Tuesday October 22, 2019
Home India Cotton sari w...

Cotton sari water filter: An indigenous water purifier for rural India that costs only Rs 1500

0
//

By Shilpika Srivastava

Talking about facts, there are 13% of inhabitants in Delhi who do not get water supply every day. If India’s national capital is dealing with such water crisis, think how acute the problem is in the rural areas.

Millions of people are still compelled to drink contaminated water leading to a series of health issues.  In rural India, thousands of infants die each year only due to diarrheal diseases, which are both preventable and treatable. According to World Health Organization (WHO), diarrheal diseases are the second leading cause of death in children under five years old.

The problem is so critical that even if we achieve the Millennium Development Goal of halving the population who do not have access to drinking water and sanitation by 2015, there will still be 244 million people in rural India and 90 million in urban India with no access to safe and sustainable water supply.

Keeping in mind the high cost of water purifiers available in the market and unavailability of electricity in rural areas, Nimbkar Agricultural Research Institute (NARI), an NGO working in rural Maharashtra, has developed a unique and low cost solar water purifier (SWP) for rural households. The best part is that it does not even require electricity or wastes precious water unlike the Reverse Osmosis (RO) systems.

water1
“It took us about three years to develop SWP and total cost was Rs 20 lakhs. However, the major cost was spent on the staff,” told Anil K Rajvanshi, Director and Hon. Secretary, NARI, to NewsGram.

“We live in rural area and we have observed that because of poor drinking water there are a lot of diarrhea related health issues. More so with children and so we thought of providing a solution to it and hence the solar water purifier,” added Rajvanshi.

The low cost water purifier consists of four tubular solar water heaters attached to a stainless steel manifold. Unclean water is then filled in SWP after being filtered with a four-layered cotton cloth and then it is heated up in the stagnation mode by solar energy to make the water potable.

How it works?

SWP was developed in two steps essentially. The first step required a four-layered cotton sari cloth to filter unclean water. NARI explained that the tests done in its labs showed that such filtered water heated either to 60C for 15 minutes or 45C for 3 hours suspends all the coliform bacteria.

water 2


Therefore, in the second step, the filtered water was then heated using the tubular solar collectors in the SWP in order to achieve a temperature of 60C for 15 minutes to kill the existing coliforms.

SWP has been tested extensively by NARI and it was found that even on a completely cloudy and rainy day, water is heated to high enough temperature to make water clean and drinkable.

water3
How much it cost?

The main goal of NARI was to create a water purifier that could be easily afforded by the rural inhabitants.

SWP costs about Rs. 1,500 ($25), and is so simple that any small rural workshop can manufacture it.

The fact that should be highly appreciated is that NARI has not patented this technology since it believes that the purifier should be made freely available for rural population.

“I have always believed that availability of clean drinking water to every citizen is a birth right and every government of the day should provide it. You may be able to live without food for 5-10 days but cannot live without water for more than 5 hours. Clean drinking water is extremely important for health. The difference between poverty and affluence is the availability of clean drinking water,” said Rajvanshi.

Next Story

Asia Poised to Become a Dominant Market for Wind Energy: IRENA Report

According to the "Future of Wind" published at China Wind Power in Beijing, global wind power could rise ten-fold reaching over 6,000 GW by 2050

0
Wind Energy
Low-cost renewable energy technologies like Wind Energy are readily-available today, representing the most effective and immediate solution for reducing carbon emissions. Pixabay

Asia could grow its share of installed capacity for onshore wind energy from 230 Gigawatt (GW) in 2018 to over 2,600 GW by 2050, a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) said on Monday.

By that time, the region would become a global leader in wind, accounting for more than 50 per cent of all onshore and over 60 per cent of all offshore wind capacity installed globally.

China would take the lead with 2,525 GW of installed onshore and offshore wind capacity by 2050 within Asia, followed by India (443 GW), Korea (78 GW) and South-East Asia (16 GW).

According to the “Future of Wind” published at China Wind Power in Beijing, global wind power could rise ten-fold reaching over 6,000 GW by 2050.

By mid-century, wind could cover one-third of global power needs and — combined with electrification — deliver a quarter of the energy-related carbon emission reductions needed to meet the Paris climate targets.

To reach this objective, onshore and offshore wind capacity will need to increase four-fold and ten-fold respectively every year compared to today.

“With renewables, it’s possible to achieve a climate-safe future,” said IRENA’s Director-General Francesco La Camera.

“Low-cost renewable energy technologies like wind power are readily-available today, representing the most effective and immediate solution for reducing carbon emissions.

Wind Energy
With renewable Wind Energy, its possible to achieve a climate-safe future. Pixabay

“Our roadmap for a global energy transformation to 2050 shows that it is technically and economically feasible to ensure a climate-safe, sustainable energy future. Unlocking global wind energy potential will be particularly important. In fact, wind energy could be the largest single source of power generation by mid-century under this path. This would not only enable us to meet climate goals, but it would also boost economic growth and create jobs, thereby accelerating sustainable development,” added Camera.

The global wind industry could become a veritable job motor, employing over 3.7 million people by 2030 and more than six million people by 2050, IRENA’s report finds.

These figures are respectively nearly three times higher and five times higher than the slightly over one million jobs in 2018.

Sound industrial and labour policies that build upon and strengthen domestic supply chains can enable income and employment growth by leveraging existing economic activities in support of wind industry development.

But to accelerate the growth of global wind power over the coming decades, scaling up investments will be key.

On average, global annual investment in onshore wind must increase from today $67 billion to $211 billion in 2050.

Wind Energy
To accelerate the growth of global Wind Energy over the coming decades, scaling up investments will be key. Pixabay

For offshore wind, global average annual investments would need to increase from $19 billion to $100 billion in 2050.

Asia would account for more than 50 per cent of global onshore wind power installations by 2050, followed by North America (23 per cent) and Europe (10 per cent).

ALSO READ: Fatty Tissues Accumulate Inside Lungs of Obese People: Study

For offshore, Asia would cover more than 60 per cent of global installations, followed by Europe (22 per cent) and North America (16 per cent). (IANS)