Wednesday July 17, 2019

63% Indians Now Want to Replace Meat With Plant-Based Food

Ipsos, an independent market research company, carried out the survey between August 24-September 7, 2018 in 29 countries. The sample size for the survey in India was 1,000, it said

0
//
Study: Meat Based Diet can Improve Infant Growth.
63% Indians want to replace meat with plant-based food: Report. Pixabay

As the country grapples with health-related issues such as diabetes, healthier food choices might be the flavour of the season with a poll showing that around 63 per cent Indians (now want) eat plant-based food in place of meat.

An Ipsos report ‘Food Habits of Indians: Ipsos Study’ observed that Indians are making informed choices, experimenting and moving away from norms.

“We know that Indians love their food and would drool for specialties like tandoori chicken, mutton and fish and their various non-vegetarian avatars. But 63 per cent of Indians polled say that are willing to eat a plant-based substitute for meat,” the report said on Monday.

Expert: Red Meat, Pork Improve Fertility
Eat less meat to meet climate targets, claims study. Pixabay

As per the report, 57 per cent of the people surveyed consume organic foods.

“57 per cent Indians claim to be consuming organic food. In sharp contrast, the developed world is least likely to eat organic food — only 12 per cent of Brits and 13 per cent of Japanese, for instance,” it said.

Also Read- Apple Launches Fitness Apps on Apple Watch Series 4 For Marathon Season

Ipsos, an independent market research company, carried out the survey between August 24-September 7, 2018 in 29 countries. The sample size for the survey in India was 1,000, it said.  (IANS)

Next Story

More Indians Getting Fatter but Fewer Undernourished

Meanwhile, there was a drop in the number of undernourished Indians from 253.9 million in 2004-06 to 217 million in 2010-12

0
The number of obese adults has gone up in India from 24.1 million in 2012 to 32.8 million in 2016. Pixabay

More Indians are getting fatter but fewer are undernourished as the nation goes from lessening the impact of hunger to developing the new health issue of obesity, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation.

The number of obese adults has gone up in India from 24.1 million in 2012 to 32.8 million in 2016, according to The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2019 report released on Monday.

Meanwhile, there was a drop in the number of undernourished Indians from 253.9 million in 2004-06 to 217 million in 2010-12, and 194.4 million in 2016-18, according to FAO reports.

The number of Indian children under five years who were overweight was 2.4 million last year, while 46 million were stunted, according to the report.

Indians, Fatter, Undernourished
More Indians are getting fatter but fewer are undernourished as the nation goes from lessening the impact of hunger to developing the new health issue of obesity. Pixabay

Globally the number of obese adults has gone up from 563.7 million in 2012 to 672.3 million in 2016, the report said.

FAO Director-General Jose Graziano da Silva said at the news conference releasing the report that obesity was a growing problem worldwide, becoming almost an epidemic especially among children. The globalcosts related with the problems associated with obesity is about $2 trillion, almost as much as the price tobacco exacts in health and other costs, he said.

He said countries will have to control the obesity problem through taxation of sugar, fat and salt, providing healthier foods, and ensuring that consumers get the right information about food products.

Children should be given fresh food and healthy breakfasts instead of cereals with high sugar content, he added.

Also Read- Researchers: Video Games can Help Children Evaluate, Express and Manage Emotions

The report said that an increase in the unemployment rate in India has possibly increased food insecurity, which is lack of consistent access to food with people being forced to reduce at times the amount they consume.

Food insecurity has increased in Southern Asia “from less than 11 per cent in 2017 to more than 14 per cent in 2018”, the report said. “This possibly reflects an increase in the unemployment rate in India between 2017 and 2018”.

“In the Indian Himalayas, economic slowdown coupled with natural resource depletion and climate change negatively impacted on food production and employment opportunities. This resulted in increased threats to food security due to lower purchasing power,” it added.

The number of undernourished people around the world has come down from 947 million (14.5 per cent of the global population) in 2005 to 821.6 million (10.8 per cent) last year. But it has been rising slowly since 2010, when it was down to 785.4 million (10.6 per cent), mainly because of the situation in Africa. (IANS)