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Just 8.7 Per cent of Homes in South Asia Have an IoT Device

The findings are scheduled to be presented at the Usenix Security Conference 2019 to be held in California, US from August 14-16

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There is an explosion of the Internet of Things (IoT), Blockchain and other disruptive technologies. Flickr

Just 8.7 per cent of homes in South Asia have Internet of Things (IoT) or “connected” devices such as Internet-enabled TVs or surveillance camera against a global average of 40 per cent, new research said on Monday.

In North America, on the other hand, 66 per cent households now have at least one IoT device, said the study conducted by cyberseucirty firm Avast in collaboration with Stanford University.

The researchers found that media devices like smart TVs are most common in seven of 11 global regions but there is significant variance otherwise.

For example, surveillance cameras are most popular in South and Southeast Asia, while work appliances prevail in East Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Home assistants are present in 10 per cent of homes in North America but are yet to see significant adoption in other markets.

While nearly half of North American homes have an Internet-connected TV or streaming device, less than three per cent do in South Asia, the findings showed.

IoT
Picture Courtesy:-industrialtrainingjalandhar.net

For the study, Avast scanned 83 million IoT devices in 16 million homes worldwide to understand the distribution and security profile of IoT devices by type and manufacturer.

It revealed that even with over 14,000 IoT manufacturers worldwide, 94 per cent of all IoT devices are manufactured by just 100 vendors.

“A key finding of this paper is that 94 per cent of the home IoT devices were made by fewer than 100 vendors, and half are made by just ten vendors,” said Rajarshi Gupta, Head of AI at Avast.

Also Read: Microsoft Ready to Help Indian Startups, Says President Anant Maheshwari

“This puts these manufacturers in a unique position to ensure that consumers have access to devices with strong privacy and security by design,” Gupta said.

Over seven per cent of all IoT devices still use obsolete protocols like FTP and Telnet, making them especially vulnerable.

The findings are scheduled to be presented at the Usenix Security Conference 2019 to be held in California, US from August 14-16. (IANS)

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Homes Destroyed, Residents Evicted in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City

Authorities in Vietnam have long repressed the Catholic Church in the one-party communist state and subjected it to forced evictions, land grabs, and attacks on priests and their followers, sources say

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Demolition teams go to work in the Loc Hung Vegetable Garden settlement on Jan. 8, 2019.

Authorities in southern Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City have demolished at least 112 houses in a parcel of land claimed by the Catholic Church, forcing many residents from their homes, Vietnamese sources say.

The two-day operation on Jan. 4 and Jan. 8 in the Tan Binh district’s Loc Hung Vegetable Garden settlement took residents, including political dissidents and veterans of the former Army of South Vietnam, completely by surprise, some of those evicted told RFA’s Vietnamese Service on Thursday.

“They sent about a thousand people here, including uniformed forces and people wearing masks,” one source told RFA.

“They used bulldozers and earth movers, around eight in total, to demolish our houses,” the source said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

“I had never seen anything like that before, and I prayed that things would be OK, but they tore my house down anyway,” he said.

Also speaking to RFA, another former resident said that authorities had not warned settlement residents they would be forced from their homes.

“We didn’t hear anything about this from government officials. We had only heard rumors,” the source said, also speaking on condition his name not be used.

“They should have told us this was going to happen so that we could move our possessions. Now we have to live on the street. Where can we go?”

Many of those displaced from their homes were disabled veterans of the former South Vietnamese army, with some confined to wheelchairs, another source said, adding, “Crying, they asked me if their houses were going to be destroyed. I could only tell them I didn’t know.”

‘Illegal dwellings’

State media on Thursday said no forced evictions had taken place, and that only illegally built houses had been taken down, with those turned out of their homes offered temporary dwellings by the district along with VND $3 million (U.S. $120) a month for three months while they look for new homes.

“What district leaders told state media is completely wrong,” though, Cao Ha Chanh—a Loc Hung resident since 1954—told RFA.

“That land was allotted to people who had escaped the [Communist] regime in the North in 1954,” he said.

Registered for agricultural use in 1991, 1995, and 2005, the land had been used by residents for growing vegetables ever since, sources said.

Speaking to RFA, Vietnamese lawyer Pham Cong Ut said that state authorities had been wrong to take away residents’ right to use the land, adding, “They issued an eviction order but should have issued an order for land appropriation first.”

Authorities in Vietnam have long repressed the Catholic Church in the one-party communist state and subjected it to forced evictions, land grabs, and attacks on priests and their followers, sources say.

While all land in Vietnam is ultimately held by the state, land confiscations have become a flashpoint as residents accuse the government of pushing small landowners aside in favor of lucrative real estate projects, and of paying too little in compensation to those whose land is taken.