Tuesday May 21, 2019
Home India 7 cops suspen...

7 cops suspended after Dalit children burnt alive in Haryana

0
//

Faridabad/Chandigarh: A day after two Dalit children were burnt alive while their parents were reported to be critical when the house of a family in a village in Haryana’s Faridabad district was set on fire on Tuesday allegedly by members of an upper caste community, seven policemen who were deployed for the security of Dalits have been suspended.

According to reports, the suspended policemen were part of a team deployed for the security of Dalits after a similar attack took place in Sun Perh village near Ballabgarh about a year ago.

Meanwhile, Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi, apart from Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) and CPI-M leaders, on Wednesday paid a visit to the Dalit family in the hamlet amidst protests by the villagers against the killing of the children.

Three of the 11 accused in the case have been arrested.

The house of Jitender in Sun Perh village near Ballabgarh was set on fire by unidentified people after dousing it with petrol.

Villagers Dushyant and Vipin said that Jitender, his wife Rekha, four-year-old son Vaibhav and eight-month-old daughter Divya were rushed to Delhi’s Safdarjung hospital.

Police said that Vaibhav and Divya succumbed to burn injuries, while giving their age as two years and nine months respectively.

“Some criminals burnt a Jatav family of village Sun Perh, police station Sadar Ballabhgarh of Faridabad district, when they were sleeping inside their house. Four members including Jitender, his wife Rekha and two small children namely Vaibhav (son) aged 2 years and Divya (daughter) aged 9 months were inside the room. Subsequently, the fire spread inside the room and both the children expired. Jitender and his wife Rekha also sustained burn injuries,” said a police spokesman in Chandigarh.

The injured were admitted in General Hospital, Ballabgarh, and then were referred to Safdarjung Hospital, he said.

Police have booked 11 people for murder, attempt to murder and other sections of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) and SC/ST Act.

Police said that an incident that took place on October 5, 2014, when three people were killed in clashes between two groups of the village, may have led to Tuesday’s arson.

As many as 19 people were booked for triple murder including three members of Jitender’s family after the 2014 violence.

The accused persons were arrested, the charge sheet submitted in the court on January 3 and the case is under trial, the police spokesman said.

Following tension in the village, all shops were closed and heavy police force was deployed in the area.

Deputy Commissioner of Police, Ballabgarh, Bhupinder Singh said that the situation in the area was tense but under control.

In Chandigarh, a state government spokesman said that three accused – Balwant, Dharam Singh and Kartar of Ballabgarh – have been arrested.

He said that four policemen, who were among the seven police personnel deployed with the victim family for security, have been suspended.

“Constables Bali Mohammed, Vikas and Sandeep have been placed under suspension for dereliction of duties because they failed to protect the victims as they were deployed for the security of victim’s family.

“Inspector Anil Kumar, officer-in-charge of police station Sadar Ballagbarh, has been placed under suspension for dereliction of duties. The situation is at present under control,” the spokesman said.

Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh expressed concern over the killing of the two children and asked Haryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar to prevent recurrence of such incidents.

“In a telephonic conversation with the chief minister, the home minister expressed concern over the killing and asked the Haryana chief minister to ensure security to everyone and prevent any recurrence of such incident. The home minister also sought a report from the state administration,” an official said.

Khattar expressed shock over the incident and announced financial assistance of Rs.10 lakh to the family.

(With inputs from IANS)

Next Story

Sell Charcoal to Buy Food: North Korean Children on Street To Support Themselves

“The children are so diligent and determined. People are astonished because they are out on the streets even before the roosters have crowed, shouting ‘charcoal for sale!” said the source.

0
Children hold flowers as they pay their respects before the giant bronze statues of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jong Il during the anniversary of the end of World War II and liberation from Japanese colonial rule in Pyongyang, North Korea on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018. North Korea has marked the anniversary with a series of ceremonies ahead of what is expected to be a much bigger event next month, the 70th anniversary of its national foundation day. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)RFERL

North Korean teenagers in some areas of the country are giving up their studies to take menial jobs because their parents cannot adequately provide for them, while authorities who know about the problem aren’t taking any steps to help, sources in affected areas said.

A source from South Pyongan province told RFA’s Korean Service in an interview Thursday that hungry teens are turning to peddling charcoal used for cooking to support themselves.

“Recently in provincial cities, including Pyongsong, there has been a sudden increase in the number of teenagers selling charcoal for a living,” the source said.

“With the money their parents make, eating three meals a day is difficult, so they become street peddlers.”

Peddling charcoal is a fairly easy business to get into, because it can be done by practically everyone and it requires no seed money, the source explained.

“Kids who sell the charcoals are mostly middle school and high school students. Some of them are elementary school students who are not even 10 years old,” the source said.

But the source noted that although getting into the business is easy, the job itself is not.

“They carry bags of charcoal much bigger than they are, on their back, and they start selling it from dawn,” the source said, adding, “Then they will walk more than 4 kilometers (about 2.5 miles) to get more charcoal so they can sell it the next day, then walk back home. It’s really hard work,” said the source.

charcoal
“You can see the teenagers selling charcoal very early in the morning in residential areas of the rural communities near Ryongchon town,” said the source. Pixabay

“These kids have to sell all the charcoal they have if they want to buy food for the next day, so even before dawn they are walking around the densely populated neighborhood with their charcoal bags on their back,” the source said. According to the source the kids can sell the charcoal for 1,500 North Korean won (19 cents) per kilo.

The source said that the best time to sell charcoal is in the morning, because this is when housewives need to start preparing food for the day before they go to the local market.

“They walk around shouting “Charcoal for sale!” in the neighborhoods at 5am, breaking the silence of apartments and residences, and stirring up sympathy.”

While charcoal is a needed commodity, it is the sympathy for the children that most likely drives sales.

“People in the neighborhood feel pity, so they come down from their apartment to buy charcoal from these children,” said a second source from North Pyongan province.

“You can see the teenagers selling charcoal very early in the morning in residential areas of the rural communities near Ryongchon town,” said the source.

The source said that the locals are amazed at the work ethic of the charcoal-selling teens.

“The children are so diligent and determined. People are astonished because they are out on the streets even before the roosters have crowed, shouting ‘charcoal for sale!” said the source.

“When a customer lives on a high floor of an apartment building, the children tell them they will deliver it to their door. Even for customers who buy only a kilogram, the children will walk up all the stairs,” the source said, adding “They’ll do anything for the money.”

charcoal
“They walk around shouting “Charcoal for sale!” in the neighborhoods at 5am, breaking the silence of apartments and residences, and stirring up sympathy.” Pixabay

But as impressed as the people might be with the enterprising youth, they are angry that economic conditions are forcing the youth to work so hard just to eat.

Also Read: Micro-blogging Site Twitter Now Lets You Re-tweet with GIFS, Images and Videos

“People are resentful against the government because these are children who need to [be at school] trying to achieve their dreams, but here they are selling charcoal or doing other kinds of day-to-day labor,” the source said.

“Meanwhile the government makes false propaganda that North Korean children are living healthy happy lives.” (RFA)