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Adding Tabletop Device can Improve Restaurant Services and Increase Revenues

Published in the journal Management Science, the findings reveal that restaurants should introduce tabletop technology

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Now, a recent study shows that adding a tabletop device can improve restaurant services and increase revenues. Pixabay

 We’ve all been there…you’re out to eat and in need of a refill or the check and the wait staff is nowhere to be found. Now, a recent study shows that adding a tabletop device can improve restaurant services and increase revenues.

Published in the journal Management Science, the findings reveal that restaurants should introduce tabletop technology in a demonstrated way to improve service and satisfaction.

Tabletop technology allows customers to view menu items, re-order beverages, pay for the meal, play games and browse news content. The technology is meant to assist waiters, not replace them.

“We estimate one per cent sales lift per check which translates into $2 million extra sales or $1 million profit per month in the short-run, and that’s a conservative estimate,” said Tom Fangyun Tan, Associate Professor at Southern Methodist University in the US.

Tabletop, Device, Restaurant
We’ve all been there…you’re out to eat and in need of a refill or the check and the wait staff is nowhere to be found. Pixabay

The research reveals tabletop technology is likely to improve sales by 1 per cent per check and reduce meal duration by 10 per cent. The combination of these two effects increase the sales per minute or sales productivity by 11 per cent.

The data was collected from a restaurant chain here in the US that owns 66 establishments. It looked at transaction data from 2012 to 2014 or 2.6 million transactions.

“A good, attentive waiter already does what the tabletop device does…a less attentive or forgetful waiter does not, but relies more on the device, which makes up for the lacking ability resulting in faster service,” Tan said.

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The data suggest that restaurants re-evaluate their operations to fully reap the benefits of tabletop technology. (IANS)

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New Reusable Device Which can Help Women with Breast Cancer in Lower-Income Countries

Innovation in cancer care doesn't always mean that you have to create an entirely new treatment

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Breast Cancer, Device, Women
According to the study published in the journal PLOS One, the research team wanted to create a tissue-freezing tool that uses carbon dioxide. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a new reusable device which can help women with breast cancer in lower-income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

According to the study published in the journal PLOS One, the research team wanted to create a tissue-freezing tool that uses carbon dioxide, which is already widely available in most rural areas thanks to the popularity of carbonated drinks.

“Innovation in cancer care doesn’t always mean that you have to create an entirely new treatment. Sometimes it means radically innovating on proven therapies such that they’re redesigned to be accessible to the majority of the world’s population,” said the study’s first author Bailey Surtees from the Johns Hopkins University.

For the study, the research team tested their tool in three experiments to ensure it could remain cold enough in conditions similar to the human breast and successfully kill tumour tissues.

Breast Cancer, Device, Women
Researchers have developed a new reusable device which can help women with breast cancer in lower-income countries by using carbon dioxide. Pixabay

In the first experiment, the team used the tool on jars of ultrasound gel, which thermodynamically mimics human breast tissue, to determine whether it could successfully reach standard freezing temperatures killing tissues and form consistent iceballs.

In all the trials, the device formed large enough iceballs and reached temperatures below -40 degrees Celsius, which meets standard freezing temperatures for tissue death for similar devices in the United States.

For the second experiment, the team treated 9 rats with 10 mammary tumours. Afterwards, they looked at the tissues under a microscope and confirmed that the tool successfully killed 85 per cent or more tissues for all tumours.

Finally, the team tested the tool’s ability to reach temperatures cold enough for tissue destruction in the normal liver of a pig, which has a temperature similar to a human breast.

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The device was successfully able to stay cold enough during the entire experiment to kill the target tissue. (IANS)