Thursday June 20, 2019

ADHD increases chances of eating disorder in children, says research

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Children’s Centre have found that children suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have a higher possibility of having Loss Of Control Eating Syndrome (LOC-ES).

Although the children with ADHD lose weight because of stimulant drugs, the disorder is usually associated with obesity, study leader Shauna P Reinblatt, assistant professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said.

The obesity in children with ADHD is being attributed to a link between the hallmark impulsivity of ADHD and loss of control over appetite and food consumption.

The study included 79 children between the ages of 8 to 14 from Baltimore area. Researchers based their relation between ADHD and LOC-ES on interviews, parental reports and objective measures. The children also underwent neuropsychological testing to measure how well they were able to control their impulses.

The study found that the chances of LOC-ES in children suffering from ADHD were increased 12 times as compared to those without ADHD. On the other hand, children suffering from LOC-ES were at a risk of having ADHD 7 times higher than others.

It was also found that the children with ADHD suffering from LOC-ES have a more severe form of ADHD streaked by more impulsive behavior that particularly manifests in their eating patterns, Dr. Reinblatt said.

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Researchers Identify Gene Linked to Obesity in Children

Approximately 70 per cent of the human population carries at least one variant of this polymorphism, which is associated with an increased risk of obesity

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Researchers have identified a common gene variant that increases the risk of obesity in children.
In a study published in Obesity journal, the researchers from University of Columbia found that a specific variant (single nucleotide polymorphism) of a gene called “FTO” affects eating behaviour that may be predictive of subsequent weight gain in children, who are at obesity risk.
“Early identification of the physiology and behaviours that constitute early risk factors for subsequent weight gain will help inform best practices for intervention and prevention of obesity in children,” said study author Michael Rosenbaum, a professor at Columbia University.
“This study shows that even before the development of an obese phenotype, children at risk, in this case by virtue of a common genetic variant, exhibit increased food intake,” added Rosenbaum.
For the study, the researchers included 122 children in the 5-10 year age group.
Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
Obesity can now be cured by our body’s natural weighing scales.
The study discovered that children who are at risk of obesity due to this genetic variant had an increased calorie intake which may contribute to gaining excess weight.
“Even though 65 calories is not a lot per se, if this pattern generalized to multiple meals per week or day, this increased caloric intake can add up over time and may contribute to gaining excess weight,” said Rosenbaum.
According to the researchers, the report could be used to further study children at obesity risk for other reasons.
“The ultimate goal is to prevent the at-risk child or the child who has obesity from becoming an adult with obesity,” added Rosenbaum.
Approximately 70 per cent of the human population carries at least one variant of this polymorphism, which is associated with an increased risk of obesity. (IANS)