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Archeologists Unearth 6,000 years old Neolithic remains in Istanbul during a new Metro line Construction

Discovery may disclose significant information about the early settlement alongside the strait. Strait, one of the world's most important sea routes connecting the Black Sea and the Aegean Sea

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Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia
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Istanbul, August 22, 2017: Archeologists have unearthed Neolithic remains believed to be dating back to 6,000 years during a new metro line construction in central Istanbul.

Neolithic circular structures and urn type burials were discovered by the Istanbul Archeology Museum experts at the construction site of the subway station in Besiktas district, Xinhua news agency reported.

According to the experts, the discovery will reveal important information that would shed light on the history of Istanbul and the Bosphorus Strait separating the city’s Asian and European sides.

“This discovery located at the very center of the city will definitely fill an important gap in the history of the region between 6,500 and 3,000s B.C.,” Itir Bayburtluoglu, an archeologist told Xinhua.

“I believe it will disclose significant information about the early settlement alongside the strait, one of the world’s most important sea routes connecting the Black Sea and the Aegean Sea,” she said.

In April, archaeologists have first unearthed some 19th and 20th-century ruins at the same site.

Following that discovery, the authorities have slightly shifted the location of the metro station allowing the experts to dig further the bottom layers.

In Bayburtluoglu’s view, the site likely hosts more artifacts belonging to the earlier periods and they could be retrieved as the excavations move forward. (IANS)

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Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

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A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

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Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

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The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)

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