Sunday February 17, 2019
Home Opinion AESDPC to ‘Go...

AESDPC to ‘Go Green’ for Durga Puja

0
//

By Debashish Gupta

New Delhi: To contain water pollution resulting from immersion of idols, the Ashoka Enclave Durga Puja Committee (AESDPC) is taking an initiative to express environmental commitments by celebrating Durgotsav on ‘Go Green’ concept this year.

credit: www.nailsbeautiqued.com
credit: www.nailsbeautiqued.com

Idol immersion activities during certain festival occasions are adding to the pollution load of the water- bodies. Non-biodegradable materials and synthetic paints used for making these idols are posing serious threat to aquatic life and environment.

Being a multi-cultural country of myriad festivals, most people participate in the celebrations of various deities round the year and it seems quite impossible to remain aloof from the accompanied pomp and show while paying homage to the gods. Some of these festivals involve ‘idol immersion’ in water as the celebrations’ finale. Beautifully carved and decorated idols are immersed into water bodies like rivers, ponds and lakes with prayers for success, happiness and peace. Two major festivals in India that involve idol immersion are ‘Ganesh Chaturthi’, dedicated to Lord Ganesha and ‘Durga Puja’, dedicated to Goddess Durga. The government seems to be contemplating a ban on idol immersions. However the mission of ‘Clean India’ is not solely the government’s burden; rather it is a shared responsibility of every individual citizen and a community as a whole.

Team AESDPC aims to contribute its bit to the environment and have planned to craft an idol simply with the help of clay and natural colors. There will be no use of any chemical colors, cloth or artificial ornaments and weapon, which increase the pollution levels of Yamuna. Through the move, AESDPC wish to take this celebration to a whole new level that is not only graceful and vibrant, but also environment-friendly.

 

Next Story

Rajasthan’s Leading Properties Go Green To Follow The Sustainable Route

Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

0
Famous Forts in India
Amer fort, Jaipur, Rajasthan (Pic Credits : Elene Machaidze)

From plastic straws to copper vessels, handmade lamps and bangles, Rajasthan’s leading hospitality players here are establishing new trends by engaging local artisans to showcase traditional artistry to guests and serving them locally-inspired cuisine amid green surroundings.

“We have initiated the use of paper-made straws; there is no use of plastic bags anywhere in the hotel property and the local-inspired food is being served to guests to ensure the locals have a regular source of income,” Binny Sebastian, General Manager, Bishangarh’s Alila Fort heritage hotel, some 50 km from here, told IANS.

Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

organic farming
Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

“Our association with the locals is quite strong. Working with them, we take our guests to the local temple. They also visit the artisans’ houses and sip tea there while watching them make pottery and weave carpet. In this way, we ensure that locals get a decent livelihood,” Sebastian added.

“We have started getting regular income since this property came up a year back. We have been showing our art to the guests here which gives us satisfaction as well as an income,” said Nizamuddin, a bangle maker.

Ashok S. Rathore, General Manager of the Rambagh Palace, said: “We have curtailed the use of plastic. There are no plastic straws being used on the property. We serve in glass bottles instead of plastic water bottles.”

This property is also adopting sustainable routes to ensure that the locals get decent income opportunities for their sustenance.

Famous forts in India
Chittorgarh Fort, Rajasthan (Wikimedia Commons)

“Our interiors are reminiscent of handmade interiors. Our suites are adorned with Thikri art, a rare gold-dipped miniature artwork of Rajasthan. But skilled artists are disappearing and it comes with a high cost of production,” said Rathore.

Also Read: Stop “Stereotyping” Northeast, States Hold Strong Cultural Harmony

Fairmont Jaipur has incorporated the fine craftsmanship and beauty of the local cultural heritage and artisans of Jaipur. The ceilings are hand-painted by local artisans with complex motifs.

“We associate with the local artisans to showcase their talent at the hotel in the form of the evening entertainment, the welcome experience and celebrate the local heritage of Rajasthan,” said Srijan Vadhera, General Manager, Fairmont Jaipur. (IANS)