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About 50% Smartphones Sold in 2018 Will Have AI-Powered Assistant, Says report

The report said the market share of Google's AI assistant is expected to climb to 51.3 per cent this year and 60.6 per cent by 2023

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On-device AI is growing fast among smartphone vendors and by 2023, around 90 per cent of smartphones will have a built-in AI assistant, according to the Strategy Analytics report. Pixabay

About half of smartphones sold globally this year will have an Artificial Intelligence (AI)-powered assistant, a report by an industry consulting firm showed Sunday.

According to Strategy Analytics (SA) Inc., 47.7 per cent of smartphones sold on the global market will be equipped with some kind of on-device AI assistant, up from 36.6 per cent last year, Yonhap news agency reported.

On-device AI is growing fast among smartphone vendors and by 2023, around 90 per cent of smartphones will have a built-in AI assistant, according to the Strategy Analytics report.

Also Read: Sony Unveils The World’s First 48MP Smartphone Sensor

In 2017, Google Assistant rose to be the top AI assistant with a 46.7 per cent market share, followed by Apple’s Siri with 40.1 per cent, it said.

The report said the market share of Google’s AI assistant is expected to climb to 51.3 per cent this year and 60.6 per cent by 2023. (IANS)

Next Story

Rare Earth Metals in Smartphones Can Now Be Tracked

Extracting rare earths from the environment or from industrial samples, like waste water from mines or coal waste products, is generally very challenging and expensive.

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To develop the sensor, the researchers from Pennsylvania State University in the US used a protein they recently described and subsequently used to explore the biology of bacteria that use lanthanides. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a new protein-based sensor that can detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, in a more efficient and cost-effective way.

The sensor changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals, according to the study published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The protein undergoes a shape change when it binds to lanthanides, which is key for the sensor’s fluorescence to “turn on”, said the study.

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“These elements are called rare earths, and they include chemical elements of atomic weight 57 to 71 on the periodic table,” Cotruvo added. Pixabay

To develop the sensor, the researchers from Pennsylvania State University in the US used a protein they recently described and subsequently used to explore the biology of bacteria that use lanthanides.

“Lanthanides are used in a variety of current technologies, including the screens and electronics of smartphones, batteries of electric cars, satellites, and lasers,” said Joseph Cotruvo, Assistant Professor at Penn State and senior author of the study.

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The sensor changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals, according to the study published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Pixabay

“These elements are called rare earths, and they include chemical elements of atomic weight 57 to 71 on the periodic table,” Cotruvo added.

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Extracting rare earths from the environment or from industrial samples, like waste water from mines or coal waste products, is generally very challenging and expensive.

“We developed a protein-based sensor that can detect tiny amounts of lanthanides in a sample, letting us know if it’s worth investing resources to extract these important metals,” Cotruvo said. (IANS)