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463 million children were unable to access remote learning after their schools were shut due to the coronavirus pandemic, a Unicef report said. Pinterest

At least 463 million children were unable to access remote learning after their schools were shut due to the coronavirus pandemic, a Unicef report said.

“For at least 463 million children whose schools closed due to Covid-19, there was no such a thing as remote learning,” Xinhua news agency quoted Henrietta Fore, Unicef executive director, as saying in the report issued on Thursday.


“The sheer number of children whose education was completely disrupted for months on end is a global education emergency.

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“The repercussions could be felt in economies and societies for decades to come,” she added.


Children from the poorest households and those living in rural areas are by far the most likely to miss out during closures, the report said. Pinterest

It used a globally representative analysis of the availability of home-based technology and tools needed for remote learning among pre-primary, primary, lower-secondary and upper-secondary school children.

The report considered access to television, radio and the internet. Then it took into account the availability of curriculum delivered across those platforms during school closures.

Even when children have the technology and tools at home, they may not be able to learn remotely through those platforms due to competing factors in the home, including pressure to do chores, being forced to work, a poor environment for learning and lack of support in using the online or broadcast curriculum, the report said.


Globally, 72% of school children unable to access remote learning live in their countries’ poorest households. Pinterest

Children from the poorest households and those living in rural areas are by far the most likely to miss out during closures, the report said.

Globally, 72 per cent of school children unable to access remote learning live in their countries’ poorest households. In upper-middle-income countries, school children from the poorest households account for up to 86 per cent of students unable to access remote learning, Unicef said.

Also Read: 78% Indian Parents Unwilling to Send their Wards to School Immediately Post Lockdown: Survey

Globally, three-quarters of school children without access live in rural areas.

The report highlighted significant inequality across regions, with school children in sub-Saharan Africa the most affected, where at least half of all students cannot be reached with remote learning.

It also noted varying rates of access across age groups, with the youngest students most likely to miss out on remote learning during their most critical years of learning and development. (IANS)


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