Saturday February 16, 2019

AAPI’s Global Healthcare Summit 2016 will focus on women’s health issues

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Women

By Shilpika Srivastava

The World Health Organization’s 2000 World Health Report ranks India’s healthcare system at 112 out of 190 countries, which presents a sad picture of India. When compared to the United States of America, which spends 18% of its national GDP towards healthcare services, India spends a meager 4.2%. The problem is exacerbated by the huge gaps between the rural and urban populations.

Furthermore, sanitation facilities are only available to a small population of India, which greatly impact the women inhabitants, especially in rural areas.

With a mission to facilitate excellence in patient care, American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin (AAPI) is working towards creating means for better health facilities in India.

Anwar Feroz Siddiqi, Honorary Advisor for AAPI, told NewsGram how women’s health is significant for the future generations. He said that women, being someone’s daughter, wife, mother, take care of every member of the family, and helps in their individual development. However, in that entire scenario, she is the one who greatly neglects and sacrifices her health leading to tons of health issues. “Keep a woman healthy for a happy and healthy family,” he added.

Commenting on where AAPI’s 10th Global Healthcare Summit 2016 to be held in Delhi, Siddiqi said the summit will majorly focus on brain injuries and women related issues.

Ironically, despite the international commitment, women belonging to the poorer classes and marginalized sections face differential access to health care facilities.

The United Nations estimated that in the developing world as a whole, one third of all pregnant women receive no health care during pregnancy. It also projected that women account for 70% of the world’s poor and poverty ridden, marred by inequality and limited decision making power; this in turn also adversely impacts their health.

Women, being the nation builder, are worthy of special concern in the health sector. In addition, the time demands for a need to explore and understand the health concerns of women belonging to marginalized sections, since they are particularly exposed to discrimination.

Next Story

Diet Drinks Increase Stroke Chances in Postmenopausal Women

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. 

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The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. Pixabay

Are diet drinks your choice? Beware, your heart could be at risk. A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say.

The stroke is was caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, showed that compared with women who consumed diet drinks less than once a week or not at all, women who consumed two or more artificially sweetened beverages per day were 23 per cent more likely to have a stroke, 31 per cent more likely to have ischemic stroke, and 29 per cent were at risk of developing heart disease (fatal or non-fatal heart attack).

In addition, there was a 16 per cent risk of deaths from any cause.

 

 

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A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say. Pixabay

Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes, findings revealed.

“Many well-meaning people, especially those who are overweight or obese, drink low-calorie sweetened drinks to cut calories in their diet. Our research and other observational studies have shown that artificially-sweetened beverages may not be harmless and high consumption is associated with a higher risk of stroke and heart disease,” said lead author Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Associate Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the US.

For the study, researchers included 81,714 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 years.

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women.

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Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes. Pixabay

Also Read: Top 3 Factors That Play a Major Role in Fertility Issues in Women

“The American Heart Association suggests water as the best choice for a no-calorie beverage,” suggested Rachel K. Johnson, Professor at the University of Vermont in the US.

“Since long-term clinical trial data are not available on the effects of low-calorie sweetened drinks and cardiovascular health, given their lack of nutritional value, it may be prudent to limit their prolonged use,” Johnson added. (IANS)