fast food chain's restaurant indicating that the drive-thru window is still open as well as a takeout option during the coronavirus outbreak in Garden Grove, Calif. VOA

In the battle to keep their New York City restaurant going despite sharp restrictions during the coronavirus outbreak, the owners of Il Posto Accanto tried something Beatrice Tosti di Valminuta would have considered sacrilege in normal times.

That was offering their traditional Italian dishes for delivery, “which never, never, never, ever, ever, ever happened before,” she said. “I like my food to go from the kitchen to the table, and that’s it!”

On Friday, she said she and husband Julio Pena decided to suspend operations because employees were wary of being out in New York City, which is now the U.S. epicenter of the contagion.

“We respect their feelings,” she said. “It’s not like we were making money.”

restaurant
James Mark, right, owner of the restaurant Big King, talks with Jennifer Wittlin as they prepare for dinner take-out orders Wednesday, March 25, 2020, in Providence, R.I. Mark said pushing to restart the economy before the health crisis is over would put businesses like his in a terrible position. VOA

Across the United States, restaurateurs are transforming operations to try to stay afloat. The National Restaurant Association warns that the outbreak could cost 5 million to 7 million jobs and hundreds of billions in losses and is pushing for a special federal relief package for restaurants.

In an industry of traditionally tight profit margins, some decided it’s time to take chances.

Frisch’s Big Boy restaurants, a Cincinnati-based chain that laid off more than a third of its 5,000 employees in the first days of bans on in-restaurant dining, last week pivoted into the grocery business. Besides its signature Big Boy double-decker burgers and onion rings, customers at its 100 restaurants in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky can buy bread, milk and and produce at its drive-throughs and carryout counters and via home delivery.

Frisch’s saw a quick jump in revenues at a time when people have been frustrated by long lines and shortages at traditional supermarkets. Toilet paper is in high demand, and Frisch’s and others are using it as a lure.

Westmont Diner in Westmont, N.J., has added it to carry-out options at 60 cents a roll, along with paper towels, soap, bleach and other household needs. Lindey’s in Columbus, Ohio, throws in a free roll with all takeout orders. Frontier in Chicago gave out decks of cards to homebound customers with their carryout dinners.

Some close

With the number of states with stay-at-home orders growing, some restaurateurs decided to shut down. Cameron Mitchell, based in Columbus, said carryout offerings weren’t bringing in enough business to keep his namesake chain of 36 restaurants in 12 states going. More than 4,000 employees were laid off last week.

Some fine-dining restaurants unused to carryout are trying scaled-down menu at bargain prices.

In Chicago, patrons can now carry out food for a fraction of the typical dine-in tab at Alinea, where nabbing a seat typically requires reservations weeks in advance and dinners can cost as much as $395 per head. Alinea now offers takeout meals of beef wellington, mashed potatoes and creme brulee for $39.95, and reports strong sales so far.

Meanwhile, in Los Angeles, Mayor Eric Garcetti said Monday that with Californians under a stay-home edict, restaurants are allowed to deliver alcoholic beverages along with meals to boost their revenues.

restaurant
Frisch’s Big Boy restaurant employee Nicole Cox bags up an order of toilet paper, among in-demand items including milk and bread the double-decker burger chain is now offering during the coronavirus outbreak in Cincinnati, Ohio. VOA

Sitting in the nearly empty Frisch’s “Mainliner” restaurant where the chain originated in suburban Cincinnati in 1942, CEO Jason Vaughn said customers at the privately held chain’s 100 restaurants have asked for additions, such as bottles of orange juice, quarts of soup and coffee for home. Frisch’s is trying to leverage its supply chain to accommodate requests.

Vaughn predicts the crisis will change the industry.

“People have changed habits,” he  said. “When the green light goes on, we don’t expect to come back as status quo … when we go to whatever that new norm is, we’ll see if we can continue it [groceries] if it’s a service the community wants.”

Also Read- Lucid Ways Through Which Cinema Puts an impact on Your Life

In New York, Tosti said leftover meals would be given to city firefighters. She said the restaurant’s future after some 15 years of operation would depend on how long quarantining and edicts against in-restaurant dining lasted.

“I’m better at taking it one day at a time,” said the Rome-born restaurateur. “We can hope for a better day.” (VOA)