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According to Study, Public tend to Blame Accidents on Drivers More than Automatic Cars

The study found that in crashes involving a car that has dual human and AI controls, the public presume that the machine is less accountable

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Accidents
Study found that when one driver makes an error leading to Accidents, they were blamed more - regardless of whether that driver is a machine or a human. Pixabay

The public were more likely to blame Accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on the driver rather than the machine, according to a new study.

For the study published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, the researchers from the University of Exeter examined how the general public attribute blame in accidents involving self-driving cars.

“It seems like if we leave it to the general public, they may unintentionally go soft on AV manufacturers to improve their safety standards,” said study researcher Edmond Awad.

The study found that in crashes involving a car that has dual human and AI controls, the public presume that the machine is less accountable.

For the study, the research team asked members of the public to consider hypothetical cases in which a pedestrian was killed by a car operated under shared control between humans and machines – and to indicate how blame should be allocated.

It found that when one driver makes an error, they were blamed more – regardless of whether that driver is a machine or a human.

Significantly, however, when both drivers make errors in cases of human-machine shared-control vehicles, the blame attributed to the machine is reduced.

Accidents
The public were more likely to blame accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on the driver rather than the machine, according to a new study. Pixabay

There is a greater presumption that the human driver should be held more accountable.

The research team believe the results could have significant ramifications for how juries could apportion blame in future death-crash cases.

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While the pursuit of creating fully ‘driverless’ cars has been the goal for many manufacturers in recent years, they still remain some way off from coming to fruition, the study said. (IANS)

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According to NCRB Report, Suicide Rates in India Saw a Decline in 2016 with 10.3%

As per the report, the rate of accidental deaths (per lakh of population) has remained unchanged at 32.8 per cent in 2016

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Suicide
The Suicide rate in cities in 2016 was 13 per cent as compared to the all-India suicide rate of 10.3 per cent. Pixabay

The all-India suicide rate per lakh population saw a decline in 2016 with 10.3 per cent Suicide cases reported compared to the 10.6 per cent lodged in 2015, the annual ‘Accidental Deaths & Suicides in India’ (ADSI) data released by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) said.

The major causes of suicides are due to family problems not related to marriage (29.2 per cent) and ‘illness’ (17.1 per cent), marriage related issues (5.3 per cent) and drug abuse or alcohol addiction (4 per cent), said the ADSI-2016 report furnished by 36 states and Union Territories (UTs) and 53 Metropolitan Cities (which have a population of 1 million or 10 lakh or more as per the population Census, 2011) by State Crime Records Bureaus and Crime Investigation Departments.

The suicide rate in cities in 2016 was 13 per cent as compared to the all-India suicide rate of 10.3 per cent.

As per the report, the rate of accidental deaths (per lakh of population) has remained unchanged at 32.8 per cent in 2016.

A total of 8,684 deaths occurred in the country due to causes attributable to forces of nature during 2016. Of these accidental deaths, 38.2 per cent deaths occurred due to ‘Lightning’, 15.4 per cent deaths due to ‘Heat or Sun Stroke’ and 8.9 per cent deaths due to ‘Flood’.

Suicide
The major causes of Suicide Cases are due to family problems not related to marriage (29.2 per cent) and ‘illness’ (17.1 per cent), marriage related issues (5.3 per cent) and drug abuse or alcohol addiction (4 per cent). Pixabay

A total of 4,09,537 persons died in accidental deaths due to ‘Other Causes’ (not attributable to nature) during 2016. The major causes of accidental deaths were ‘Traffic Accidents’ (43.4 per cent), ‘Sudden Deaths’ (10.2 per cent), ‘Drowning’ (7.3 per cent), ‘Poisoning’ (5.6 per cent), ‘Falls’ (4.2 per cent) and ‘Accidental Fire’ (4.1 per cent).

While releasing the data, the NCRB clarified that it only compiles and collates the information and presents it in the form of this report. The NCRB is not responsible for the authenticity of the information, as data is being furnished by states and UTs.

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It said that the data collection for ADSI-2017 and 2018 reports was initiated in July this year and the reports are planned to be released by December 31. (IANS)