Friday October 19, 2018

40 Million Death Per Year Due to Non Communicable Disease : WHO

Monitoring growth of Non Communicable Disease and the risk associated with it is important, says WHO

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WHO reveals non communicable disease dangerous
World Health Organisation. Wikimedia Commons
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  • Non Communicable disease are the most dangerous diseases which usually last for a prolonged period
  • The driving forces of NCDs are rapid unplanned urbanisation, globalisation of unhealthy lifestyle and ageing of population
  • Facts reveal that the chronic diseases start at a premature age

June 27, 2017:  Non-Communicable diseases (NCD) are the result of a combination of genetic, physiological, environmental and behaviours factors. There are four main types of NCD namely, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, respiratory diseases and diabetes.

According to the World Health Organization, every year 14 million people die due to the non-communicable diseases. Cardiovascular diseases are the most prominent factors for causing the maximum deaths (17 million) which are followed by cancers (8.8-million), respiratory diseases (3.9-million), and diabetes (1.6-million).

Also Read: “Dual-Disease Burden”? India’s Great Healthcare Challenge and Opportunity

NCDs usually occur more in developing or underdeveloped countries and is mostly affect the people of older age groups but the facts say that the maximum number of deaths is in the age group of 30-69, which suggests that the chronic diseases start at a premature age. This makes everyone vulnerable to the diseases in form of unhealthy diet choices, no physical activity and usage or exposure to tobacco smoke or alcohol.

The driving forces of these NCDs are rapid unplanned urbanisation, globalisation of unhealthy lifestyle and ageing of the population. WHO said that the important way to put pressure on growing NCDs is by emphasising the need for reducing the risk factors associated with these diseases. Monitoring growth of NCDs and their risk is important for guiding policies by the government.

There is a need from all the sectors to come together to find ways to reduce the risks of NCDs with investing in better management of NCDs. This would include the detecting and treating these diseases and providing care to people in need and a need for high impact essential NCD interventions have also become necessary.

WHO also mentioned the importance of timely treatment saying, if a person is diagnosed early and treated, it would amount to lesser treatment costs than what would be used for advanced treatments.

Prepared by Sumit Balodi of NewsGram. Twitter: @sumit_balodi

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WHO Vows For Broader Action Against Tobacco

To prevent further interference by tobacco industry in public health policies, the strategy requires parties to the treaty to protect national public health policies "from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry."

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WHO vows tighter, broader action against tobacco, industry interference.

The World Health Organization (WHO) unveiled a global strategy on Saturday to scale up the tobacco control agenda over the next few years and to prevent further interference by tobacco industry in public health policies.

The strategy, titled the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), aims to strengthen implementation of the WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC), with a roadmap to guide the work of the convention parties, the secretariat and other stakeholders with regards to tobacco control from 2019 to 2025, Xinhua reported.

“The adoption of this strategy marks a key milestone in strengthening the FCTC,” said Vera Luiza da Costa e Silva, head of the WHO FCTC Secretariat. “This strategy provides a very clear path forward, with priorities and objectives to reinforce government policies and accelerate global action for more effective implementation of the tobacco control treaty.”

The strategy was concluded during the eighth session (COP8) of the FCTC, which brought together over 1,200 participants, including delegations from 148 parties to the global tobacco control treaty and representatives of UN agencies, other intergovernmental organisations and civil society.

They also agreed to maximize transparency to protect FCTC related sessions and proceedings from the intrusion of tobacco industry representatives and interests.

WHO
Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus gives a news conference at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, VOA

“More than ever, we need to stay the course and strengthen our commitment to ensure that FCTC efforts to protect and promote public health and sustainable development are not hijacked by the tobacco industry,” Costa e Silva said. “We must yield no ground to the tobacco industry.”

To prevent further interference by tobacco industry in public health policies, the strategy requires parties to the treaty to protect national public health policies “from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry.”

In addition to tighter control actions, the parties also addressed the need for tobacco control efforts to integrate strategies to combat the destructive impacts of tobacco on the environment and sustainable development.

Also Read- Actor Varun Dhawan Thinks That People Took Time to Appreciate Him as a Good Actor

Since it came into force in 2005, the FCTC has resulted in national strategies and legislation that have introduced health warning on packages of tobacco and comprehensive bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.

As the only existing global intergovernmental meeting exclusively devoted to tobacco control, the FCTC COP has served as a platform for policy formulation and the adoption of implementation mechanisms by the parties to the convention. (IANS)