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96% of Deepfake Videos Contain Pornographic Material

"Deepfakes" are video forgeries that make people appear to be saying things they never did, like the popular forged videos

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Deepfake, Videos, Pornographic
The rise of synthetic media and deepfakes is forcing us towards an important and unsettling realization: our historical belief that video and audio are reliable records of reality is no longer tenable. Pixabay

As tech firms scramle to tackle the spread of deepfake videos online, a new research has claimed 96 per cent of such videos contain pornographic material targeting female celebrities.

The researchers from Deeptrace, a Netherland-based cybersecurity company, also found that top four websites dedicated to deepfake pornography received more than 134 million views on videos.

“This significant viewership demonstrates a market for websites creating and hosting deepfake pornography, a trend that will continue to grow unless decisive action is taken,” said Giorgio Patrini, Founder, CEO and Chief Scientist at Deeptrace.

“The rise of synthetic media and deepfakes is forcing us towards an important and unsettling realization: our historical belief that video and audio are reliable records of reality is no longer tenable,” he added.

Deepfake, Videos, Pornographic
The researchers from Deeptrace, a Netherland-based cybersecurity company, also found that top four websites dedicated to deepfake pornography received more than 134 million views on videos. Pixabay

“Deepfakes” are video forgeries that make people appear to be saying things they never did, like the popular forged videos of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that went viral recently.

Facebook has partnered with Microsoft, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and other institutions to fight ‘deepfakes’ and has committed $10 million towards creating open source tools that can better detect if a video has been doctored.

“Deepfake” techniques, which present realistic AI-generated videos of real people doing and saying fictional things, have significant implications for determining the legitimacy of information presented online.

Since its foundation in 2018, Deeptrace has been dedicated to researching deepfakes’ evolving capabilities and threats, providing crucial intelligence for enhancing its detection technology.

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The research revealed that the deepfake phenomenon is growing rapidly online, with the number of deepfake videos almost doubling over the last seven months to 14,678.

This increase is supported by the growing commodification of tools and services that lower the barrier for non-experts to create deepfakes.

“Perhaps unsurprisingly, we observed a significant contribution to the creation and use of synthetic media tools from web users in China and South Korea, despite the totality of our sources coming from the English-speaking Internet,” Patrini said in a statement.

Deepfakes are also making a significant impact on the political sphere.

Deepfake, Videos, Pornographic
This significant viewership demonstrates a market for websites creating and hosting deepfake pornography, a trend that will continue to grow unless decisive action is taken. Pixabay

“Outside of politics, the weaponization of deepfakes and synthetic media is influencing the cybersecurity landscape, enhancing traditional cyber threats and enabling entirely new attack vectors,” said the company.

To fight the growing menace, Facebook, the Partnership on AI, Microsoft, and academics from Cornell Tech, MIT, University of Oxford, University of California-Berkeley, University of Maryland, College Park, and University at Albany-SUNY are coming together to build the Deepfake Detection Challenge (DFDC).

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According to Professor Rama Chellappa from University of Maryland, “given the recent developments in being able to generate manipulated information (text, images, videos, and audio) at scale, we need the full involvement of the research community in an open environment to develop methods and systems that can detect and mitigate the ill effects of manipulated multimedia”. (IANS)

Next Story

Facebook to Tackle the Problem of Manipulated Media on its Platform

Facebook cracks down on deepfake videos

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Facebook has announced tough policies against the spread of manipulated media on its platform. Pixabay

Alarmed at the growing forged or deepfake videos on its platform, Facebook has announced tough policies against the spread of manipulated media on its platform.

The company said that going forward, it will remove misleading manipulated media if it has been edited or synthesized beyond adjustments for clarity or quality “in ways that aren’t apparent to an average person and would likely mislead someone into thinking that a subject of the video said words that they did not actually say”.

“If it is the product of artificial intelligence or machine learning that merges, replaces or superimposes content onto a video, making it appear to be authentic.
This policy does not extend to content that is parody or satire, or video that has been edited solely to omit or change the order of words,” Monika Bickert, Vice President, Global Policy Management, said in a statement on Monday.

“Deepfakes” are video forgeries that make people appear to be saying things they never did, like the popular forged videos of Zuckerberg and that of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that went viral last year.

Facebook said it is driving conversations with more than 50 global experts with technical, policy, media, legal, civic and academic backgrounds to inform its policy development and improve the science of detecting manipulated media.

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Facebook said it is driving conversations with more than 50 global experts with technical, policy, media, legal, civic and academic backgrounds to inform its policy development. Pixabay

“Consistent with our existing policies, audio, photos or videos, whether a deepfake or not, will be removed from Facebook if they violate any of our other Community Standards including those governing nudity, graphic violence, voter suppression and hate speech,” said Bickert.

Videos that don’t meet these standards for removal are still eligible for review by one of Facebook’s independent third-party fact-checkers, which include over 50 partners worldwide fact-checking in over 40 languages.

“If a photo or video is rated false or partly false by a fact-checker, we significantly reduce its distribution in News Feed and reject it if it’s being run as an ad. And critically, people who see it, try to share it, or have already shared it, will see warnings alerting them that it’s false,” said Facebook.

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The social media platform said it has partnered with Reuters to help newsrooms worldwide to identify deepfakes and manipulated media through a free online training course.

“News organizations increasingly rely on third parties for large volumes of images and video, and identifying manipulated visuals is a significant challenge. This programme aims to support newsrooms trying to do this work,” said Facebook. (IANS)