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Important to Address The Uncertainties Rising Due To Technological Advances: Study

The commission study indicates it is reasonable to assume that humans and robots will be able to live in harmony with one another.

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Robots
Robots work on the cab of a 2019 Ram pickup at the Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Sterling Heights Assembly Plant in Sterling Heights, Mich., Oct. 22, 2018. Manufacturing is one are where robots are part of the workforce. VOA

The world of work is going through a major transformation. Technological advances are creating new jobs and at the same time leaving many people behind as their skills are no longer needed. A new study by the International Labor Organization’s Global Commission on the Future of Work addresses the many uncertainties arising from this new reality.

The International Labor Organization agrees artificial intelligence, automation and robotics will lead to job losses, as people’s skills become obsolete. But it says these same technological advances, along with the greening of economies also will create millions of new jobs.

Change is coming

The co-chair of the ILO Global Commission on the Future of Work, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, says these advances offer many opportunities. But he warns people must harness the new technologies for the world of work and not be allowed to control the future shape of work.

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South African President Cyril Ramaphosa and International Labour Organization Director-General Guy Ryder launch the report of the Global Commission on the Future of Work at a news conference held at ILO headquarters in Geneva, Jan. 22, 2019. VOA

“In the 20th century, we established that labor is not a commodity. In the 21st century, we must also ensure that labor is not a robot. We propose a human in command type of approach ensuring that technology frees workers and improves work rather than reducing their control,” he said.

Ramaphosa says change is inevitable and will happen whether people like it or not.

“We believe that we would rather be ahead of the curve rather than behind it and get the developments that are unfolding to shape us and to lead us. We need to be ahead so that we can shape the type of world of work that we want to see,” he said.

Human-centered conversation

In its study, the 27-member commission has adopted a human-centered approach. At this time of unprecedented change, ILO Director-General Guy Ryder says having people at the heart of this debate is critical for achieving a decent future of work.

Robots
A robot waiter serves customers at a cafe in Budapest, Hungary, Jan. 24, 2019. VOA

“I think people, families, countries around the world are indeed grappling with the challenges and the opportunities of transformative change at work and the ambition of our commission … is, in a very concise and a very clear, and I think above all an action oriented way to try to set out a road map of how we can indeed seize the opportunities and deal satisfactorily with those challenges,” Ryder said.

Ten recommendations

After 15 months of work, the commission has come up with 10 recommendations for attaining decent and sustainable work. They include a call for a universal labor guarantee to protect workers’ rights, an adequate living wage and a safe workplace.

The commission proposes social protection measures from birth to old age. It says technological change must be managed to boost decent work. It says the gender gap should be closed and equality achieved in the workplace.

Ryder says the report puts a heavy emphasis on life-long learning and the renewal of skills throughout one’s working life.

Artificial Intelligence
Pods full of merchandise are moved around the floor by robotic drives, named Amazon robots, at the Amazon fulfillment center in the Staten Island borough of New York, Dec. 5, 2018. VOA

“With the rapidity of change being what it is at work today,” he said, “it is simply not realistic to believe that the skills that we acquire at the beginning of our lives in our education, what we tend to think of as a period of our education will serve us throughout a working life. I mean, the shelf life of skills acquired at the beginning is a lot shorter than working life is going to be.”

Also Read: A Quarter Of U.S. Jobs To Be Affected By Advancement Of A.I.

Ryder notes the future number of jobs or the future of employment will not be determined alone by the autonomous forward march of technology. He says that will depend on the choices of policymakers.

The commission study indicates it is reasonable to assume that humans and robots will be able to live in harmony with one another — if humans are put in control of the forward application of technology. (VOA)

Next Story

World’s First Green Concrete Being Used in a Road Trial in Sydney

Projects like this geopolymer trial can result in new products that make a real difference in slashing carbon emissions

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World, Green, Concrete
Nine sensors have been positioned under the concrete to monitor. Pixabay

 In a world’s first, ‘green’ concrete” which is made using industrial waste from coal-fired power stations and steel manufacturing is being used in a road trial in Sydney.

Researchers from the University of New South Wales, Sydney and research and innovation hub called CRC for Low Carbon Living (CRCLCL) would use results from the trial to create the first set of industry guidelines for “geopolymer” concrete.

Nine sensors have been positioned under the concrete to monitor and compare how the ‘geopolymer’ concrete performs.

“Projects like this geopolymer trial can result in new products that make a real difference in slashing carbon emissions.

World, Green, Concrete
CRC for Low Carbon Living (CRCLCL) would use results. Pixabay

“Local governments are responsible for maintaining local roads, so if we can purchase more environmentally sustainable materials, we can fight climate change,” said Lord Mayor Clover Moore.

Made from fly ash and blast furnace slag, ‘geopolymer’ generates just 300 kgs of CO2 per tonne of cement, compared with the 900 km from traditional cement production — saving the equivalent of the electricity used by an average household every two weeks.

The low-CO2 concrete has the potential to put the 400 million cubic tonnes of globally documented waste from the coal and steel industries to good use.

UNSW Sydney researchers will monitor the road performance for up to five years.

Also Read- Australia’s State of Victory, The First in the Country to Leagalize Euthanasia for the Terminally Ill

“Research into geopolymer has been undertaken since the ’90s, but it’s only now that it’s starting to be commercialised,” said Professor Stephen Foster, Head of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UNSW Sydney.

Concrete contributes 7 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions and in 2018, the world produced about 4.1 billion tonnes of cement which contributed about 3.5 billion tonnes of CO2.

“Low-CO2 concrete materials offer potential benefits in reducing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional concrete,” said Professor Foster. (IANS)