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Actress Yami Gautam wants to be a Part of Costume Drama or Dance Based Movie

Yami Gautam shares her fitness secrets and is interested in being a part of a dance based movie.

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Yami Gautam
Yami Gautam. wikimedia commons
  • Actress Yami Gautam is interested in doing a Dance based movie or costume Drama.

Yami Gautam tries out different ways to stay fit

The actress Yami Gautam, who got associated with Quaker Oats to talk about the importance of consuming a healthy breakfast through a live Facebook session, is willing to change her physical appearance as long as a project is convincing enough.

“It totally depends. It’s not easy, but I cannot give a subjective answer to this question. But I feel if there is a role that I love and love the team, then I would take it as it comes,” said the model turned actress.

Apart from her work, the “Sanam Re” actress is also known for being fit. She says she makes a “conscious effort to stay fit and feel good”.

“The kind of profession I am in, and the active lifestyle we all lead requires us to be on our toes all the time. Which is why it becomes all the more important to maintain a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Keeping fit is not about a good core or a good body, it is a lifestyle choice which reflects every day. It even translates to little things like good skin and hair, amongst others,” Yami said.

What is her fitness regime?

“I do mostly functional training. I do very little weights. As I said, it always is an amalgamation of pure workout and your diet. It doesn’t mean cutting down food. It means including more healthy stuff in your food, that gives you the right nutrition intake.”

Yami feels each individual finds their own way to a healthy lifestyle.

“It’s not always restricted to the gym. I dance, someone does yoga, someone goes cycling. I think any sort of physical activity and right food is very important. I think even right food doesn’t mean it has to be bland and boring.

“Healthy food can be yum too. For instance, as part of Breakfasts of India, I cooked Dakshini Toast with Quaker Oats – a recipe that was healthy, tasty and easy to make. I truly believe you must enjoy what you are eating.

“Keep one day to indulge, I never call it a ‘cheat day’ because I feel you deserve it,” the Yami Gautam said.(IANS)

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Healthy Lifestyle Can Cut Risk of Developing Alzheimer Even if You Have High Genetic Risk: Study

After about eight years of study, 1.8% of those with high genetic risk and poor lifestyles had developed dementia versus 0.6% of folks with low genetic risk and healthy habits

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healthy lifestyle, alzheimer
Living a healthy lifestyle can reduce the risk of Alzheimer's or other dementia, even if you have a genetic risk, a large study found. VOA

A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found.

People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more likely to develop dementia versus those with low genetic risk and good habits, researchers reported Sunday. Regardless of how much genetic risk someone had, a good diet, adequate exercise, limiting alcohol and not smoking made dementia less likely.

“I consider that good news,” said John Haaga of the U.S. National Institute on Aging, one of the study’s many sponsors. “No one can guarantee you’ll escape this awful disease” but you can tip the odds in your favor with clean living, he said. Results were discussed at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Los Angeles and published online by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

50 million people

About 50 million people have dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type. Genes and lifestyle contribute to many diseases, but researchers only recently have had the tools and information to do large studies to see how much each factor matters.

healthy lifestyle, alzheimer
After about eight years of study, 1.8% of those with high genetic risk and poor lifestyles had developed dementia versus 0.6% of folks with low genetic risk and healthy habits. Pixabay

One such study a few years ago found that healthy living could help overcome genetic risk for heart disease. Now researchers have shown the same to be true for dementia.

Dr. Elzbieta Kuzma and colleagues at the University of Exeter Medical School in England used the UK Biobank to study nearly 200,000 people 60 or older with no signs or symptoms of dementia at the start. Their genetic risk was classified as high, medium or low based on dozens of mutations known to affect dementia. They also were grouped by lifestyle factors.

By the numbers

After about eight years of study, 1.8% of those with high genetic risk and poor lifestyles had developed dementia versus 0.6% of folks with low genetic risk and healthy habits. Among those with the highest genetic risk, just more than 1% of those with favorable lifestyles developed dementia compared to nearly 2% of those with poor lifestyles.

One limitation: Researchers only had information on mutations affecting people of European ancestry, so it’s not known whether the same is true for other racial or ethnic groups.

alzheimer, healthy lifestyle
Among those with the highest genetic risk, just more than 1% of those with favorable lifestyles developed dementia compared to nearly 2% of those with poor lifestyles. Pixabay

Genes are not destiny

The results should give encouragement to people who fear that gene mutations alone determine their destiny, said Dr. Rudy Tanzi, a genetics expert at Massachusetts General Hospital. Less than 5% of the ones tied to Alzheimer’s are “fully penetrant,” meaning that they guarantee you’ll get the disease, he said.

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“That means that with 95% of the mutations, your lifestyle will make a difference,” Tanzi said. “Don’t be too worried about your genetics. Spend more time being mindful of living a healthy life.”

One previous study in Sweden and Finland rigorously tested the effect of a healthy lifestyle by assigning one group to follow one and included a comparison group that did not. It concluded that healthy habits could help prevent mental decline. The Alzheimer’s Association is sponsoring a similar study underway now in the United States. Healthy living also is the focus of new dementia prevention guidelines that the World Health Organization released in February. (VOA)