Wednesday July 17, 2019

AAPI’s Global Healthcare Summit 2016 will focus on women’s health issues

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Women

By Shilpika Srivastava

The World Health Organization’s 2000 World Health Report ranks India’s healthcare system at 112 out of 190 countries, which presents a sad picture of India. When compared to the United States of America, which spends 18% of its national GDP towards healthcare services, India spends a meager 4.2%. The problem is exacerbated by the huge gaps between the rural and urban populations.

Furthermore, sanitation facilities are only available to a small population of India, which greatly impact the women inhabitants, especially in rural areas.

With a mission to facilitate excellence in patient care, American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin (AAPI) is working towards creating means for better health facilities in India.

Anwar Feroz Siddiqi, Honorary Advisor for AAPI, told NewsGram how women’s health is significant for the future generations. He said that women, being someone’s daughter, wife, mother, take care of every member of the family, and helps in their individual development. However, in that entire scenario, she is the one who greatly neglects and sacrifices her health leading to tons of health issues. “Keep a woman healthy for a happy and healthy family,” he added.

Commenting on where AAPI’s 10th Global Healthcare Summit 2016 to be held in Delhi, Siddiqi said the summit will majorly focus on brain injuries and women related issues.

Ironically, despite the international commitment, women belonging to the poorer classes and marginalized sections face differential access to health care facilities.

The United Nations estimated that in the developing world as a whole, one third of all pregnant women receive no health care during pregnancy. It also projected that women account for 70% of the world’s poor and poverty ridden, marred by inequality and limited decision making power; this in turn also adversely impacts their health.

Women, being the nation builder, are worthy of special concern in the health sector. In addition, the time demands for a need to explore and understand the health concerns of women belonging to marginalized sections, since they are particularly exposed to discrimination.

Next Story

New Reusable Device Which can Help Women with Breast Cancer in Lower-Income Countries

Innovation in cancer care doesn't always mean that you have to create an entirely new treatment

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Breast Cancer, Device, Women
According to the study published in the journal PLOS One, the research team wanted to create a tissue-freezing tool that uses carbon dioxide. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a new reusable device which can help women with breast cancer in lower-income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

According to the study published in the journal PLOS One, the research team wanted to create a tissue-freezing tool that uses carbon dioxide, which is already widely available in most rural areas thanks to the popularity of carbonated drinks.

“Innovation in cancer care doesn’t always mean that you have to create an entirely new treatment. Sometimes it means radically innovating on proven therapies such that they’re redesigned to be accessible to the majority of the world’s population,” said the study’s first author Bailey Surtees from the Johns Hopkins University.

For the study, the research team tested their tool in three experiments to ensure it could remain cold enough in conditions similar to the human breast and successfully kill tumour tissues.

Breast Cancer, Device, Women
Researchers have developed a new reusable device which can help women with breast cancer in lower-income countries by using carbon dioxide. Pixabay

In the first experiment, the team used the tool on jars of ultrasound gel, which thermodynamically mimics human breast tissue, to determine whether it could successfully reach standard freezing temperatures killing tissues and form consistent iceballs.

In all the trials, the device formed large enough iceballs and reached temperatures below -40 degrees Celsius, which meets standard freezing temperatures for tissue death for similar devices in the United States.

For the second experiment, the team treated 9 rats with 10 mammary tumours. Afterwards, they looked at the tissues under a microscope and confirmed that the tool successfully killed 85 per cent or more tissues for all tumours.

Finally, the team tested the tool’s ability to reach temperatures cold enough for tissue destruction in the normal liver of a pig, which has a temperature similar to a human breast.

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The device was successfully able to stay cold enough during the entire experiment to kill the target tissue. (IANS)