Friday April 19, 2019

Research Claims, Having A Pet Can Help Older People Stay Physically Active

One in six participants said they put their pet's needs ahead of their own. "Although the benefits of pets are significant, social connections and activities with friends and family are also key to quality of life," the study said. 

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"Relations with pets tend to be less complicated than those with humans, and pets are often a source of great enjoyment. They also provide older people with a sense of being needed and loved," said Mary Janevic, researcher at the University of Michigan in the US.  Pixabay

Having a pet can help older people cope with mental and physical health issues. According to a study, more than three-quarters of pet owners said their animals helped in reducing stress.

Two-thirds of pet owners, and 78 per cent of dog owners said pets helped them stay physically active, and 65 per cent people said having a pet helped them connect with other people.

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However, time commitment and cost stood in the way of pet ownership, researchers said. Apart from people reporting difficulty in travelling or enjoying activities outside home due to pets, 18 per cent said having a pet put strain on their budget. Pixabay

In addition, over 70 per cent of the elderly said pets helped them cope with physical or emotional symptoms, and 46 per cent reported it helped take their mind off of pain.

“Relations with pets tend to be less complicated than those with humans, and pets are often a source of great enjoyment. They also provide older people with a sense of being needed and loved,” said Mary Janevic, researcher at the University of Michigan in the US.

For the study, the team included 2,051 people aged 50-80 years.

old people
In addition, over 70 per cent of the elderly said pets helped them cope with physical or emotional symptoms, and 46 per cent reported it helped take their mind off of pain.
Pixabay

However, time commitment and cost stood in the way of pet ownership, researchers said. Apart from people reporting difficulty in travelling or enjoying activities outside home due to pets, 18 per cent said having a pet put strain on their budget.

Also Read: The All New Vaccine Will Eliminate HPV Infection, Claims Study

One in six participants said they put their pet’s needs ahead of their own. “Although the benefits of pets are significant, social connections and activities with friends and family are also key to quality of life,” the study said.

Helping older people find low-cost ways to support pet ownership, while not sacrificing other important relationships and priorities is an investment in overall mental and physical health,” said Cathleen Connell, Professor at the varsity. (IANS)

 

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UN: Geneva Can Improve the Health of Citizens Using Digital Technology

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people's health

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FILE - A doctor uses a smartphone to take a photo of a child with facial deformity before surgery at the Vietnam Cuba hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued its first guidelines on digital health intervention.

The U.N. agency said governments can improve the health of their citizens by using digital technology to make health systems more efficient and responsive to their patients. The United Nations said 51 percent of the world’s population has access to broadband internet service.

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health.

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Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health. Pixabay

She told VOA the technology enables people, even in the remotest settings, to leapfrog into the development of a more effective, inclusive health system. With the use of mobile phones, computers and laptops, she said it is possible to bypass the intervening stages many countries have had to go through.

“So, a health worker in Congo can directly start using a mobile phone if the government is able to provide one to the health worker and get away from filling 30 paper registers, which occupy about one-third of front-line health workers time,” she added.

New recommendations

The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems.

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The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems. Pixabay

A WHO scientist specializing in digital innovations and research, Garrett Mehl, said the recommendations deal with issues such as birth notification.

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“Knowing that a baby has been born is critical to knowing how to provide vaccinations; knowing that the mother needs different post-natal care visits,” he said. “But without knowing that there was a birth that has happened, it is difficult to trigger those events in the health system.”

The guidelines also address privacy concerns.They have recommendations for ensuring that sensitive data, such as issues of sexual and reproductive health, are protected and not put at risk. (VOA)