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The survey, titled ‘Campus Hiring 2019-20: Challenges, Trends & Best Practices', by talent assessment company Mercer|Mettl, said the biggest challenges the organisations faced were building pre-placement connection with students. Pixabay

More than 50 per cent campus recruiters face challenges with the existing hiring process, according to a survey on Tuesday.

The survey, titled ‘Campus Hiring 2019-20: Challenges, Trends & Best Practices’, by talent assessment company Mercer|Mettl, said the biggest challenges the organisations faced were building pre-placement connect and brand visibility with students. 55.41 per cent organisations termed it a challenge.


Similar number of organisations also said shortlisting the right set of campuses was a challenge.

“Through our latest report, we intend to highlight the existing and emerging trends that are shaping the campuses hiring landscape. The insights can help companies bridge the gap between the old and the new mechanisms, enhancing the rate, scale and quality of the talent they onboard,” said Siddhartha Gupta, CEO, Mercer|Mettl.


The report emphasises how the use of technology could turn out to be a game-changer for defining efficiency and scalability in campus recruitment through shortlisting target campuses. Pixabay

According to the report, 54.14 also voted logistics management and coordination with multiple campuses for multiple rounds as a challenge. 45.22 per cent ascertained that administration of right screening assessments for filtering candidates for interviews was a problem area.

Lastly, 38.85 per cent organisations said lower offer rollout to joining rate is a major concern.

The report also emphasises how the use of technology could turn out to be a game-changer for defining efficiency and scalability in recruitment through shortlisting target campuses, building pre-placement engagement, shortlisting resumes, rolling out screening assessments, and conducting interviews.

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Organisations that revamped the campus hiring methodologies by integrating innovative technologies into the process fared better than peers, the study said. Organisations that leveraged campus intelligence to enhance hiring strategy were able to increase their onboarding rate to 75 per cent, the survey said.

The study recorded responses from over 400 campus recruiters across sectors, including IT, manufacturing, healthcare, government, construction, entertainment and retail. (IANS)


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Intoday's time, if someone uses fountain pens, they are seen 'superior' or 'royal'.

Today, fountain pens are seen as aesthetic souvenirs. In fact, in today's time, if someone uses fountain pens, they are seen as 'superior' or 'royal'. Interestingly, there exists an astounding story behind the usage of fountain pens.

It is believed that the first mention of the fountain pen was in the year 973, when Ma'ād al-Mu'izz, who was the caliph of the Maghreb region of Northwest Africa, asked for a pen that would keep his hand clean while using it and would not leave ink marks. So, al-Mu'izz's wish was fulfilled when he received a pen that held the ink inside and could also be held upside-down without spilling the ink. Though, it must be noted that we are not quite aware of how this pen looked or worked.

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In Karnataka, parts of Gujarat and Maharashtra, and South India in general, making obbattu/ holige/ puran poli is a festive ritual. Known as Holige, more popularly in Kannada, this dish is eaten as a dessert because of its sweetness but can be eaten as a meal in itself because of its nutritious value.

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Kerala Kalamandalam admits girl students after 90 years

Kerala Kalamandalam that teaches the globally recognized art form of Kerala -- Kathakali, has for the first time in its history of 90 years, admitted girl students.

In class VII of Kalamadalam, out of 10 students admitted, 9 are girl students for its Kathakali course. Kathakali is a highly masculine art form with even the female characters being portrayed by men. The attempt is being welcomed across the world.

However several women had started practicing Kathakali in 1970 and 1990 and K.K. Gopalakrishnan, renowned art critic of Kerala in his research book, 'Kathakali Dance - Theatre', said that some women from foreign countries had trained for some short-term courses in Kerala on Kathakali.

Most of these performing women artists were either trained privately by Kathakali masters but this is the first time that Kalamandalam is taking in girl students for its long-term programme.

T.K. Narayanan, Vice-Chancellor, Kerala Kalamandalam told media persons that giving admission to girl students in Kalamadalam was a demand for several quarters since long and that this academic year the governing body has decided to give admission to girl students in a full-time programme at Kalamandalam.

Training at Kalamandalam from school days would expose the students to the teaching and guidance of experts and a diverse pool of teachers of the institute who have huge exposure and deep knowledge of the subject. (IANS/JB)


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