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40 Million Death Per Year Due to Non Communicable Disease : WHO

Monitoring growth of Non Communicable Disease and the risk associated with it is important, says WHO

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WHO reveals non communicable disease dangerous
World Health Organisation. Wikimedia Commons
  • Non Communicable disease are the most dangerous diseases which usually last for a prolonged period
  • The driving forces of NCDs are rapid unplanned urbanisation, globalisation of unhealthy lifestyle and ageing of population
  • Facts reveal that the chronic diseases start at a premature age

June 27, 2017:  Non-Communicable diseases (NCD) are the result of a combination of genetic, physiological, environmental and behaviours factors. There are four main types of NCD namely, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, respiratory diseases and diabetes.

According to the World Health Organization, every year 14 million people die due to the non-communicable diseases. Cardiovascular diseases are the most prominent factors for causing the maximum deaths (17 million) which are followed by cancers (8.8-million), respiratory diseases (3.9-million), and diabetes (1.6-million).

Also Read: “Dual-Disease Burden”? India’s Great Healthcare Challenge and Opportunity

NCDs usually occur more in developing or underdeveloped countries and is mostly affect the people of older age groups but the facts say that the maximum number of deaths is in the age group of 30-69, which suggests that the chronic diseases start at a premature age. This makes everyone vulnerable to the diseases in form of unhealthy diet choices, no physical activity and usage or exposure to tobacco smoke or alcohol.

The driving forces of these NCDs are rapid unplanned urbanisation, globalisation of unhealthy lifestyle and ageing of the population. WHO said that the important way to put pressure on growing NCDs is by emphasising the need for reducing the risk factors associated with these diseases. Monitoring growth of NCDs and their risk is important for guiding policies by the government.

There is a need from all the sectors to come together to find ways to reduce the risks of NCDs with investing in better management of NCDs. This would include the detecting and treating these diseases and providing care to people in need and a need for high impact essential NCD interventions have also become necessary.

WHO also mentioned the importance of timely treatment saying, if a person is diagnosed early and treated, it would amount to lesser treatment costs than what would be used for advanced treatments.

Prepared by Sumit Balodi of NewsGram. Twitter: @sumit_balodi

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Study: Air Pollution Linked to Metabolic Syndrome, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Diseases

Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of cardiovascular diseases, the researchers said

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air pollution, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension
Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of stroke, the researchers said. Pixabay

People who are exposed to high pollution levels are at significantly higher risk of suffering from hypertension, metabolic syndrome and heart diseases, says a new study.

In the study, published in Journal of Public Health, the researchers investigated the associations between a long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and residential distance to green spaces and major roads with the development of hypertension and metabolic syndrome components such as a high triglyceride level, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, higher blood glucose, and obesity.

Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of cardiovascular diseases, the researchers said. The study’s findings showed that air pollution levels above the median are associated with a higher risk of reduced high density lipoprotein.

air pollution, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension
The study’s findings showed that air pollution levels above the median are associated with a higher risk of reduced high density lipoprotein. VOA

Traffic-related exposure was associated with the incidence of hypertension, higher triglyceride level and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the negative impact of traffic air pollutants was observed only in the participants who lived in multifamily buildings.

ALSO READ: Paris to Restrict Car Use as a Measure to Fight Against Surging Air Pollution

The researchers also found positive effects of the natural environment, and have emphasized the positive impact of such spaces on cardiovascular health.

“Our research results enable us to say that we should regulate as much as possible the living space for one person in multifamily houses, improve the noise insulation of apartments, and promote the development of green spaces in multifamily houses” said study’s lead author Agn Brazien. (IANS)