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500-Year-Old carpenter’s skull recovered from Henry VIII’s warship goes Online in 3D as Part of Mary Rose Project

The skull is part of a collection of 3D scans of human remains, shoes, and tools of the Mary Rose's crew

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Henry VIII's warship Mary Rose. Source: Wikimedia Commons
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LONDON, September 7, 2016: A carpenter’s skull recovered from Henry VIII’s warship the Mary Rose, which sank in battle in 1545, can now be viewed in 3D online – allowing the public to see his bad teeth and a head wound.

The skull is part of a collection of 3D scans of human remains, shoes, and tools which people who cannot make it to the ship’s museum home can see on www.virtualtudors.org.

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The detailed, interactive images are part of a bigger scientific project on the website aimed at researchers working in the field of bone science.

Nine other Mary Rose skulls can be viewed by archaeologists, osteologists and forensic anthropologists who will take part in a study into the usefulness of 3D models to the world of science.

While experts identify historic features of the virtual images hidden to the layman, ordinary users can still zoom in on the carpenter’s eyebrow wound and rotate to the image to see his bad teeth.

Source: VOA
Source: VOA

He would have been on board to carry out repairs which occurred during battle, like the one against an invading French fleet in 1545 during which the Mary Rose sunk off the south coast of England.

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After hunting for years, divers discovered the wreck in 1971, along with over 19,000 artifacts and the bones of 179 of its crew, providing historians with an insight into Tudor life at sea.

The ship was raised from the seabed in 1982 and is now on display at a museum in Portsmouth.

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Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

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A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

Archeology , Neolithic artefacts. england
Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

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The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)