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AAP is a party made for masses and not for classes, says MLA Akhilesh Pati Tripathi

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By Prateek Kumar

From high-class businessmen to rickshaw-wallahsAkhilesh Pati Tripathi, M.L.A from Model Town constituency in Delhi never makes a distinction among people and regularly conducts Mohallah Sabhas and field visits to understand the miseries and tribulations that people of his constituency are facing.

In a candid chat with NewsGram, Tripathi describes his journey as a politician so far and the immediate changes he wants to make in his tenure as an MLA.

Prateek Kumar: Nowadays, one of the hottest topics of discussion is a conflict between Kejriwal and Jung. What are your views on this?

Akhilesh Pati Tripathi: This is a matter of contention. Lt. Governor acts as the titular head of Delhi whereas the real power is exercised by the Chief Minister and his council of ministers.

In the Articles 239 and 239AA of the Constitution of India, the functions, powers and duties of the Lt. Governor are defined clearly. He is a representative of the President and acts on the aid and recommendation of the council of ministers. The provisions of Article 239B apply in relation to the National Capital Territory of Delhi, as they apply in relation to the Union Territories of Andaman and Nicobar Islands and Pondicherry.

The Sec. 41 of the GNCT (Government of National Capital Territory) of Delhi Act, 1991 clarifies that the Lieutenant Governor shall act in his discretion during a matter that falls outside the range of the powers conferred on the Legislative Assembly like security and law & order.

I think we might file a petition in Supreme Court against this attempt to undermine democracy by the BJP thugs.

PK: Tell us more about your experiences as an MLA yet?

AT: My parents always wanted me to become an IAS or IPS officer but I chose more fruitful methods to bring a change in our society. We have been a victim of past governments’ inaction and the their corruption. Therefore, now we thought to bring a change by ourselves.

Being an MLA is like serving people with holding powers in your hand. Now, I have an authority to ask any department, be it MCD, PWD etc. to take relevant steps if something is wrong. I am indeed feeling proud to serve people in such a manner.

PK: Model Town is a home for rich people. So who are your priorities, High class or lower class?

AT: AAP is a party made for masses and not for classes. Our priority is to serve everybody and we don’t concentrate on a particular section.

PK:  What are your major plans for this area?

AT: I have been living here since my childhood and want to see this place as one of the best places in Delhi. Recently, we have started ‘Smart Classes’ in a nearby government school and have provided relaxations in fees and other aids. Education is our main agenda to focus upon. And we have been doing that since I took the charge as an MLA.

PK: AAP decided to make Delhi a Wi-fi enabled city. How much time will it take to turn it into a reality and are there any problems you are facing in the process?

AT: The projected time is February 2016. Yes, we are also facing some problems as approvals from many departments are still pending. Maybe they don’t want us to take these steps as it will definitely reduce the internet net users using their mobile data, which will eventually affect the businesses of mobile operators.

PK:  Your views on Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s recent foreign tours?

AT: Modi really needs to stop criticizing India abroad. It’s just like you are going for a job interview and criticizing your last company. He needs to understand that it will not engender trust in the people you are talking to. It’s time for a 64-year-old to develop an understanding of a 24-year-old at least.

 

Next Story

Are There Enough Jobs In Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Led India?

“More young people are entering the labor force, millions want to leave agriculture but can’t find construction work because construction activity has slowed down because the investment rate in the economy has slowed down.”

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VOA
Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party dismisses concerns about the job data saying it does not capture the real picture because it focuses only on the 15 percent of Indians who work in the formal economy. Pixabay

For people streaming in from rural areas around New Delhi, the first stop is a collection of busy city intersections where contractors select daily wage labor from the crowds of young and old waiting every morning to get work.

Many standing at these intersections say they get work for barely half the month. “I have the ability to work hard. I never turn down any work. But I would prefer to get a cleaner, permanent job,” says 29-year-old Tek Chand. “The problem is one day I have money to buy rations, the next day I don’t.” Like millions of others, he migrated from his village three years ago to seek work and a better life in the city.

FILE - Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, center, arrives with his cabinet colleagues on the opening day of the budget session of the Indian Parliament, in New Delhi, Jan. 31, 2019.
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, center, arrives with his cabinet colleagues on the opening day of the budget session of the Indian Parliament, in New Delhi, Jan. 31, 2019. VOA
As India prepares for general elections on April 11, Prime Minister Narendra Modi is being attacked by opposition parties for failing to make good on a promise he made in 2014 to create millions of jobs for India’s huge young population. Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party rebuts that criticism and says India is generating new opportunities as it becomes one of the world’s fastest growing major economies.

Job creation is a massive challenge for a nation with one of the world’s youngest populations — half the country’s 1.3 billion people are under the age of 25.

Recent data shows that joblessness has soared to record high levels. Opposition parties have made joblessness one of their principal election planks and have accused the prime minister of failing the estimated 8 to 10 million young people who enter the workforce every year.

The independent Mumbai-based Center for Monitoring Indian Economy estimates that unemployment reached 7.2 percent last month and that 11 million jobs were lost in 2018. With a working population of 500 million, that translates into more than 30 million people waiting for jobs. An unpublished official survey that showed unemployment at a 45-year-high has also been widely quoted by Indian media.

India's main opposition Congress party President Rahul Gandhi speaks during a public meeting at Adalaj in Gandhinagar, India, March 12, 2019.
India’s main opposition Congress party President Rahul Gandhi speaks during a public meeting at Adalaj in Gandhinagar, India, March 12, 2019. VOA

On the campaign trail, the head of the main opposition Congress Party, Rahul Gandhi, who is seen as Modi’s principal challenger, talks repeatedly about a “jobs crisis.”

“Our government is refusing to accept that we have a massive crisis and potential disaster in front of us,” Gandhi told a group of university students in New Delhi recently, many who will be first time voters.

Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party dismisses concerns about the job data saying it does not capture the real picture because it focuses only on the 15 percent of Indians who work in the formal economy. It points to a recent industry report that jobs have been created in the medium and small sectors.

The BJP says millions of people have found work in the transport and infrastructure sectors or as delivery boys in booming online businesses as India becomes one of the world’s fastest growing major economies. They point out that the issue is not jobs but livelihoods, and point to millions of people who are not counted in job data.

They are self-employed people like cab owner Chain Pal Singh. As the app based taxi business boomed, Singh’s friend, who operated a cab, persuaded him to quit his job and take out a loan to buy a car. His decision has paid off — in four years he has earned enough money to invest in two more cabs.

Singh says he is much better off than when he held a job. “I used to earn about $225 dollars a month. Now in some months I can earn almost double that amount. Its beneficial for me.”

Following defeats in key state elections in December, Prime Minister Narendra Modi told parliament last month, “This truth has to be acknowledged. The unorganized sector has 80 to 85 percent of the employment.” He pointed to millions of commercial vehicles sold in recent years and questioned if they had not generated jobs for drivers.

Economists admit India’s large informal sector has made it difficult to calculate employment, but they say joblessness or underemployment remains the country’s biggest challenge. While scarcity of jobs is not a new problem, two disruptive economic steps in the last two years exacerbated the problem.

In 2016 a sweeping currency ban meant to tackle the problem of illegal cash, dried up jobs as it created huge currency shortages, particularly in small businesses and in the countryside. A poorly-implemented tax reform known as the Goods and Services Tax a few months later was another blow to businesses.

Meanwhile, Modi’s “Made in India” campaign, which aimed at making India a manufacturing hub like China, has made a slow start and sluggish labor-intensive sectors cannot cater to growing numbers of job seekers.

“We can’t keep patting ourselves on the back that we are the fastest growing economy specially if all these other indicators are not growing at a rate that will absorb the growing labor force,” says Santosh Mehrotra, a human development economist at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi.

“More young people are entering the labor force, millions want to leave agriculture but can’t find construction work because construction activity has slowed down because the investment rate in the economy has slowed down.”

Also Read: The Mental Health ‘Epidemic’: About Six in Ten Teen Say, They Feel A Lot Of Pressure To Get Good Grades

He points out that exports, another sector that created a number of jobs has also not been performing well.

As the campaign heats up, the opposition will try to keep the spotlight on jobs, or lack of them, even as the BJP tries to focus on national security following a recent confrontation with Pakistan. The final verdict on whether to give Prime Minister Modi a second term in office will be delivered by millions of voters when they cast their ballots. (VOA)

One response to “Are There Enough Jobs In Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Led India?”

  1. If the employment picture is bleak despite the construction of so many more Kilometers of roads, railways, air ports, bridges, toilets and other infrastructures compared to the five or even ten years of UPA government, imagine where we would be if we had UPA III government .