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34 Indian Scientists invited for 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany

A total of 400 young scientists from 76 countries have been selected to participate in the meeting, where they will meet Nobel laureates at Lake Constance

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Nobel Prize (Representational Image). Wikimedia

Kolkata, March 22, 2017: As many as 34 young Indian scientists have been invited for the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany from June 25 to 30, it was announced on Wednesday.

A total of 400 young scientists from 76 countries have been selected to participate in the meeting, where they will meet Nobel laureates at Lake Constance.

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“Of the 34 young Indian scientists, 22 are based at Indian universities or institutes while the other 12 are currently based … abroad (in Australia, Germany, Ireland, Israel, the UK, and the US),” said a statement from the communications department of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings.

“Every year, one-to-two members of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings travel to India to assist with the selection of young scientists. Besides India, the only other country that they travel to in order to assist with the selection process is China,” the communique said.

In South Asia, five young scientists from Pakistan and one young scientist from Bangladesh have been selected to participate.

The meetings have taken place every year since 1951 and are designed as a forum for exchange, networking and inspiration.

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The 2017 meeting is dedicated to Chemistry. So far, 31 Nobel laureates have confirmed their participation.

The young scientists are outstanding undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctorates under the age of 35, conducting research in the field of Chemistry.

They have successfully passed a multi-stage international selection process. 155 scientific institutes, universities, foundations and research-oriented companies contributed to the nominations.

The proportion of women among the selected young scientists is 45 per cent.

Bernard Feringa and Jean-Pierre Sauvage, who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016, together with Sir Fraser Stoddart, for the design of molecular machines, will also participate in this year’s meeting.

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 Besides molecular machines, the key topics of the this year’s meeting will include big data, climate change and the role of science in a ‘post-truth’ era.

The selected young scientists may expect a six-day programme with numerous lectures and panel discussions. Some of them will also get the opportunity to discuss their own work at one of the master classes or at the poster session. (IANS)

Next Story

Three Scientists Win Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their Contributions to Development of Lithium-Ion Batteries

Goran Hansson, secretary-general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, said the prize was about ``a rechargeable world"

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Scientists, Nobel Prize, Chemistry
Goran K Hansson, Secretary-General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and academy members, announce the winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Oct. 9, 2019. VOA

Three scientists on Wednesday were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their contributions to the development of lithium-ion batteries, which have reshaped energy storage and transformed cars, mobile phones and many other devices in an increasingly portable and electronic world.

The prize went to John B. Goodenough of the University of Texas; M. Stanley Whittingham of the State University of New York at Binghamton; and Akira Yoshino of Asahi Kasei Corporation and Meijo University in Japan.

Goran Hansson, secretary-general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, said the prize was about “a rechargeable world.”

In a statement, the committee said lithium-ion batteries “have revolutionized our lives” — and the laureates “laid the foundation of a wireless, fossil fuel-free society.”

Scientists, Nobel Prize, Chemistry
The prize went to John B. Goodenough of the University of Texas; M. Stanley Whittingham of the State University of New York at Binghamton; and Akira Yoshino of Asahi Kasei Corporation. Pixabay

The Nobel committee said the lithium-ion battery has its roots in the oil crisis in the 1970s, when Whittingham was working to develop methods aimed at leading to fossil fuel-free energy technologies.

The prizes come with a 9-million kronor ($918,000) cash award, a gold medal and a diploma that are conferred on Dec. 10 — the anniversary of Nobel’s death in 1896 — in Stockholm and in Oslo, Norway.

Prize founder Alfred Nobel, a Swedish industrialist who invented dynamite, decided the physics, chemistry, medicine and literature prizes should be awarded in Stockholm, and the peace prize in Oslo.

On Tuesday, Canadian-born James Peebles won the Physics Prize for his theoretical discoveries in cosmology together with Swiss scientists Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, who were honored for finding an exoplanet — a planet outside our solar system — that orbits a solar-type star.

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Americans William G. Kaelin Jr. and Gregg L. Semenza and Britain’s Peter J. Ratcliffe won the Nobel Prize for advances in physiology or medicine on Monday. They were cited for their discoveries of “how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability.”

Two literature laureates are to be announced Thursday, because last year’s award was suspended after a scandal rocked the Swedish Academy. The coveted Nobel Peace Prize is Friday and the economics award on Monday. (VOA)