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“Baris”: A Mediterranean Restaurant for Diverse Audiences, Moods, and Occasions

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Mediterranean Food, (representational Image) Wikimedia

New Delhi, May 12, 2017: Not many restaurants are successful in catering to diverse set of audiences, moods, and occasions — an ideal family dinner, a meeting adda for friends, solo dining or a quiet place to flick through a recent book while sipping your coffee. On the contrary, this new kid on the block seems to tick all the right boxes.

As the name suggests, Baris — a peaceful Mediterranean cuisine restaurant in the heart of thr national capital — seems to brilliantly combine tailored efforts to cater to diverse sets of audiences.

The classy two floor place can be relished in both the fine dining section and the laid back lounge where sky is the limit for the traditional hookah.

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The restaurant section has a colour coordinated interior with arabesque windows, which is not only some sort of a soothing balm on the eyes but it can also comfortably engage at least 50 people. The terrace – with lovely decor all over – makes it a beautiful place and offers seating for another 50.

Baris is everything you can hope for, from traditional and authentic Mediterranean flavour dishes and desserts to die for to admirable presentation, service, atmosphere and Turkish aesthetics.

The menu has been created with the help of Turkish chef Sahin Ibis who takes you on a journey through Turkish streets.

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Starting from Cigar Borek — crispy cigar rolls with feta cheese — to Adana and Urfa Kebab, every savoury was a delight prepared with authentic Middle Eastern flavours.

While the Adana Kebabs — named after a major city in southern Turkey — will miraculously melt in the mouth, the Urfa Kebabs will take you to to the land of the crescent moon. These delicacies were as juicy as it can get and were perfectly grilled.

The well presented lamb shanks, rice pudding, the kababs and pumpkin Catalana were among the chef’s signature dishes.

“I have blended Middle-Eastern and Asian spices according to Indian palates which gives an appropriate taste suiting Indian taste buds,” the chef told IANS.

“We have also experimented with dIfferent kind of herbs such as thyme and rosemary to produce improvised taste,” he added.

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Not only did the place have a lot to offer in non-vegetarian section but there was also a large share of vegetables, and surprisingly the vegetarian food was equally impressive.

Peynir kebab and Mantar Yahnisi are delights to try. The chef emphasised the fact that he prepared the dishes accoding to Indian palates. “We use much less spices in Turkey. If I serve you what we eat in Turkish homes, you’ll find it horrendously bland.”

Mocktails on offer are different too and go well with Turkish Pide (Pizza). My pizza selection was Demeluzzz pide, which was simply mouth watering. In moctails, I tried Moraccan Mystery, a muddled drink with Pomegranate and Coriander.

The place is full of vibrant vibes to get you high, even though a liquor licence is exexpected.

FAQs:

Location: Building 3, Local Shopping Complex, Mazjid Moth, GK 2, New Delhi

Meal for two: Rs 2,000 (without liquor).

Must Haves: Tavuklu Pide, Cigar Borek, Urfa Kebab, Woodo Paynir, Baklava Duo, Pumpkin Catalana. (IANS)

Next Story

Gourmet Grubs Squirm Onto American Plate

Culinary director, Jeremy Kittelson, says Linger is committed to changing the American palate. “As much as we love beef,” he says, “there’s no scientist who will tell you cattle farming is a sustainable practice. We should eat more insects."

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Andrew takes a tentative taste of baked, salted mealworm at Rocky Mountain Micro Ranch. VOA

A huge shipping container in the suburbs of Denver, Colorado, is the home of some of the nation’s smallest livestock. Rocky Mountain Micro Ranch is Colorado’s first and only edible insect farm, and one of fewer than three dozen companies in the U.S. growing insects as human food or animal feed.

Wendy Lu McGill started her company in 2015, and today grows nearly 275 kilos of crickets and mealworms every month. “I want to be part of trying to figure out how to feed ourselves better as we have less land and water and a hotter planet and more people to feed,” she explains.

Wendy Lu McGill raises mealworms and crickets to sell to restaurants and food manufacturers.
Wendy Lu McGill raises mealworms and crickets to sell to restaurants and food manufacturers.

Feeding the world’s appetite for protein through beef and even chicken is unsustainable, according to the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization. Protein from bugs is more doable.

On the global menu

Edible insects are a great source of high quality protein and essential minerals such as calcium and iron. Edible grubs — insect larvae — offer all that, plus high quality fat, which is good for brain development.

Insects are part of the diet in many parts of the world. Analysts say the global edible insects market is poised to surpass $710 million by 2024, with some estimates as high as $1.2 billion. And while American consumers comprise a small percentage of that market today, there is growing demand for a variety of insect-infused products.

Thinking small

Amy Franklin is the founder of a non-profit called Farms for Orphans, which is working in the Democratic Republic of Congo. “What we do is farm bugs for food because in other countries where we work, they’re a really, really popular food,” she notes.

In Kinshasa’s markets, vendors sell platters of live wild-caught crickets plus big bowls of pulsating African Palm weevil larvae. These wild insects are only plentiful in certain seasons.

Farms for Orphans works with Congo Relief Mission, FAO in Kinshasa and the University of Kinshasa to set up small-scale palm weevil larvae farms to bring sustainable nutrition and economic empowerment to orphanages. (Courtesy: Farms for Orphans)
Farms for Orphans works with Congo Relief Mission, FAO in Kinshasa and the University of Kinshasa to set up small-scale palm weevil larvae farms to bring sustainable nutrition and economic empowerment to orphanages. (Courtesy: Farms for Orphans). VOA

Franklin’s group helps orphanages grow African Palm weevil larvae year round, in shipping containers. “Most of the orphanages don’t own any land. There really is no opportunity for them to grow a garden or to raise chickens. Insects are a protein source that they can grow in a very small space.”

Changing the American palate

It’s estimated that more than 2 billion people worldwide eat insects every day. And even though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has confirmed that consumption of crickets and mealworms is safe and that they are a natural protein source, many Americans, like Denver grandfather Terry Koelling, remain skeptical. As he and his grandchildren take a tour of Rocky Mountain Micro Ranch, he admits, “I don’t think they are very appealing, as something to put in your mouth. You see them around dead things, and it just does not appeal to me to eat something that wild.”

Koelling gets adventurous at Linger, a Denver restaurant that has had an insect entree on its menu for three years.

Culinary director, Jeremy Kittelson, says Linger is committed to changing the American palate. “As much as we love beef,” he says, “there’s no scientist who will tell you cattle farming is a sustainable practice. We should eat more insects.”

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And so Koelling takes a forkful of the Cricket Soba Noodle dish, with black ants, sesame seeds and crickets mixed in with green tea soba noodles, and garnished with Chapuline Crickets.

“The seasoning’s great!” he says with surprise, adding, “Seems to me there weren’t enough crickets in it!” (VOA)