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A Start Up Company From Japan To Launch ‘Love Satellites’

If this service receives a good response, Warspace would expand its business and will send out more commemorative objects into space.

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A Japanese start-up linked to the University of Tsukuba is set to launch small satellites with commemorative titanium plaques carrying love messages into space by the end of 2019, the company said on Monday.

Those interested would be able to engrave messages of their choice on the plaques, which would be 1.8 centimeters long and 0.8 centimeter wide, set to be carried to space aboard the satellites and orbit around the Earth for around two years before being destroyed, Efe reported.

Around 10 centimeters in size, the CubeSat satellites would be able to carry up to 600 pure titanium plaques and would be transported to the International Space Station (ISS) by a rocket of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

Japan Love satellite
Around 10 centimeters in size, the CubeSat satellites would be able to carry up to 600 pure titanium plaques

In the ISS, the astronauts stationed there will take photographs of the ultra-small satellite which would be then sent to the couples to prove that their messages have reached space, Warspace CEO Toshihiro Kameda said.

The start-up had planned to offer this service exclusively to the couples getting married at a hotel in Tsukuba, in Ibaraki prefecture, for the price of $270, but in the face of growing demand it decided to expand its offer and set up an online order facility in September.

Although they have not determined the number of people interested in the service yet, couples from Japan, the US and Taiwan have contacted the company.

Japan Love satellite
University of Tsukuba, Japan. Flickr

Also Read: ISRO’s First Manned Space Mission to Cost $1.4 Billion

The mini satellites and the plaques would be destroyed after two years by burning up when they come in contact with Earth’s atmosphere, said Kameda, a professor who teaches the mechanics of materials at the University of Tsukuba.

If this service receives a good response, Warspace would expand its business and will send out more commemorative objects into space which would later return to Earth, the head of the project said. (IANS)

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Human Sperm Retains Viability in Outer Space Conditions: Researchers

The study was presented at an annual meeting of European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Vienna, Austria

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Each sperm has 37.5MB of DNA information in it.
Each sperm has 37.5MB of DNA information in it.

Researchers have found that human sperm retains its complete viability within the different gravitational conditions found in outer space.

The results could be a huge boost to zillionaires like Amazon founder Jeff Bezos who see the “colonisation” of space as an answer to the Earth’s ever threatened resources.

“If the number of space missions increases in the coming years, and are of longer duration, it is important to study the effects of long-term human exposure to space in order to face them,” said Montserrat Boada from Dexeus Women’s Health in Barcelona, whose group worked with microgravity engineers from the Polytechnic University of Barcelona.

“It’s not unreasonable to start thinking about the possibility of reproduction beyond the Earth,” Boada said.

The study was performed using a small aerobatic training aircraft (CAP10), which can provide short-duration hypogravity exposure.

The plane executed a series of 20 parabolic manoeuvres, providing eight seconds of microgravity for each parabola.

Overall, 10 sperm samples obtained from 10 healthy donors were analysed after exposure to the different microgravities found in space and ground gravity.

To overcome regulatory constraints and increase donor numbers, sperm banks in the UK and Australia began to market the act of donating sperm as a confirmation of masculinity. Pixabay

The sperm analysis comprised a full range of measurements currently performed for fertility testing — concentration, motility, vitality, morphology and DNA fragmentation — and results found no difference whatsoever in any of the parameters between the microgravity space samples and the control group samples from Earth.

Indeed, there was 100 per cent concordance in DNA fragmentation rate and vitality, and 90 per cent concordance in sperm concentration and motility, said Boada.

These minor differences, she added, “were more probably related to heterogeneity of the sperm sample than to the effect of exposure to different gravity conditions”.

Boada described this as a preliminary study and her group will now move on to validate the results and then to larger sperm samples, longer periods of microgravity and even fresh sperm.

Also Read: Xiaomi Confirms First Smartphones Under its New CC Series

One reason for using frozen sperm in this study was the known effect of radiation on fresh sperm, Boada noted.

“Radiation impairs the quality and viability of human sperm, and these effects are expected to be greater on fresh sperm than on frozen samples,” she said.

The study was presented at an annual meeting of European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Vienna, Austria. (IANS)