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3 International Space Station (ISS) crew members gear up for homecoming on Monday, ending their 173-day mission in space

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Washington, April 8, 2017: Three crew members aboard the International Space Station are packing up their gear for a homecoming on Monday, ending their 173-day mission in space, NASA said.

Expedition 50 crew members Shane Kimbrough, Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko will take a ride back to Earth inside the Soyuz MS-02 spacecraft.

The are scheduled to land Monday at 7:21 a.m. EDT (4.51 p.m. India time) in Kazakhstan.

“Commander Shane Kimbrough, who is returning to Earth early Monday, took it easy Friday aboard the International Space Station. He and Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson and Thomas Pesquet mainly performed light duty tasks and continued their daily exercise to stay healthy in space,” NASA scientists wrote in a blog post on Friday.

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“Cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrey Borisenko, who are returning home Monday with Kimbrough, continued packing the Soyuz MS-02 spacecraft that will parachute the trio to a landing in Kazakhstan after a 173 days in space,” the blog post said.

Ryzhikov, who is on his first mission, will command the Soyuz during its undocking and reentry into Earth’s atmosphere. Borisenko and Kimbrough are both wrapping up their second visit to space.

Whitson will become station commander for the second time in her career Sunday less than 24 hours before her crewmates undock from the Poisk module.

She stays behind with fellow Expedition 50-51 crew members Thomas Pesquet and Flight Engineer Oleg Novitskiy. (IANS)

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New Study Shows That Binaries From Globular Clusters Can be Detected by LISA

The European Space Agency's next-generation Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave detector can potentially detect dozens of binary files in the globular clusters of the Milky Way, scientists say.

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In particular, these models suggest that the Kuiper Belt -- a cold region beyond the orbit of Neptune -- should contain a small fraction of rocky bodies from the inner solar system, such as carbon-rich asteroids, referred to as carbonaceous asteroids.
representational image, pixabay

The European Space Agency’s next-generation Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave detector can potentially detect dozens of binary files in the globular clusters of the Milky Way, scientists say.

Globular clusters are dense environments containing millions of tightly packed stars and are efficient factories for gravitational wave sources.

LISA, which is expected to be in space in 2034, will be able to detect binary sources — pairs of orbiting compact objects.

These binary sources will contain all combinations of black hole, neutron star and white dwarf components.

While 150 globular clusters have been observed so far in the Milky Way, one out of every three clusters will produce a LISA source.
Representational image. Pixabay

LISA will also be sensitive to gravitational waves of a lower frequency than those detected by the Earth-bound Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)

“LISA is sensitive to Milky Way systems and will expand the breadth of the gravitational wave spectrum, allowing us to explore different types of objects that aren’t observable with LIGO,” said lead author Kyle Kremer, a doctoral student at the Northwestern University in Illinois, US.

While 150 globular clusters have been observed so far in the Milky Way, one out of every three clusters will produce a LISA source.

Approximately eight black hole binaries will be detectable by LISA in our neighbouring galaxy of Andromeda and another 80 in nearby Virgo, the study showed.

The research, published by the journal Physical Review Letters, is the first to use realistic globular cluster models to make detailed predictions of LISA sources.

Also Read: NASA Is Sending a Helicopter to Mars in 2020 

The team used more than a hundred fully evolved globular cluster models with properties similar to those of the observed globular clusters in the Milky Way.

The models were run on Quest, Northwestern’s supercomputer cluster. This powerful resource can evolve the full 12 billion years of a globular cluster’s life in a matter of days. (IANS)