Wednesday March 20, 2019

A healthy and thrilling bookshelf for the weekend

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This weekend take a break from your busy life and pay attention to your health with an Ayurvedic diet or add some thrill and adventure in your regular routine.

The bookshelf for this weekend provides you the secret of healthy and happy life.

Also, a crime thriller that reveals the plot with the flip of every page; a girl’s plight in adjusting in a new rich city while chasing her dreams; and a young man’s tryst with fate and the unbeatable combination of destiny and desire.

1. Book: Author: Reenita Malhotra Hora; Publisher: Harper; Pages: 195; 

Do you feel lazy, sleep deprived and tired? Have you started too much of unhealthy foods? Does your food habit often leaves you reaching for the medicine box?

Reenita Malhotra Hora’s book is a solution that offers a helping hand out of the negative cycle in three simple steps that teach the basics of Ayurvedic nutrition. This is one stop, easy-to-use, a jagron-free guide to nutritional wellness and a healthier life.

2. Book: Author: Vish Dhamija; Publisher: Rumour Books; Pages: 357; 

A jeweller from Mumbai is found dead in Belgium. The concealed camera could only photograph one of those involved in the murder. The case comes to India when it is found that a diamond purchased by the jeweller is sold in Mumbai.

Vish Dhamija’s latest book marks the return of DCP Rita Ferreira who is assigned the case. But when Ferreira and her team tracks down the man, they discover that a private detective is already following their target.

A biting must read!

3. Book:  Author: Anjum Hasan; Publisher: Roli Books; Pages: 287; 

Sophie Das, a 25-year-old protagonist from Shillong, shifts to Bangalore in search of work, fun and liberty. Unfortunately, a horrific murder sends her back to Shillong, where her Hamlet-quoting father and religious mother are chasing their dreams.

Will Sophie be able to pull back from the brink and find herself a home? The book brings the vivid life of a young woman in a big city, accompanied by the wit, warmth and uncertainty of the everyday world.

4. Book:  Author: Saurabh Leekha; Publisher: NotionPress; Pages: 165; Price: Rs.179

Following a broken love affair, disappointed with family and facing challenges in the workplace, protagonist Aditya transforms himself from a subdued individual into a rebellious survivor.

Will he be able to deliver his best? Will he be able to beat the same people who think he is a toddler? Will he realise his dream of acquiring a personal jetliner, a metaphor and a benchmark for the pursuit of success? (IANS)(Image Courtesy: whytoread.com)

Next Story

Smartphones Take Away Books From People Of Taiwan

Excluding those who read comic books, magazines or digital books, about 40.8 per cent of those surveyed said they read no print book in 2018, according to the survey on people's reading behaviour by the United Daily News's Vision Project.

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10.7 per cent said they had no such book-reading habit, further analysis by the survey found. Pixabay

More than one-fifth of people in Taiwan did not read a single book last year as smartphones, tablets and computers take up most people’s time, according to a survey.

Excluding those who read comic books, magazines or digital books, about 40.8 per cent of those surveyed said they read no print book in 2018, according to the survey on people’s reading behaviour by the United Daily News’s Vision Project.

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About 20.6 per cent of respondents who read no books last year said they simply didn’t like reading and 10.7 per cent said they had no such book-reading habit, further analysis by the survey found. Pixabay

According to the research, 1,556 respondents were surveyed from December 28, 2018 to January 3, 2019, Xinhua news agency reported.

Of those respondents who read no print books last year, about one-third of them said the last time they read a print book was one to three years ago. Another 20 per cent said their last book reading occurred more than 10 years ago.

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40 per cent said they had no time for reading or that reading took up too much time, it said. Pixabay

About 20.6 per cent of respondents who read no books last year said they simply didn’t like reading and 10.7 per cent said they had no such book-reading habit, further analysis by the survey found.

And 40 per cent said they had no time for reading or that reading took up too much time, it said.

Also Read: Can Social Media Control “Objectionable Content” And “Political Bias” From Its Platform?

Among those who read print books, about one third spent one to three hours a week reading and 14 per cent spent three to five hours a week reading, 12 per cent spent more than nine hours a week reading, according to the survey. (IANS)