Sunday February 24, 2019

7 Days Challenge: Not ‘Eat, pray, love’ but ‘Eat, move, live’

According to the website of the Challenge, its objectives are: To emphasise the role of individual action for sustainable development.

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The motto of 7 days challenge is to, 'live, eat and move.' Wikimedia Commons
The motto of 7 days challenge is to, 'live, eat and move.' Wikimedia Commons
  • The 7-day challenge focuses on practice of living a sustainable life
  • The idea is for people to start living a smart and healthy life
  • It will not only benefit individuals but the country they are living in as a whole

Want to eat healthier? Or move around town in a more sustainable manner? Or just lead your daily life in a smarter way? You need to try the 7 Days Challenge.

The Swedish Embassy here, in association with the TERI School of Advanced Studies, has organised the Challenge targeting youth from classes 9 to 12 in schools and graduate and post-graduate students in colleges across the national capital from January 17 to 23.

Also Read: Energy drinks tied to serious brain injuries in teens

The Challenge is basically a call to action for the participants to practise sustainable lifestyles and consists of seven days of practical sustainable solutions focusing on three categories: Eat, move and live.

“The 7 Days Challenge is an attempt really for a short period of time trying to encourage people to think, eat, live, move smartly and sustainably and doing so in a short period of time and in encouraging best practices and also creativity around sub-solutions,” Swedish Ambassador Klas Molin told IANS, explaining the concept.

“Coming up with new ideas, not just emulating, copying which is being done, but thinking creatively,” he said, adding that in the first round, young people who are using modern technologies and thinking in new ways and whose future will be more impacted by today’s choices, have been targeted.

After Kenya and Indonesia, India is the third country where this challenge has been organised. Pixabay
After Kenya and Indonesia, India is the third country where this challenge has been organised. Pixabay

India is the third country, after Kenya and Indonesia, where the 7 Days Challenge is being organised.

But why seven days?

“Calling it the 7 Days Challenge, I think, partly is psychological, that it is a manageable period of time,” Molin said.

“Surely we can all devote a week to living smarter, thinking more consciously and acting, travelling and shopping more sustainably. It is a reasonable, manageable amount of time.”

According to the website of the Challenge, its objectives are: To emphasise the role of individual action for sustainable development; to spread awareness about the need for adopting practical sustainable solutions and lifestyles at the individual level; to build individual capacity and motivate individuals to improvise and innovate their choices and lifestyle towards more sustainable ones; and improve their own quality of life.

Also Read: Remain healthy during winter with these healthy tips 

Explaining the concept of eating, move and live, Ambassador Molin referred to a kitchen garden within the Swedish Embassy compound in terms of “eat”.

“Many people believe in growing their own vegetables right next door. It is not only nice to look at, it is very practical, it is healthy,” he said. In terms of “move”, he gave his own example and said that back home in Sweden he bicycled to school and then to work in professional life almost every day.

“Since I was in middle school or junior high school, I biked to school and back. I biked to work.”

The 7 days challenge is all about living a healthy and sustainable life. Wikimedia Commons
The 7 days challenge is all about living a healthy and sustainable living. Wikimedia Commons

Molin asserted that biking is “certainly the fastest and most convenient way” of getting about a modern city like Sweden’s capital Stockholm. Here in the Swedish Embassy, he said, staff members and colleagues are encouraged to carpool more, including with his own official car.

In terms of “live”, Molin again gave the example of the Embassy and said the building was fitted with solar panels. He also said that a system has been developed within the Embassy complex — which only uses LED lights — to create composts by pooling in all organic waste.

“We have pipes under the park, under the paved area and also in the back and all the rainwater or most of the rainwater is collected underground,” Molin said. “It’s rainwater harvesting and we use it during the dry season for irrigation and watering.”

“We want to be champions in combating climate change. We want to be at the forefront, on the cusp of development when it comes to living, eating and moving smarter and conserving energy and preserving our pristine nature.”

Molin said that the last few governments from all walks of the political spectrum in Sweden have embraced these issues.

Riding bicycles is one thing which the 'move' aspect of the challenge focuses on. westbrookcyclesdiscountcode2015.wordpress.com
Riding bicycles is one thing which the ‘move’ aspect of the challenge focuses on. westbrookcyclesdiscountcode2015.wordpress.com

“We have very progressive policies regarding incentives and disincentives when it comes to vehicles… We just introduced of January 1 new rules as to taxation of private vehicles where there are great incentives for going electric, hybrid, etc. And stronger disincentives in using older technology and older cars.”

The Ambassador also pointed out that Sweden has managed to have continuous GDP growth while at the same time cutting down on CO2 emissions. “So, growth is not contingent on old technologies and you know pumping out pollution. You can achieve growth in a smart way,” he asserted. As for the 7 Days Challenge, the participant who comes up with the most innovative idea or solution will be awarded. IANS

Next Story

Researchers Identify Climate-friendly Diets Are Also Healthier

"We can have both. We can have healthier diets and reduce our food-related emissions. And it doesn't require the extreme of eliminating foods entirely," Rose said.

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The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons
The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons

After examining the carbon footprint of what more than 16,000 Americans eat in a day, researchers have identified that more climate-friendly diets are also healthier, according to a study.

“People whose diets had a lower carbon footprint were eating less red meat and dairy — which contribute to a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions and are high in saturated fat — and consuming more healthy foods like poultry, whole grains and plant-based proteins,” said lead author Diego Rose from the Tulane University in New Orleans.

For the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers built an extensive database of the greenhouse gas emissions related to the production of foods and linked it to a large federal survey that asked people what they ate over a 24-hour period.

They ranked diets by the amount of greenhouse gas emissions per 1,000 calories consumed and divided them into five equal groups.

Then they rated the nutritional value of foods consumed in each diet using the US Healthy Eating Index, a federal measure of diet quality, and compared the lowest to the highest-impact groups on this and other measures.

Americans in the lowest carbon footprint group ate a healthier diet, as measured by this index. However, these diets also contained more of some low-emission items that aren’t healthy, namely added sugars and refined grains.

diet, bipolar
Climate-friendly diets are also healthier: Study. Flickr

They also had lower amounts of important nutrients — such as iron, calcium, and vitamin D — likely because of the lower intakes of meat and dairy.

According to the researcher, overall, diets in the lowest impact group were healthier, but not on all measures. This is because diets are complex with many ingredients that each influence nutritional quality and environmental impacts.

Diets in the highest impact group accounted for five times the emissions of those in the lowest impact group. The highest impact diets had greater quantities of meat (beef, veal, pork and game), dairy and solid fats per 1000 calories than the low-impact diets.

Also Read- About 8,000 Facebook Users Die Daily, is Your Digital Will Ready?

“We can have both. We can have healthier diets and reduce our food-related emissions. And it doesn’t require the extreme of eliminating foods entirely,” Rose said.

“For example, if we reduce the amount of red meat in our diets, and replace it with other protein foods such as chicken, eggs, or beans, we could reduce our carbon footprint and improve our health at the same time.” (IANS)