Monday February 18, 2019
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A Rise In Pregnancy Phobia Due To Social Media Platforms

Treatment for tokophobia includes cognitive behaviour therapy, one-to-one educational sessions with midwives.

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Pregnancy, Breast Cancer
High blood pressure, which had long been defined as a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, dropped to 130 over 80 under guidelines adopted in 2017.

Horror stories of childbirth shared by new mothers on online forums and social media platforms like Facebook could be driving the rise in tokophobia — a pathological terror of pregnancy and childbirth — leading to more C-section requests and abortions, a media report said.

“You just have to Google childbirth and you’re met with a tsunami of horror stories,” BBC Health quoted Catriona Jones, a lecturer at the University of Hull as saying.

If you go to any online forums, “there are women telling their stories of childbirth – ‘Oh, it was terrible’, ‘it was a bloodbath’, ‘this and that happened’. I think that can be quite frightening for women to engage with and read about,” she added.

Tokophobia
The main causes of the condition varied depending on whether you were pregnant with your first or second child. Pixabay

Tokophobia is a mental condition defined as a severe fear or dread of childbirth. It affects around 14 per cent of women, and can be serious enough to lead to requests for caesarean sections, and abortions, the Guardian reported.

According to Professor Louise Kenny of the University of Liverpool, that tokophobia was seriously under-researched and there was little literature on the condition.

“(Stories) shared in safe environments can be quite healing and informative but some women are predisposed to developing a phobia due to stories taken out of context or experiences that are graphic,” she noted.

Kenny added that the main causes of the condition varied depending on whether you were pregnant with your first or second child.

Tokophobia
Tokophobia is a mental condition defined as a severe fear or dread of childbirth. Flickr

“Some women develop it due to an adverse birth experience but for others the main cause can be a history of childhood or adult sexual assault or abuse. It can also be due to previous exposure to a story or something they have seen on TV or social media,” she explained.

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Treatment for tokophobia includes cognitive behaviour therapy, one-to-one educational sessions with midwives, and “graded exposure”, a process that involves having access to labour rooms or operating theatres in a gradual and non-threatening way. (IANS)

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Study Claims, There Should Be Treatment Options Given for Miscarriage

Miscarriage is the most common complication of pregnancy and affects an estimated one in four pregnancies. 

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Miscarriage is the most common complication of pregnancy and affects an estimated one in four pregnancies. Pixabay

Though miscarriage is a traumatic experience for both parents, resulting in feelings of loss and grief that in some cases can lead to anxiety and depression, women experiencing miscarriage should be offered a choice in the treatment they receive, suggests a study.

Miscarriage is the most common complication of pregnancy and affects an estimated one in four pregnancies.

Although guidelines recommend trying to resolve an unsuccessful pregnancy naturally, the new analysis shows that this is only successful in 70 per cent of cases, and potentially comes with complications that are rarely communicated to patients.

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Some women are more keen on having a quick surgical intervention so that they can resume their lifestyle immediately, some are very keen to avoid surgery and prefer to go with a tablet, and others want to take a more natural approach,” Wattar added. Pixabay

The study from the University of Warwick and Queen Mary University of London, demonstrates little to no difference in medical effectiveness in resolving an unsuccessful pregnancy between medical and surgical options.

Thus, the team recommend the doctors to offer women a choice of treatment options for miscarriage to enable them to make an informed decision that takes account of potential uncomfortable side effects, long waiting times and extended periods of recovery.

“What we have to do is provide women with evidence about the benefits and effectiveness of each treatment option and potential side effects so that they can choose what they feel most comfortable with,” said lead author Bassel Wattar from Warwick Medical School.

“Some women are more keen on having a quick surgical intervention so that they can resume their lifestyle immediately, some are very keen to avoid surgery and prefer to go with a tablet, and others want to take a more natural approach,” Wattar added.

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Miscarriage is the most common complication of pregnancy and affects an estimated one in four pregnancies. Pixabay

For the results, published in the journal Human Reproduction Update, the team reviewed 46 trials involving over 9,000 women who experienced spontaneous loss of pregnancy (miscarriage) before 14 weeks gestation.
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During a miscarriage, the body will aim to resolve the unsuccessful pregnancy naturally but conservative treatment can be painful with increased bleeding, increased likelihood of hospital admission, reduced quality of treatment and reduced satisfaction.

However, surgery which include electric vacuum aspiration, and medical treatment with a tablet were found to have similar effectiveness in treating miscarriage as conservative treatment. (IANS)