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86 Fashion Companies Partner with Political Leaders to Deliver Climate Action

86 fashion companies pledge climate actions

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COP25 fashion companies
Fashion companies made a call to take climate action at the ongoing 25th Conference of Parties (COP25). Wikimedia Commons

Eighty-six fashion companies have asked political leaders around the world to partner with them to deliver effective and ambitious climate action, as part of an event celebrating one year of the Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action.

The call was made at the ongoing 25th Conference of Parties (COP25) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in this Spanish capital.

The summit, with delegates from 200 countries, including India, is expected to finalise rules governing the 2015 Paris Agreement that formally kicks the next year.

The communique from the fashion companies calls for a partnership with political leaders of countries with major fashion production and consumer markets, to create enabling policy environments that will bring the industry in line with the goal of limiting the global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

“The climate crisis is one of the most important issues to tackle. As a global fashion retailer, we have a big role to play and collaboration is key,” CEO H&M Group Karl-Johan Persson said.

H&M fashion
The fashion company group H&M’s CEO Karl-Johan Persson said that the climate crisis is the most important issue to tackle. Wikimedia Commons

“All actors need to take responsibility to drive the change towards cutting emissions and staying within planetary boundaries. Companies need to commit to this change and governments need to facilitate the process with the right laws, regulations and implementation thereof.”

The communique also identifies some concrete solutions related to renewable energy and calls for clear planning context for investment plans, availability of scaled-up grid-connected renewable energy sources, phasing-out of high-emitting fossil fuel-based sources of energy and incentives for the transition to renewables.

It is supported by all fashion charter companies and championed by CEOs of Aldo Group, Burberry, Esprit Group, H&M Group, Nike Inc., Puma SE, PVH Corp. and nine CEOs from brands, suppliers and retailers.

“The consequences of climate change are real for all of us. Nike is on our own journey toward a zero-carbon and zero waste future, but we know to accelerate the progress we need collective action across our industry,” said Mark Parker, Chairman, President and CEO, NIKE Inc.

At the event held at the UN Climate Change annual conference, some of the biggest brands in fashion took to the stage to reaffirm their commitment to achieving at least 30 per cent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions across the whole value chain by 2030 and to scale renewable energy and climate programmes in key textile production countries.

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Charter members recognize that current solutions and business models are not sufficient to deliver on the urgent need for climate action and have initiated an action-oriented roadmap to create mechanisms that will scale technical transformation within value chains, identify financial tools to fund that transformation and enhance collaboration with policymakers.

The Fashion Industry Charter brings together not only fashion brands, but manufacturers and retailers, logistics and investment companies and NGOs, and seeks to expand concrete engagement with all actors across the supply chain to transform to a sustainable industry. (IANS)

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Here’s Why Automative Technology May Have Adverse Impact on Climate, Public Health

climate trade-off is much different on the regional scale, especially in areas with high vehicle densities

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Technology
While automative technology is credited with boosting fuel efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions, GDI engines produce more black carbon aerosols than traditional port fuel injection engines. Pixabay

New automotive technology that promises enhanced fuel efficiency may have a serious downside, including significant climate and public health impacts, a new study suggests.

The gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine is one of the most prominent technologies car manufacturers adopted to achieve the fuel economy and carbon dioxide emission goals established in 2012 by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

While this technology is credited with boosting fuel efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions, GDI engines produce more black carbon aerosols than traditional port fuel injection engines, according to the study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

“Even though emissions from gasoline vehicles constitute a small fraction of the black carbon in the atmosphere, the vehicle emissions are concentrated in regions with high population densities, which magnifies their effect,” said study researcher Rawad Saleh, Assistant Professor at University of Georgia in the US.

The market share of GDI-equipped vehicles increased from 2.3 per cent in model year 2008 to 51 per cent in model year 2018. The EPA projects 93 per cent of vehicles in the US will be equipped with GDI engines by 2025. According to the study, researchers predicts the increase in black carbon emissions from GDI-powered vehicles will fuel climate warming in urban areas of the US that significantly exceeds the cooling associated with a reduction in CO2.

In addition, they believe the shift will nearly double the premature mortality rate associated with vehicle emissions, from 855 deaths annually to 1,599. The researchers estimate the annual social cost of these premature deaths at $5.95 billion. The increase of black carbon is an unintended consequence of the shift to GDI-equipped vehicles that some scientists suspected was based on experimental data, according to the researcher.

Technology
New automotive technology that promises enhanced fuel efficiency may have a serious downside, including significant climate and public health impacts. Pixabay

“This study is the first to place these experimental findings in a complex modeling framework to investigate the trade-off between CO2 reduction and an increase in black carbon,” Slah said. While previous research has reported the shift to GDI engines will result in net benefits for the global climate, the researchers said that these benefits are rather small and can only be realized on timescales of decades.

Meanwhile, the negative impact of black carbon can be felt instantaneously, they added.

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“Our research shows the climate trade-off is much different on the regional scale, especially in areas with high vehicle densities. In these regions, the climate burden induced by the increase in black carbon dominates over the climate benefits of the reduction in CO2,” said Saleh. (IANS)