Monday May 28, 2018

How Sedeibereni craftsmen in Odisha are keeping the lost Dhokra art alive

0
//
174
Republish
Reprint

WP_20150305_007

By Prateek Kumar

In a small hamlet named Sedeibereni lives Dhanasur Behra, who has dedicated his life to conserve the dying art of Dhokra (Crafting metal statuette with the aid of wax). He and his family work at a meager wage of about $50 a month to create beautifully crafted and imaginative pieces of metal depicting the cultural and multilingual diversities of India.

Like Behra there are a few other craftsmen who are struggling everyday to conserve this 200 year old legacy.

Settled near the temple of Saptasajya in Odisha, Sadeibereni is a forgotten land which is admired for its ancient art forms.  The village and their oblivious art is the only source of their income which is now disappearing from the spectacle.

Sedeibereni craftsmen mould simple yet obscure designs of little elephants, show pieces and idols of Ganesh and Lakshmi which they sell for a modest price of $50-60 per kilogram. Ironically, their work of art is sold at almost $200-250 in the cities like Delhi and Mumbai.

Molding idols and dreams

These sculptures and idols which weigh about one or two kilograms are created through hand spinning the wax wires around the mold, after which they are rubbed on the buffing machine for a polished look.  A single sculpture takes 15 days for its completion and is sold for three thousand to Indian customers and six to seven thousand to foreigners. “Sometimes it takes several months for us to sell a single piece as there is no tourism in this part of Odisha. We are a family of seven and earns three thousand a month which makes our lives really hard” says Babita, Dhanasur’s wife and co-worker.

Even after facing such hardships, Sadeibereni craftsmen find content in their work. For them the survival of the art matters more than the money.

“Once I went to London along with few others from our village to teach this discarded style of making sculptures. But still we live like a stranger in our own land and no one praises us. We are still fighting for bread and butter” Dhanasur says.

Each piece is different from the other. Unlike the classical tradition of metal casting the Dhokra craftsman gives free bridle to his thoughts that led the mixture of metals from scraps to make objects of Utilitarian and ritualistic purpose for several communities.

Government’s support

The village which is a home for more than hundred skilled craftsmen, exports these carvings to metro cities like Delhi, Mumbai, Pune, Jaipur etc. “The state government has been very supportive in the endeavor to promote this artwork, they even provide them financial support whenever required along with medical and shelter facilities under Indira Awaas Yojana ” says Birendra, a dealer.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Study Shows Autistic Traits Behind Revolution in Ice Age Art

The ability to focus on detail, a common trait among people with autism, allowed realistic art to flourish 30,000 years ago during the ice age, according to researchers. Ice age ancestors have created exceptionally realistic art including the extremely accurate depictions of bears, bison, horses, and lions.

0
//
13
Mammoth Cave National Park preserves the cave system and a part of the Green River valley and hilly country of south central Kentucky. This is the world's longest cave system, with more than 365 miles explored. Image: Wikimedia Commons

The ability to focus on detail, a common trait among people with autism, allowed realistic art to flourish 30,000 years ago during the ice age, according to researchers.

Ice age ancestors have created exceptionally realistic art including the extremely accurate depictions of bears, bison, horses and lions.

Autistic Child lighting a candle
Autistic Child lighting a candle, pixabay

While many have argued that psychotropic drugs were behind the detailed illustrations, the new study argued instead that individuals with “detail focus” — a trait linked to autism, kicked off an artistic movement that led to the proliferation of realistic cave drawings across Europe.

“Detail focus is what determines whether you can draw realistically; you need it in order to be a talented realistic artist. This trait is found very commonly in people with autism and rarely occurs in people without it,” said lead author Penny Spikins from Britain’s University of York.

“We looked at the evidence from studies attempting to identify a link between artistic talent and drug use and found that drugs can only serve to disinhibit individuals with a pre-existing ability. The idea that people with a high degree of detail focus, many of which may have had autism, set a trend for extreme realism in ice age art is a more convincing explanation,” Spikins added.

The research adds to a growing body of evidence that people with autistic traits played an important role in human evolution.

Art Therapy for Autistic Children
Art Therapy for Autistic Children, pixabay

“Individuals with this trait — both those who would be diagnosed with autism in the modern day and those that wouldn’t — likely played an important part in human evolution and survival as we colonized Europe,” Spikins said.

Also Read: New Study Shows That Binaries From Globular Clusters Can be Detected by LISA

Besides, contributing to early culture, people with the attention to detail would also have had the focus to create complex tools from materials such as bone, rock and wood, the study showed.

“These skills became increasingly important in enabling us to adapt to the harsh environments we encountered in Europe,” Spikins noted. (IANS)

Next Story