Friday February 23, 2018

40 Million Death Per Year Due to Non Communicable Disease : WHO

Monitoring growth of Non Communicable Disease and the risk associated with it is important, says WHO

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WHO reveals non communicable disease dangerous
World Health Organisation. Wikimedia Commons
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  • Non Communicable disease are the most dangerous diseases which usually last for a prolonged period
  • The driving forces of NCDs are rapid unplanned urbanisation, globalisation of unhealthy lifestyle and ageing of population
  • Facts reveal that the chronic diseases start at a premature age

June 27, 2017:  Non-Communicable diseases (NCD) are the result of a combination of genetic, physiological, environmental and behaviours factors. There are four main types of NCD namely, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, respiratory diseases and diabetes.

According to the World Health Organization, every year 14 million people die due to the non-communicable diseases. Cardiovascular diseases are the most prominent factors for causing the maximum deaths (17 million) which are followed by cancers (8.8-million), respiratory diseases (3.9-million), and diabetes (1.6-million).

Also Read: “Dual-Disease Burden”? India’s Great Healthcare Challenge and Opportunity

NCDs usually occur more in developing or underdeveloped countries and is mostly affect the people of older age groups but the facts say that the maximum number of deaths is in the age group of 30-69, which suggests that the chronic diseases start at a premature age. This makes everyone vulnerable to the diseases in form of unhealthy diet choices, no physical activity and usage or exposure to tobacco smoke or alcohol.

The driving forces of these NCDs are rapid unplanned urbanisation, globalisation of unhealthy lifestyle and ageing of the population. WHO said that the important way to put pressure on growing NCDs is by emphasising the need for reducing the risk factors associated with these diseases. Monitoring growth of NCDs and their risk is important for guiding policies by the government.

There is a need from all the sectors to come together to find ways to reduce the risks of NCDs with investing in better management of NCDs. This would include the detecting and treating these diseases and providing care to people in need and a need for high impact essential NCD interventions have also become necessary.

WHO also mentioned the importance of timely treatment saying, if a person is diagnosed early and treated, it would amount to lesser treatment costs than what would be used for advanced treatments.

Prepared by Sumit Balodi of NewsGram. Twitter: @sumit_balodi

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Night Shifts May Raise Risk Of Diabetes

For the study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, the team examined data from more than 270,000 people, including 70,000 who provided in-depth lifetime employment information and a sub-group of more than 44,000 for whom genetic data were available

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The results showed that those with the highest genetic risk scores were almost four times as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes compared to individuals who had lower genetic risk scores. Pexels
The results showed that those with the highest genetic risk scores were almost four times as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes compared to individuals who had lower genetic risk scores. Pexels

Do you frequently work night shifts? Beware, you are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, a precursor to cardiovascular diseases, researchers have warned.

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar (glucose).

The study found that people working irregular or rotating shifts with usual night shifts were 44 percent more likely to have Type 2 diabetes.

ALSO READ: Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study

“We see a dose-response relationship between a frequency of night shift work and Type 2 diabetes, where the more often people do shift work, the greater their likelihood of having the disease, regardless of genetic predisposition,” said Ceiine Vetter, Professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder.

In addition, compared to day workers, all shift workers were more likely to have Type 2 diabetes, except for permanent night shift workers, the researchers mentioned. Pexels
In addition, compared to day workers, all shift workers were more likely to have Type 2 diabetes, except for permanent night shift workers, the researchers mentioned. Pexels

“This helps us understand one piece of the puzzle: frequency of night shift work seems to be an important factor,” Vetter added.

For the study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, the team examined data from more than 270,000 people, including 70,000 who provided in-depth lifetime employment information and a sub-group of more than 44,000 for whom genetic data were available.

ALSO READ: 6 Foods You Should Mandatorily Avoid At Night

More than 6,000 people in the sample population had Type 2 diabetes.

Using the information on more than 100 genetic variants that are associated with Type 2 diabetes, the research team developed a genetic risk score that they used to assign a value to each participant.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global prevalence of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7 percent to 8.5 percent in the adult population. The majority of people with diabetes are affected by Type 2 diabetes. (IANS)

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