Wednesday November 20, 2019

Research Claims, Having A Pet Can Help Older People Stay Physically Active

One in six participants said they put their pet's needs ahead of their own. "Although the benefits of pets are significant, social connections and activities with friends and family are also key to quality of life," the study said. 

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"Relations with pets tend to be less complicated than those with humans, and pets are often a source of great enjoyment. They also provide older people with a sense of being needed and loved," said Mary Janevic, researcher at the University of Michigan in the US.  Pixabay

Having a pet can help older people cope with mental and physical health issues. According to a study, more than three-quarters of pet owners said their animals helped in reducing stress.

Two-thirds of pet owners, and 78 per cent of dog owners said pets helped them stay physically active, and 65 per cent people said having a pet helped them connect with other people.

dogs

However, time commitment and cost stood in the way of pet ownership, researchers said. Apart from people reporting difficulty in travelling or enjoying activities outside home due to pets, 18 per cent said having a pet put strain on their budget. Pixabay

In addition, over 70 per cent of the elderly said pets helped them cope with physical or emotional symptoms, and 46 per cent reported it helped take their mind off of pain.

“Relations with pets tend to be less complicated than those with humans, and pets are often a source of great enjoyment. They also provide older people with a sense of being needed and loved,” said Mary Janevic, researcher at the University of Michigan in the US.

For the study, the team included 2,051 people aged 50-80 years.

old people
In addition, over 70 per cent of the elderly said pets helped them cope with physical or emotional symptoms, and 46 per cent reported it helped take their mind off of pain.
Pixabay

However, time commitment and cost stood in the way of pet ownership, researchers said. Apart from people reporting difficulty in travelling or enjoying activities outside home due to pets, 18 per cent said having a pet put strain on their budget.

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One in six participants said they put their pet’s needs ahead of their own. “Although the benefits of pets are significant, social connections and activities with friends and family are also key to quality of life,” the study said.

Helping older people find low-cost ways to support pet ownership, while not sacrificing other important relationships and priorities is an investment in overall mental and physical health,” said Cathleen Connell, Professor at the varsity. (IANS)

 

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Report: Express Grieving Conditions for Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector

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Developing Countries
Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants, but their Condition is not good in Developing Countries. Wikimedia Commons

A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of sanitation workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk.

Sanitation workers everywhere occupy the lowest rung of society and are stigmatized and marginalized because they do the dirty work that other people do not want to do.

The report’s authors – the International Labor Organization, the World Health Organization, the World Bank and Water Aid – say they hope to raise awareness on the plight of sanitation workers and the dehumanizing conditions under which they are forced to work. For example, the report says that many sanitation workers aren’t given the safety training or equipment needed to protect them when handling effluent or fecal sludge.

World Health Organization spokesman Christian Lindmeier says sanitation workers make an important contribution to public health at the risk of their own lives. Poor sanitation, he says, causes more than 430,000 deaths from diarrhea every year and is linked to the spread of other diseases such as cholera, dysentery, typhoid, hepatitis A and polio.

“Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants.… Waste must be correctly treated before being disposed of or used. However, workers often come into direct contact with human waste, working with no equipment or no protection to remove it by hand which exposes them to a long list of health hazards and diseases,” Lindmeier said.

Developing Countries
A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk. VOA

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector. They labor under abusive conditions, have no rights or social protections and are poorly paid.

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The study calls on countries to rectify these wrongs. It urges governments to enact laws and regulations that improve working conditions for sanitation workers and protect their safety and health. It says sanitation workers must be given the equipment and training necessary for the safe, proper disposal of waste. (VOA)