Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Living a healthy lifestyle is the key to a healthy life. Pixabay

The Covid-19 pandemic has changed Indians’ outlook on health as 70 percent of Indians say they will prioritize dietary and lifestyle changes in 2021 to manage both emotional and physical health, according to a survey.

It added that 60 percent of Indians say that they will de-prioritize going to a gym. For 73 percent of Indians, taste reigns supreme in their decision to buy food products and poor taste of health products is an obstacle to making the right dietary choices, said the finding by Habitt.


Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated about the World news.

A majority of Indians – 71 percent, felt that their health is worse off today than pre-Covid-19 due to broken eating and fitness habits. There are a number of reasons cited as barriers to better health. These are a lack of time, poor taste of healthy products, and confusing technical details of healthy products exaggerated by the inability to make a choice among the various options. 72 percent of survey respondents cite lack of time while 66 percent cite the poor taste of healthy items to be their biggest obstacle.

100 percent of the survey respondents correctly identified what are healthy foods versus junk foods indicating very high awareness about the ill effects of unhealthy options that are full of fats or sugars. However, a bulk – 73 percent, highlighted that they would still consume unhealthy options since they are tasty, convenient, and part of their daily lifestyle. Taste thus reigns supreme in the decision to buy food and a majority still prefers tasty foods that also have nutritional benefits, over healthy foods that may not taste good.


A few changes in your dietary and lifestyle can lead to a healthy life. Pixabay

As per the survey, 70 percent of respondents show a higher inclination than before towards improving their health through dietary changes, whereas nearly one in four, 26 percent would also like to make meditation a higher priority. 65 percent also indicate their increased reliance on medical and nutritional experts to help achieve their goals. More than 60 percent of Indians have a reduced priority than earlier towards traditional gyms and fitness centers, owing to social distancing and avoidance of communal areas in Covid-19 and would prefer to exercise at home or do alternate physical activities like running, cycling or aerobics.

“The survey highlights that the myth that diet is secondary to exercise in the health journey, is beginning to crumble, with respondents realizing the importance of nutrition and prioritizing changes in diet over exercise to achieve better physical and mental health. This is the new normal,” said Dhruv Bhushan, Co-founder & CEO, Habbit.

He added: “As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to shift consumer habits towards being more health-conscious, there is an opportunity for food and nutrition companies to win on taste and fuel healthier lifestyles.”

ALSO READ: Religious People Less Likely To Suffer Depression and Anxiety: Says Study

“Good nutrition is vital to a healthy lifestyle and is one of the most singularly important factors in overall health. The food we eat literally becomes who we are, and influences our physical, mental, and even emotional well-being. Complemented with physical activity, it helps to maintain a discipline of the body as well as the mind. If the body feels good, the mind will feel good! The pandemic has brought the importance of this balance to the center,” says nutritionist and wellness coach Avni Kaul, and the founder of Nutri Activania, which helps people discover ‘nutrition for an active life’. Avni was the diet advisor to the Indian contingent during the preparatory session for the Buenos Aires Summer Youth Olympic Games in 2018.

The online survey was conducted in the last quarter of 2020 with 2,428 adults across metros in India. All respondents are in the age group of 22-56 years and have an annual household income of more than Rs 10 lakh. (IANS)


Popular

VOA

Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram logos are displayed in this illustration taken October 4, 2021.

Facebook says it plans to hire 10,000 workers in the European Union over the next five years to work on a new computing platform.

The company said in a blog post Sunday that those high-skilled workers will help build "the metaverse," a futuristic notion for connecting people online that encompasses augmented and virtual reality.

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia Commons

The most popular version of the rhyme/lullaby

As children, singing the rhyme Rock A Bye Baby was a fun thing to do. It was a statement of thrill and adventure to imagine a child climbing to the top of a tree and rocking to sleep. Especially in the Indian context, rocking a baby to sleep by attaching the cradle to the tree is quite a common thing. But the origin of this rhyme, or lullaby, seems rooted in other histories.

The most popular notion associated with this lullaby is of women leaving their babies tied to tree branches, rocking to sleep with the wind. It is believed that at the time this lullaby was written, it was inspired by a coloniser who saw the Native American women tie their children in birch bark cradles to the trees. The babies went to sleep rocked by the gusts of wind while the parents went about their tasks.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

This image released by Disney Theatrical Productions shows, from second left, Michael James Scott as Genie, Michael Maliakel as Aladdin, and Shoba Narayan as Jasmine after a performance of the Broadway musical "Aladdin" in New York on Sept. 28, 2021

As kids growing up in different states, Shoba Narayan and Michael Maliakel shared a love of one favorite film — "Aladdin." Both are of Indian descent, and in the animated movie, they saw people who looked like them.

That shared love has gone full-circle this month as Narayan and Maliakel lead the Broadway company of the musical "Aladdin" out of the pandemic, playing Princess Jasmine and the hero from the title, respectively.

Keep reading... Show less