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Digital ISIS: Acting under ISIS orders via an online site, 16 year old stabs a policeman in Germany

A 16-year-old girl stabbed a policeman at a train station in Germany, acting under orders from Islamic State through an online messenger platform

ISIS group members with their flag. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
  • The rise of the digital age is exposing the youth to terrorism and turning them into radicals
  • Recently, a 16 year old girl from Germany stabbed a policeman after receiving orders from ISIS
  • She met members of the group during her trip to Istanbul in January 

A 16-year-old girl who stabbed a policeman at a train station in Hanover, Germany, was acting under orders from Islamic State, federal prosecutors said.Safia S., a German-Moroccan dual citizen who is in prison awaiting trial, was charged with attempted murder and with being a supporter of the jihadist group, the prosecutors said on Monday.

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She traveled to Istanbul in January, where she met members of the group who planned to help her enter IS-controlled territory in Syria. Her trip was aborted when her mother brought her back to Germany, where she stabbed and seriously wounded the policeman in February, the prosecution said in a statement.

The Hanover stabbing preceded attacks against civilians in Germany in late July, including two claimed by Islamic State in which only the assailants died.

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After being returned to Germany, Safia S. contacted IS members through an online messenger platform and asked them to help her plan an attack, prosecutors said.

They said a 19-year-old Syrian-German who knew about the plan and who is also in custody was charged with failing to report a crime.

The charges against both of the accused were pressed on Aug. 12, the prosecution said. No date for their trials has been set.

The summer attacks put the relatively liberal migration policies implemented by Chancellor Angela Merkel back in the spotlight and prompted her government to draft plans to increase spending on security. (VOA)

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Facebook, Twitter Urged to Do More to Police Hate on Sites

Twitter to soon release Snapchat like feature. VOA
Twitter starts the initiative #BloodMatters. VOA

Tech giants Facebook, Twitter and Google are taking steps to police terrorists and hate groups on their sites, but more work needs to be done, the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Tuesday.

The organization released its annual digital terrorism and hate report card and gave a B-plus to Facebook, a B-minus to Twitter and a C-plus to Google.

Facebook spokeswoman Christine Chen said the company had no comment on the report. Representatives for Google and Twitter did not immediately return emails seeking comment.

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Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay

Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the Wiesenthal Center’s associate dean, said Facebook in particular built “a recognition that bad folks might try to use their platform” as its business model. “There is plenty of material they haven’t dealt with to our satisfaction, but overall, especially in terms of hate, there’s zero tolerance,” Cooper said at a New York City news conference.

Rick Eaton, a senior researcher at the Wiesenthal Center, said hateful and violent posts on Instagram, which is part of Facebook, are quickly removed, but not before they can be widely shared.

He pointed to Instagram posts threatening terror attacks at the upcoming World Cup in Moscow. Another post promoted suicide attacks with the message, “You only die once. Why not make it martyrdom.”

Cooper said Twitter used to merit an F rating before it started cracking down on Islamic State tweets in 2016. He said the move came after testimony before a congressional committee revealed that “ISIS was delivering 200,000 tweets a day.”

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This photo shows Facebook launched on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. VOA

Cooper and Eaton said that as the big tech companies have gotten more aggressive in shutting down accounts that promote terrorism, racism and anti-Semitism, promoters of terrorism and hate have migrated to other sites such as, a Facebook lookalike that’s based in Russia.

There also are “alt-tech” sites like GoyFundMe, an alternative to GoFundMe, and BitChute, an alternative to Google-owned YouTube, Cooper said.

“If there’s an existing company that will give them a platform without looking too much at the content, they’ll use it,” he said. “But if not, they are attracted to those platforms that have basically no rules.”

The Los Angeles-based Wiesenthal Center is dedicated to fighting anti-Semitism, hate, and terrorism. (VOA)

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