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4 Incentives Which Will Power Up Your Employees

Everyone is different, but flexible work practices with clear demands can help businesses achieve more

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Office, Staff, Work
Incentives have a knock on effect upon the business itself.

Keeping your staff engaged day after day, week after week, is no mean feat for businesses. From the Monday blues, to the post-holiday slump, ensuring your team is at its most efficient, most productive, most creative and most motivated can feel insurmountable at certain points in the year. At that’s before you’ve taken each staff member’s personal life into consideration. From problems at home, to health troubles and general life worries, there’s a lot that can distract our most important assets; our employees.

Incentivisation can help businesses overcome disengagement and distraction, especially when it’s applied intelligently. Incentives can work wonders for a workforce, but they can also cause a litany of issues including nurturing unhealthy rivalries, generating accusations of favouritism and leaving some staff feeling patronised or unseen.

Vietnam Office, business, staff
Small businesses take advantage of co-working spaces like this one, in Ho Chi Minh City, VOA

Get incentives right, however, and you could power up productivity and nurture a positive company culture where staff feel more engaged and involved in the business. The key to getting it right? Asking your staff. Find out what types of incentives would motivate them (time off or financial rewards?), discover whether competition or collaboration would be more incentivising for them. Set up a poll for your team to gather their opinions.

Here are a few good suggestions to get the ball rolling:

 

  • Get competitive
    For some businesses, competition amongst staff simply doesn’t work. For others, it can light a real fire under employees. To avoid resentments brewing, consult your staff on reasonable targets and their ideal benefits. You may also want to stagger rewards so that more staff receive bonuses (this can prevent one high-performing staff member walking away with the prize every quarter).
  • Give “idea bonuses”
    Encourage creativity and workplace engagement by giving ideas bonuses. Call for fully-formed ideas (with a practical plan) which either generally benefit your business or target a particular issue, then ask the whole company to vote for their favourite after the deadline. The winner(s) will receive a prize (consult your staff on what they would most like) and will see their idea implemented.

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    Increasing numbers of businesses are allowing flexible working. Pixabay
  • Offer on site benefits
    Some employees will not be receptive to target-oriented schemes. In some instances, creating a working environment which offers perks and benefits is highly incentivising. Employers who arrange fresh fruit deliveries from Fruitful Office, host yoga classes, arrange at-desk massage appointments, fill workplaces with fresh flowers (you name it), frequently enjoy lower turnover rates, higher employee loyalty and increase health and happiness amongst staff. This, of course, has a knock on effect upon the business itself.

Also Read: Does Your Home or Office Have Enough Fire Safety?

  • Allow autonomy
    As Dolly Parton sings, working nine to five (or indeed 8.30am-6pm) is no way to make a living. Giving your team greater autonomy over their working life can be hugely incentivising. Increasing numbers of businesses are allowing flexible working, which means setting targets for each day, week, month or quarter – then allowing their employees to set their own working hours. Perhaps some are night owls and others are early birds, perhaps some work best from home in their pyjamas. Everyone is different, but flexible work practices with clear demands can help businesses achieve more, while keeping their staff happier.

Next Story

Silicon Valley, Google Walk Off To Protest Against Mishandling Of Sexual Harassment Cases

The workers went back to their offices but vowed to continue pressuring Google to change.

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Google, Web summit, sexual misconduct, trafficking
Google employees fill Harry Bridges Plaza in front of the Ferry Building during a walkout, Nov. 1, 2018, in San Francisco. Hundreds of Google employees around the world briefly walked off the job in a protest against what they said is the tech company's mishandling of sexual misconduct allegations against executives. VOA

It was a protest that went around the globe.

From Singapore to Dublin, Sao Paulo, Brazil, and Pryor, Oklahoma, Google employees walked out of their offices to protest the internet search giant’s handling of sexual discrimination cases, and express their frustration with its workplace culture.

In San Francisco, where Google has several offices, hundreds of workers congregated at a plaza where they gave speeches and held signs. One read: “I reported and he got promoted.”

The unusual protest — tech companies are not unionized and typically keep strife about personnel matters behind closed doors — riveted Silicon Valley, which has struggled in recent years over the treatment of women in the industry.

Resignation, severance

The Google protest was spurred by a New York Times story that outlined allegations against high-profile leaders at the firm, including Andy Rubin, known as “the father of Android,” who was reportedly paid $90 million in severance. Rubin has denied the allegations in the article, as well as reports of his severance amount.

Richard DeVaul, a director at X, a unit of Google’s parent company, Alphabet, resigned from the company on Tuesday. He was accused of making unwanted advances to a woman who was a job applicant at the firm.

 

Google, protest
Google employees walk off the job in a protest against what they said is the tech company’s mishandling of sexual misconduct allegations against executives. VOA

 

 List of demands

“We are a small part of a massive movement that has been growing for a long time,” protest organizers said in an article published in the online magazine The Cut. “We are inspired by everyone — from the women in fast food who led an action against sexual harassment to the thousands of women in the #metoo movement who have been the beginning of the end for this type of abuse.”

Leaders of the protest issued a list of demands, including that Alphabet add a worker-representative to its board of directors and that the firm internally disclose pay equity information.

They also asked the company to revise its human resources practices to make the harassment claims filing process more equitable, and to create a “publicly disclosed sexual harassment transparency report.”

Google
Google employees gather in a courtyard as they take part in a walkout from their jobs at the Google campus in Kirkland, Washington. VOA

Google CEO Sundar Pichai said in an email to employees that “as CEO, it’s been personally important to me that we take a much harder line on inappropriate behavior. … We have taken many steps to do so, and know our work is still not done.”

Social media protest

The global protest unfolded on Twitter and Facebook as employees from offices around the world posted photos of themselves walking out at the appointed time of 11:10 a.m.

Google
Tanuja Gupta, programming director at Google, addresses hundreds of Google employees during a protest rally. VOA

 

The greatest concentration of Google workers is in the San Francisco area. In San Bruno, 12 miles south of San Francisco, employees at YouTube, which is part of Google, walked out, as did those in Mountain View, company headquarters.

“As a woman, I feel personally unsafe, because if something were to happen, what accountability measures will be in place to make sure that justice is sought?” said Google employee Rana Abdelhamid at the San Francisco protest.

Christian Boyd, another Google employee, was angry about what she said was protecting the powerful, even in the face of credible allegations.

“It’s sad to see that what we consider the best companies are not immune to this, as well,” Boyd said.

Also Read: Everything You Need To Know About The #MeToo Movement

After 30 minutes of speeches, the workers went back to their offices but vowed to continue pressuring Google to change. (VOA)