Friday December 15, 2017

A lecture on Global Indian medical diaspora by University of York on March 3

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Dr. Munish Kumar Raizada

Indian medical doctors have now become an international species, so to say. Even though, there is a shortage of doctors in India, yet the Indian doctor has ventured out (like Gandhi) and has touched the shores of literally all continents. USA, England are obviously the hot destinations for doctors, Canada, Australia not falling behind. In USA, 20 % of all international medical graduates consist of (East) Indian doctors. Indian doctors literally constitute a ‘model minority’ in USA!- characterized by advanced education and high earning.

Middle East’s health industry is literally shouldered by doctors, nurses and paramedics of Indian origin. However, Africa is another continent where you will come across Indian doctors and medical teachers. In last 2 decades, several medical schools have come up in Caribbean islands.

Medical teachers from India make up a chunk of the workforce there too. I have come across Indian doctors in as unlikely places as Seychelles! This brain drain of Indian doctors is obviously a boon for the countries which welcome them with open arms.

Thus, I was not surprised when I came across this upcoming lecture.

The University of York, situated about 3 hours drive from London will host a lecture on the topic of the spread of doctors of Indian descent venturing out to various parts  of world in last half a century. The speaker will be  Professor David Wright, McGill University, Canada. Professor Wright will speak on the topic:

“Not everyone can be a Gandhi”: The global Indian medical diaspora in the post-world war II era.

The university’s notification says: “From Manchester to Melbourne, from Auckland to Aberystwyth, from Detroit to Dartmouth,  doctors from the Indian Subcontinent dispersed throughout the Western World in the 1950s, 60s and 70s.

To date, the demographic phenomenon of Indian- and other foreign-trained doctors has largely resided on the fringes of ‘national’ histories of twentieth-century health services.  Adopting a global health history perspective, this lecture examines the post-war Indian medical diaspora, exploring the contemporary impact and historical legacy of this remarkable circulation of health care practitioners.”

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Patient Suspected to Kill Indian Doctor in the US

A second case of the killing of an Indian doctor in Kansas has shocked the masses

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In addition to providing psychiatric care, Dr Achutha Reddy also treated chronic physical pain and expounded a system he called "Absolute Yoga". (IANS)

Kansas, September 15, 2017 : An Indian doctor was stabbed to death in Kansas state of the US. One of his patients has been arrested as a suspect in the stabbing death, according to police.

Achutha Reddy’s death in Witchita on Wednesday is the second killing this year of an Indian in Kansas where Srinivas Kuchibhotla was shot dead in February. Both hailed form Telengana.

The 21-year-old man, who was arrested as a suspect in Reddy’s killing, was identified as Umar Rashid Dutt in jail booking records, according to TV station KAKE.

The attack on Reddy, 57, began in his clinic and ended in a nearby lane as the fleeing doctor was chased down by the assailant, the police said.

Reddy, who introduced yoga in his treatment, was mourned by fellow doctors and the community, who held him in esteem.

Police Lieutenant Todd Ojile said on Thursday in a media briefing video posted on the Wichita Police website that the office manager of Reddy’s Holistic Psychiatric Services heard a disturbance in the doctor’s office on Wednesday evening around 7 p.m. and saw the assault taking place when he went in.

The manager tried to stop the attack allowing Reddy to flee, but he was chased by the assailant and killed in a second assault in an alley behind the clinic, Ojile said.

He said that Reddy had several stab wounds and was pronounced dead by the emergency medical team that responded.

The suspect was arrested near a country club a short time later, when a security guard alerted police to a man covered with blood in a car, Ojile said.

He was still in custody on Thursday morning and Ojile said the case was likely to be given to the district prosecutor’s office on Friday afternoon.

Pending the filing of formal charges, police did not give out the arrested man’s name, which was found by the media in jail records.

According to TV station KAKE, a Wichita State University spokesman said Dutt was a former student and was last enrolled in the spring of 2015.

The Wichita Eagle newspaper said that Reddy, who graduated from Hyderabad’s Osmania Medical College in 1986, did an internship at St. Louis University in 1994 and a residency at the Kansas University School of Medicine-Wichita in 1998.

He practiced in Wichita for more than two decades and opened his own practice in 2003, the newspaper said.

In YouTube videos Reddy said that in addition to providing psychiatric care he also treated chronic physical pain and expounded a system he called “Absolute Yoga”.

He said that he had suffered chronic back pain for 10 years and that led led him to conduct research and develop the system which emphasised having the “right mindset”.

Fellow doctors and members of the community said his death was a loss to society.

The Wichita Eagle newspaper quoted Denis Knight, president of the Medical Society of Sedgwick County, as saying: “The Medical Society is heartbroken over the loss of Reddy.”

Achutha Reddy’s wife, Beena Reddy, is also a doctor and Denis said: “Our thoughts and prayers go out to her. Reddy’s death is a tragic loss to our community.”

The newspaper quoted Brenda Trammel, a psychotherapist at his clinic, as saying: “Reddy was an amazing, compassionate man who was kind and loving to anyone he met. He had a gift of knowing what each and everyone of us needed and gave it freely.”

April Marie Schlenker from Kansas State University said in a post on TV station KAKE’s site: “Reddy was so unique to any one else I have ever met in the therapy/psychiatric world. He connected almost instantly with people. His eyes held wisdom and secrets and joy.”

A former patient, Maria William, wrote, “He was always a good and caring doctor for his patients. Reddy you will be greatly missed by many people. Fly high with the angels.”

While some posters demanded hanging the killer or taking strong measures, a medical professional, Pedro Murati, said: “In these sad times we must remember what Achutha would have wanted after such a horror.”

Projecting “anger towards the mentally ill would be the last thing on his mind”, he added.

In February, Kuchibotla’s killing in Olathe by a white man shouting: “Get out of my country”, has been denounced as a white racist hate crime, but Reddy’s does not fit that description.

Kuchibotla’s killer, Adam Purinton, 51, has been charged with first-degree murder and with attempted murder in shooting and injuring Alok Madasan (IANS)

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World Environment Day on June 5: Here is what you can do to honor this ‘Global Festival’

Did you know 5th June is the World Environment Day? Read more to find out about this day.

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Group of people planting trees. VOA
  • Every year on the 5th June the world celebrates environment day 
  • People spread awareness on how to improve the environment and its importance

June 04, 2017: June 05 will be observed as World Environment day with the basic idea is to stress the importance of conserving the environment, a thought that we sometimes tend to forget. Its origins can be traced back to environmentalists who voiced that the effort to protect the environment is collective and global in nature.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The world environment day is an initiative of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), which demands environmental protection action worldwide. The day is celebrated not just for awareness but also for the celebration of the years of hard work and efforts.

The first World Environment Day was celebrated in 1973. Since then, it has been celebrated in the different parts of the world every year with different themes. Today, over 100 countries celebrate the festival.

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Canada will be hosting the 2017 World Environment Day. [bctt tweet=”The theme set for this year is ‘Connecting People to Nature'” username=” NewsGramdotcom”]The theme demands from us stepping out and interacting with the open environment around us. It is to cherish the relationship between man and environment.

This year’s theme ‘getting in touch with nature’. VOA

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Let us look at 10 of the SIMPLEST ways you can contribute to this global effort:

  • We consume over 80 trillion aluminium cans every year. Recycling just one can save you enough energy to run the television for three hours. Next time you’re drinking a can of coke, make sure you put in the recycle bin.
  • Save Water! Out of the world’s total water supply, just 1% is usable. Rest 97% are oceans and frozen water.
  • Plastic bags and other plastic garbage are thrown into the ocean, which kills more than 1,000,000 sea creatures every year. Ban plastic bags completely.

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  • Drop the idea of using your car and cycle the short distances. It makes more difference than you think.
  • Reduce your carbon footprint. Turn off unnecessary lights and switches.
  • The famous old suggestion – ‘Plant a Tree’. If that is too much, just water some plants in the park near you. Add to the growth of life.
  • Promote renewable sources of energy.

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  • Do not waste food. World Environment Day is closely associated with Sustainable Development. Resources must be optimally used.
  • Make sure that you voice your interest publicly in protecting the environment. It could influence others including the local politicians to act.
  • Wear Green and go for a walk outside.

[bctt tweet=”The environment is an asset we must strive to protect it. ” username=”NewsGramdotcom”]- By Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

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First Indian doctor in last 5 years and Ex AIIMS head M C Misra Awarded honorary fellowship of prestigious Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

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Former AIIMS Director and internationally renowned surgeon M.C. Misra. VOA

New Delhi, May 24, 2017: Former AIIMS Director and internationally renowned surgeon M.C. Misra has been awarded the honorary fellowship of prestigious Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, a first for an Indian doctor in the last five years.

The announcement was made on Tuesday evening.

“It is with great pleasure, we write on behalf of Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh to invite you to accept the award of fellowship ad hominem (Honorary fellowship),” reads the letter for Misra to convey the honor by the premier organization.

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The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh is an organization dedicated to the pursuit of excellence and advancement in surgical practice, through its interest in education, training, and examinations, its liaison with external medical bodies and representation of the modern surgical workforce.

The Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh is one of the oldest surgical corporations in the world and traces its origins to 1505 when the Barber Surgeons of Edinburgh were formally incorporated as a craft guild of Edinburgh.

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Today, the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh is an international network with a membership of almost 20,000, in almost 100 countries.

Misra, also a globally renowned trauma expert, retired on January 31, 2017 after serving All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) as its director for more than three years. (IANS)