500-Year-Old carpenter’s skull recovered from Henry VIII’s warship goes Online in 3D as Part of Mary Rose Project

The skull is part of a collection of 3D scans of human remains, shoes, and tools of the Mary Rose's crew

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Henry VIII's warship Mary Rose. Source: Wikimedia Commons

LONDON, September 7, 2016: A carpenter’s skull recovered from Henry VIII’s warship the Mary Rose, which sank in battle in 1545, can now be viewed in 3D online – allowing the public to see his bad teeth and a head wound.

The skull is part of a collection of 3D scans of human remains, shoes, and tools which people who cannot make it to the ship’s museum home can see on www.virtualtudors.org.

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The detailed, interactive images are part of a bigger scientific project on the website aimed at researchers working in the field of bone science.

Nine other Mary Rose skulls can be viewed by archaeologists, osteologists and forensic anthropologists who will take part in a study into the usefulness of 3D models to the world of science.

While experts identify historic features of the virtual images hidden to the layman, ordinary users can still zoom in on the carpenter’s eyebrow wound and rotate to the image to see his bad teeth.

Source: VOA
Source: VOA

He would have been on board to carry out repairs which occurred during battle, like the one against an invading French fleet in 1545 during which the Mary Rose sunk off the south coast of England.

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After hunting for years, divers discovered the wreck in 1971, along with over 19,000 artifacts and the bones of 179 of its crew, providing historians with an insight into Tudor life at sea.

The ship was raised from the seabed in 1982 and is now on display at a museum in Portsmouth.

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GoI Directs Indian Navy and Air Force to Bring Back Citizens Stuck in Gulf Countries

Navy, IAF get ready to evacuate stranded citizens from Gulf nations

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Indian Navy and Air Force were briefed to get their machines ready in order to bring back the Indian citizens from the Gulf countries. Pixabay

The government has directed the Indian Navy to get their big sailing engines ready to bring back citizens stuck in the Gulf countries due to the coronavirus induced lockdown.

India has imposed a travel ban both within the country and oversees till May 3 to fight the Covid-19 outbreak. The directions were issued last week during a meeting of three service chiefs and the Chief of Defence Staff with Prime Minister Narendra Modi and other Cabinet members.

Navy and Air Force were briefed to get their machines ready in order to bring back the Indian citizens from the Gulf countries.

External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar had stated that the missions in the Gulf countries were liaisoning with local authorities to move Indian citizens to one place. The Indian missions there have opened the registration process for Indians who want to return.

The Indian Embassy in Qatar tweeted: “We are collecting data about the people requesting repatriation to India…. At this stage, the purpose is only to compile information. No decision or details yet on resumption of flights to India.”

indian navy rescue
The government has directed the Indian Navy to get their big sailing engines ready to bring back citizens stuck in the Gulf countries due to the coronavirus induced lockdown. Wikimedia Commons

It further stated that as and when a decision is taken, the Embassy will make a clear announcement. “Please note that the form has to be filled separately for each individual, even if they are members of a family,” the Embassy tweeted.

INS Jalashwa, an amphibious assault ship, and two Magar class tank-landing ships are being readied for the evacuation purposes.

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These ships have started making arrangements as per the standard protocols laid out to deal with suspected Covid-19 cases like social distancing and sanitisation. The Indian Navy has started removing non-essential equipment in order to accommodate the evacuees. These three ships can bring back around 2,000 people while maintaining social distancing.

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The Indian Air Force has been evacuating citizens from countries affected by Covid-19 frequently since January, which includes flights to China, Japan, Iran, Kuwait and Italy. The force has stated that it has kept C-17 Globemaster and C-130s on standby which can be used whenever they are required.

Apart from them, Air India flights are also being kept on standby to pick up stranded Indians from the Gulf countries. Earlier, the Navy had carried out evacuation efforts in war-torn areas like Lebanon (2006) and Yemen (2015). Before that, evacuation was carried in 1990 during the first Gulf War between Iraq and Kuwait when around 1.5 lakh people were evacuated. (IANS)

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Ricky Ponting Discloses the Bat with Which he Played his “Most Proud” Innings

Former Australia player Ricky Ponting tweeted a picture of the bat with which he played “ most proud” innings on Friday

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Ricky Ponting
Former Australia skipper Ricky Ponting on Friday posted picture of the bat. Wikimedia Commons

Former Australia skipper Ricky Ponting on Friday posted picture of the bat with which he played a knock of 156 against England in the 2005 Ashes Series – an innings which he is “most proud of” in his entire career.

“In the back half of my career I marked the hundreds I made on the handle of my bats under the grip. This is the bat I used when I made 156 against England at Manchester in the 2005 Ashes. It’s probably the innings I’m most proud of from my whole career,” Ponting said in a tweet along with two pictures of the bat.

In the third Test played in Manchester at the Old Trafford in the 2005 Ashes series, Ponting had played an unbelievable knock courtesy which Australia were able to draw the match.

Chasing 423 to win, Australia could manage to reach 371/9 on the final day before the match ended in a pulsating draw. It was an unbelievable last-wicket partnership between Brett Lee and Glenn McGrath — who remained unbeaten on 18 and 5 — that saved the match for the visitors.

England had won that Ashes series 2-1 against Australia. Australia had emerged victorious in the opening Test at Lord’s, but then the side went on to lose the second and fourth Test match.

Ricky Ponting bat
Ponting had said earlier that 2005 Ashes was one of the most enthralling contests that he has been part of in his entire career. Wikimedia Commons

Ponting had earlier said that 2005 Ashes was one of the most enthralling contests that he has been part of in his entire career.

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“It was my childhood dream to play some Ashes cricket. I have played in eight or nine Ashes series so there are some fond memories and then there are some which are not that fond memories,” the former Australian skipper had said in Instagram video he uploaded after David Warner’s request.

“One such not so fond memory includes the 2005 Ashes series, where we were beaten by Michael Vaughan’s England. It was probably one of the all-time great series, Vaughan’s team was too good. We won the first Test at Lord’s but then came the Edgbaston Test, it was one of the all-time great Tests and we came up short, then in the third Test we had to battle it out for a draw,” he added.(IANS)

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Indian Navy, Restructuring its Organisational Setup to Cater to Advancements in its Military and Technical Systems

As per Navy sources, the proposal was discussed at length at the recently concluded Navy Commander's Conference in New Delhi

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Indian, Navy, Military
As per a senior Navy official, the re-orientation will result in functional re-organisation and optimal manning of its platforms by efficiently utilising the lean manpower. Pixabay

Indian Navy, the leanest of the three armed forces of the country, is contemplating restructuring its organisational setup to cater to the advancements in its military and technical systems.

The re-orientation is proposed as the force is acquiring systems with super-special technologies equipped on platforms, including new ships, frigates and submarines. As per a senior Navy official, the re-orientation will result in functional re-organisation and optimal manning of its platforms by efficiently utilising the lean manpower at its disposal.

As per Navy sources, the proposal was discussed at length at the recently concluded Navy Commander’s Conference in New Delhi.

At present, the Navy’s staff strength is 56,000, which includes 5,600 officers. In comparison, the staff strength of the Air Force is 1.5 lakh and the Army, 13 lakh.

Indian, Navy, Military
The re-orientation is proposed as the force is acquiring systems with super-special technologies equipped on platforms, including new ships, frigates and submarines. Pixabay

“Discussions are underway to develop an organisational structure based on the Operator-Maintainer concept of the US Navy. In this concept, the operator of any system on a particular platform is technically qualified to undertake the first line of maintenance of that system,” said a senior Navy official.

However, given the technical complexities involved in operation of new systems on board any platform, technical knowledge is required.

“To acquire crew with the requisite technical knowledge, the Navy is contemplating on altering their training methodologies and even recruiting staff with the necessary education backgrounds,” said the official.

Indian ships typically have two sets of crew. There are sets of ‘operators’ to run systems, like radars, a fire control systems or guns. There are separate sets of ‘maintainers’ whose services are called in when any of the systems malfunction. The ‘operator-maintainer’ concept would mean overlapping of technically complex functionalities.

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As per experts, Russian ships too follow the operator-maintainer concept. Russian platforms were witness to massive overcrowding when they were inducted into the Indian Navy because these were designed to accommodate only a limited number of persons. The Royal Navy of the UK has tried this system on its ships too.

“In the operator-maintainer concept, each person has to be technically qualified because maintaining a modern platform is complex. There are two issues involved for India in adopting this system. The existing crew has to be trained with much higher level of technical competence.

After merging of functions, leaves available to any staff, which is around three months a year, have to be curtailed. Another issue pertains to the costs involved in training the staff. There has been a trend among officials quitting the Navy after 15 years of service for lucrative jobs in other sectors of the economy,” former Navy chief Admiral Arun Prakash told IANS. (IANS)

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