Monday December 10, 2018

Acupuncture May Boost Chances Of Pregnancy Through IVF

In the new study, the team analyzed data from 3,271 women and nearly 4,400 cycles

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Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese form of pain relieving treatment by inserting thin needles at specific points in the body. Pixabay
Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese form of pain relieving treatment by inserting thin needles at specific points in the body. Pixabay
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If you are looking forward to conceiving anytime soon via in vitro fertilization (IVF), then undertaking an acupuncture therapy prior to the process may boost your chances of getting pregnant by six percent, a new study has claimed.

Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese form of pain relieving treatment by inserting thin needles at specific points in the body.

The study found that acupuncture stimulates the sensory nerves under the skin and muscles of the body along with an increased blood flow to the uterus, which makes it more receptive to the embryo implanting when it is transferred during IVF.

ALSO READ: Acupuncture can curb hot flashes in breast cancer patients: Study

Previous studies have found acupuncture nearly doubles the chances of a woman conceiving with IVF. Pixabay
Previous studies have found acupuncture nearly doubles the chances of a woman conceiving with IVF. Pixabay

“Acupuncture may not be entirely conventional, but there’s a growing body of evidence to suggest that it can be effective when it comes to IVF,” Hana Visnova, Medical Director at IVF Cube in Prague, Czech Republic, was quoted as saying in the Daily Mail.

In the new study, the team analyzed data from 3,271 women and nearly 4,400 cycles.

Of the 4,087 cycles without acupuncture, 2,458 pregnancies were recorded, giving a pregnancy rate of 60 percent.

Of the 301 cycles with acupuncture, there were 201 conceptions — giving a higher pregnancy rate of 66 percent.

Moreover, acupuncture has been proven to have a direct impact on a body's biology, said Tereza Rankin, acupuncturist at the IVF Cube. Pixabay
Moreover, acupuncture has been proven to have a direct impact on a body’s biology, said Tereza Rankin, acupuncturist at the IVF Cube. Pixabay

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“There’s evidence that acupuncture can increase blood flow to the uterus while producing neurotransmitters which help with pain relief,” she said

“It can make the lining of the uterus more receptive to the embryo when it’s transferred, therefore aiding implantation during IVF.

“And the therapy can also help to relax the cervix, preventing any painful cramps and again helping with the embryo transfer,” Rakin noted.

However, the British Fertility Society says there’s no evidence that having acupuncture or Chinese herbal medicine treatment around the time of assisted conception increases the likelihood of subsequent pregnancy, the report said. (IANS)

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First Successful Case Of Womb Transplant in Brazil

In the Brazilian case, the recipient had been born without a uterus due to a condition called Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. The donor was 45 and died of a stroke.

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Womb Transplant
Medical team hold the first baby born via uterus transplant from a deceased donor at the hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. VOA

A woman in Brazil who received a womb transplanted from a deceased donor has given birth to a baby girl in the first successful case of its kind, doctors reported.

The case, published in The Lancet medical journal, involved connecting veins from the donor uterus with the recipient’s veins, as well as linking arteries, ligaments and vaginal canals.

It comes after 10 previously known cases of uterus transplants from deceased donors – in the United States, the Czech Republic and Turkey – failed to produce a live birth.

The girl born in the Brazilian case was delivered via caesarean section at 35 weeks and three days, and weighed 2,550 grams (nearly 6 lbs), the case study said.

Dani Ejzenberg, a doctor at Brazil’s Sao Paulo University hospital who led the research, said the transplant – carried out in September 2016 when the recipient was 32 – shows the technique is feasible and could offer women with uterine infertility access to a larger pool of potential donors.

Womb
. The woman’s previously fertilized and frozen eggs were implanted after seven months and 10 days later she was confirmed pregnant.. Pixabay

The current norm for receiving a womb transplant is that the organ would come from a live family member willing to donate it.

“The numbers of people willing and committed to donate organs upon their own deaths are far larger than those of live donors, offering a much wider potential donor population,” Ejzenberg said in a statement about the results.

She added, however, that the outcomes and effects of womb donations from live and deceased donors have yet to be compared, and said the technique could still be refined and optimised.

The first baby born after a live donor womb transplant was in Sweden in 2013. Scientists have so far reported a total of 39 procedures of this kind, resulting in 11 live births.

Experts estimate that infertility affects around 10 to 15 percent of couples of reproductive age worldwide. Of this group, around one in 500 women have uterine problems.

Before uterus transplants became possible, the only options to have a child were adoption or surrogacy.

Infants, baby, WOmb
The case, published in The Lancet medical journal, involved connecting veins from the donor uterus with the recipient’s veins. Pixabay

In the Brazilian case, the recipient had been born without a uterus due to a condition called Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. The donor was 45 and died of a stroke.

Also Read: Pregnancy is Possible For Survivors of Breast Cancer

Five months after the transplant, Ejzenberg’s team wrote, the uterus showed no signs of rejection, ultrasound scans were normal, and the recipient was having regular menstruation. The woman’s previously fertilized and frozen eggs were implanted after seven months and 10 days later she was confirmed pregnant.

At seven months and 20 days – when the case study report was submitted to The Lancet – the baby girl was continuing to breastfeed and weighed 7.2 kg (16 lb). (VOA)