New Technology to Predict Asthma Attacks in Children: Researchers

A scientific research has lead to a new technology which can predict asthma attacks in kids. It will predict whether children or newborn are at a risk of an asthma attack

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Children with asthma uses inhaler to relieve some of the symptoms
Children with asthma uses inhaler to relieve some of the symptoms, Wikimedia
  • The new technology may help to non-invasively analyze lung sounds in children and newborn and tell if they are at a risk of an asthma attack
  • The researchers have analyzed 70 severely asthmatic children

Washington, July 27, 2017: Good news in the field of Medicine!  Recently, a new technology has been developed which may help to non-invasively predict children or newborn at risk of an asthma attack.

Asthma is the common chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable and recurring symptoms like reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchospasm. Symptoms include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Its symptoms can be prevented by avoiding triggers, such as allergens and irritants, and by inhaling corticosteroids.  Asthma can also be classified as extrinsic that is atopic or intrinsic that is non-atopic. It is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

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Its diagnosis is usually made based on the pattern of symptoms and response to therapy over time. The prevalence of asthma has increased largely since the 1970s. As of 2010, 300 million people were affected worldwide. In 2009 asthma caused 250,000 deaths globally. Despite all this, with proper control of asthma with step down therapy (If the change is accomplished with the same antibiotic as that administered intravenously, then the change is labeled step-down therapy) result is generally good, mentioned ANI  report.

According to researchers, the new technology may help to non-invasively analyze lung sounds in children and newborn and tell if they are at a risk of an asthma attack. The researchers have analyzed 70 severely asthmatic children.

The findings did indicate that the approach was considered useful to predict attack symptoms and for identification of children who are not showing any symptoms of asthma as yet can still have a high risk of asthma attack. The results of this research have been published in Respirology.

– prepared by Kritika Dua of NewsGram. Twitter @DKritika08


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