Tuesday September 24, 2019

ADHD increases chances of eating disorder in children, says research

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Children’s Centre have found that children suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have a higher possibility of having Loss Of Control Eating Syndrome (LOC-ES).

Although the children with ADHD lose weight because of stimulant drugs, the disorder is usually associated with obesity, study leader Shauna P Reinblatt, assistant professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said.

The obesity in children with ADHD is being attributed to a link between the hallmark impulsivity of ADHD and loss of control over appetite and food consumption.

The study included 79 children between the ages of 8 to 14 from Baltimore area. Researchers based their relation between ADHD and LOC-ES on interviews, parental reports and objective measures. The children also underwent neuropsychological testing to measure how well they were able to control their impulses.

The study found that the chances of LOC-ES in children suffering from ADHD were increased 12 times as compared to those without ADHD. On the other hand, children suffering from LOC-ES were at a risk of having ADHD 7 times higher than others.

It was also found that the children with ADHD suffering from LOC-ES have a more severe form of ADHD streaked by more impulsive behavior that particularly manifests in their eating patterns, Dr. Reinblatt said.

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Heart Disease, Stroke-related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity: Study

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes

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India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries and are even increasing in some countries, reveals a new study.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Melbourne analysed trends in cardiovascular disease mortality, which consists of mainly heart disease and stroke — in 23 high-income countries since the year 2000.

The study found that cardiovascular disease mortality rates for people aged 35 to 74 years are now barely declining, or are increasing, in 12 of the 23 countries.

Cardiovascular disease mortality rates have increased in the most recent years in US and Canadian females, while in Australia, the UK and New Zealand annual declines in deaths from cardiovascular diseases are now 20 to 50 per cent.

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Two women converse in New York, June 26, 2012. The nation’s obesity epidemic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. Obesity is one of the risk factors of heart failure. VOA

“Research suggests that obesity, or at least poor diet, may have been a significant contributor to the slowdown in the decline of cardiovascular disease deaths,” said Alan Lopez, Professor at the University of Melbourne.

“Each of these countries have very high levels of obesity. In Australia, close to one-third of adults are obese,” Lopez said.

Also Read: Google Fit Can Now Track Users’ Sleep Patterns

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

“Failure to address these issues could confirm the end of the long-term decline in cardiovascular disease deaths and threaten future gains in life expectancy.” concluded study’s co-author Tim Adair, a researcher at the varsity. (IANS)