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A starving Muslim can chop off and eat the body of his wife, says a fatwa issued by Saudi Arabia’s highest religious authority

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By Newsgram Staff Writer

London based daily, al-Quds al-Arabi, reported that Saudi Arabia’s highest religious authority issued a fatwa that allows a starving man to chop off and eat the body of his wife.

The alleged fatwa has caused a stir among the kingdom’s residence and stroked a controversy. It has been reported that Grand Mufti, Abdul Aziz Al ash-Sheikh, said that the act would display the wife’s obedience to her husband and her willingness to become one with his flesh.

The release of the alleged fatwa also took Twitter to a storm where many twitter users expressed their anger against the edict.

A user tweeted that, “Islamic cleric in Saudi issues fatwa for Muslim men: If facing starvation, you can eat ur wife! I appeal all Muslim women to marry Hindu men!”

Another user tweeted, “YES finally women are declared halal! New fatwa: Muslims may eat their wives.

No doubt, why the Grand Mufti previously declared that, “Twitter was the source of all evil.”

On the other hand, Khalid ben Abdel-Rahman El-Shaye’, assistant secretary general of the Global Commission for Introducing the Messenger, told CNN Arabic that, “The truth is that this is fabricated and made up from its basis. These ill thoughts cannot come from any Muslim, regardless of a great scholar who Muslims refer to from around the world. It was made up to create this confusion and damage.”

However, noticing the rising rage of people worldwide, Grand Mufti himself  had to come in front of people to deny the alleged fatwa.

 

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Micro-blogging Site Twitter to Bring ‘Hide Replies’ Feature in June

“We are updating our rules in the next few weeks so they’re shorter, simpler and easier to understand,” they added

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The logo for Twitter is displayed above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. vOA

As part of the efforts to make its platform appear less toxic, Twitter is planning to give people an option to hide replies to their tweets, thereby giving users more control over the nature of conversation they would like to have on the platform.

“Starting in June, we’ll be experimenting with ways to give people more control over their conversations by giving them an option to hide replies to their Tweets,” Donald Hicks, Vice President, Twitter Service and David Gasca, Twitter’s Senior Director, Product Management, Health, wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.

While the feature has the potential to make trolls invisible, it could make it difficult for users to correct wrong statements made by others.

Other social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram already give users much more power in terms of dealing with the comments to their posts, including the option to delete them.

Twitter last year said that making the platform free of abuse, spam and other things that distract from the public conversation is its top priority.

The microblogging site on Tuesday said it had got a lot faster and better at curbing abusive behaviour and hateful content.

Twitter, India, Smartphone
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

“This time last year, 0 per cent of potentially abusive content was flagged to our teams for review proactively. Today, by using technology, 38 per cent of abusive content that’s enforced is surfaced proactively for human review instead of relying on reports from people using Twitter,” Hicks and Gasca wrote.

“The same technology we use to track spam, platform manipulation and other rule violations is helping us flag abusive Tweets to our team for review,” they said.

Twitter said 100,000 accounts were suspended for creating new accounts after a suspension during January-March 2019 — a 45 per cent increase from the same time last year.

Also Read- Mozilla Questions Apple’s Privacy Practice

With a focus on reviewing this type of content, Twitter said it had expanded its teams in key areas and geographies.

“We’ll make it easier for people who use Twitter to share specifics when reporting so we can take action faster, especially when it comes to protecting people’s physical safety,” Hicks and Gasca wrote.

“We are updating our rules in the next few weeks so they’re shorter, simpler and easier to understand,” they added. (IANS)