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“Baris”: A Mediterranean Restaurant for Diverse Audiences, Moods, and Occasions

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Mediterranean Food, (representational Image) Wikimedia
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New Delhi, May 12, 2017: Not many restaurants are successful in catering to diverse set of audiences, moods, and occasions — an ideal family dinner, a meeting adda for friends, solo dining or a quiet place to flick through a recent book while sipping your coffee. On the contrary, this new kid on the block seems to tick all the right boxes.

As the name suggests, Baris — a peaceful Mediterranean cuisine restaurant in the heart of thr national capital — seems to brilliantly combine tailored efforts to cater to diverse sets of audiences.

The classy two floor place can be relished in both the fine dining section and the laid back lounge where sky is the limit for the traditional hookah.

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The restaurant section has a colour coordinated interior with arabesque windows, which is not only some sort of a soothing balm on the eyes but it can also comfortably engage at least 50 people. The terrace – with lovely decor all over – makes it a beautiful place and offers seating for another 50.

Baris is everything you can hope for, from traditional and authentic Mediterranean flavour dishes and desserts to die for to admirable presentation, service, atmosphere and Turkish aesthetics.

The menu has been created with the help of Turkish chef Sahin Ibis who takes you on a journey through Turkish streets.

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Starting from Cigar Borek — crispy cigar rolls with feta cheese — to Adana and Urfa Kebab, every savoury was a delight prepared with authentic Middle Eastern flavours.

While the Adana Kebabs — named after a major city in southern Turkey — will miraculously melt in the mouth, the Urfa Kebabs will take you to to the land of the crescent moon. These delicacies were as juicy as it can get and were perfectly grilled.

The well presented lamb shanks, rice pudding, the kababs and pumpkin Catalana were among the chef’s signature dishes.

“I have blended Middle-Eastern and Asian spices according to Indian palates which gives an appropriate taste suiting Indian taste buds,” the chef told IANS.

“We have also experimented with dIfferent kind of herbs such as thyme and rosemary to produce improvised taste,” he added.

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Not only did the place have a lot to offer in non-vegetarian section but there was also a large share of vegetables, and surprisingly the vegetarian food was equally impressive.

Peynir kebab and Mantar Yahnisi are delights to try. The chef emphasised the fact that he prepared the dishes accoding to Indian palates. “We use much less spices in Turkey. If I serve you what we eat in Turkish homes, you’ll find it horrendously bland.”

Mocktails on offer are different too and go well with Turkish Pide (Pizza). My pizza selection was Demeluzzz pide, which was simply mouth watering. In moctails, I tried Moraccan Mystery, a muddled drink with Pomegranate and Coriander.

The place is full of vibrant vibes to get you high, even though a liquor licence is exexpected.

FAQs:

Location: Building 3, Local Shopping Complex, Mazjid Moth, GK 2, New Delhi

Meal for two: Rs 2,000 (without liquor).

Must Haves: Tavuklu Pide, Cigar Borek, Urfa Kebab, Woodo Paynir, Baklava Duo, Pumpkin Catalana. (IANS)

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Farmers To Grow Modified Cotton With Its Seed Edible

Many of the world’s roughly 80 cotton-producing countries, especially in Asia and Africa, have populations that face malnutrition that could be addressed with the new plant

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An experimental cotton plant is shown at a Texas A&M research facility in this handout image provided by the Texas A&M University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in College Station, Texas, U.S. VOA

U.S. regulators have cleared the way for farmers to grow a cotton plant genetically modified to make the cottonseed edible for people, a protein-packed potential new food source that could be especially useful in cotton-growing countries beset with malnutrition.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service on Tuesday lifted the regulatory prohibition on cultivation by farmers of the cotton plant, which was developed by Texas A&M University scientists. The plant’s cottonseed cannot be used as food for people or as animal feed yet in the United States because it lacks Food and Drug Administration approval.

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Cotton plant. pixabay

Cotton is widely grown around the world, with its fiber used to make textiles and the cottonseed used among other things to feed animals such as cattle and sheep that have multiple stomach chambers. Ordinary cottonseed is unfit for humans and many animals to eat because it contains high levels of gossypol, a toxic chemical.

With financial help from a cotton industry group, scientists led by Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant biotechnologist Keerti Rathore used so-called RNAi, or RNA interference, technology to “silence” a gene, virtually eliminating gossypol from the cottonseed. They left gossypol at natural levels in the rest of the plant because it guards against insects and disease.

“To me, personally, it tastes somewhat like chickpea and it could easily be used to make a tasty hummus,” Rathore said of gossypol-free cottonseed.

After cottonseed oil, which can be used for cooking, is extracted, the remaining high-protein meal from the new cotton plant can find many uses, Rathore said.

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If all of the cottonseed currently produced worldwide were used for human nutrition, it could meet the daily protein requirements of about 575 million people. Pixabay

It can be turned into flour for use in breads, tortillas and other baked goods and used in protein bars, while whole cottonseed kernels, roasted and salted, can be consumed as a snack or to create a peanut butter type of paste, Rathore added.

If all of the cottonseed currently produced worldwide were used for human nutrition, it could meet the daily protein requirements of about 575 million people, Rathore said.

Other countries would have to give regulatory approval for the new cotton plant to be grown, though U.S. regulatory action often is taken into consideration.

Also Read: Food Cooked on The Barbecue Can Impair Your Lungs

The new cottonseed’s biggest commercial use may be as feed for poultry, swine and farmed aquatic species like fish and shrimp, Rathore said.

Many of the world’s roughly 80 cotton-producing countries, especially in Asia and Africa, have populations that face malnutrition that could be addressed with the new plant, Rathore added. (VOA)