Friday December 14, 2018
Home World African Eleph...

African Elephant Poaching Crisis is not only bad for Elephants, it’s bad for Tourism: Study

Anywhere from 20,000 to 30,000 African elephants are killed each year to feed the illegal ivory trade, which is fueled predominantly by demand in China

0
//
Elephants are seen in in Tsavo East National Park, Kenya, April 20, 2016. VOA
Republish
Reprint

November 05, 2016: The African elephant poaching crisis is not only bad for elephants, it’s bad for tourism, according to a new study.

Writing in the journal Nature Communications, researchers from the University of Vermont, the World Wildlife Fund and the University of Cambridge say poaching the majestic beasts costs African countries about $25 million in tourism revenue.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

[bctt tweet=”The revenue lost from poaching “exceeds the anti-poaching costs necessary to stop the decline” in elephant populations in Africa.” username=””]

“While there have always been strong moral and ethical reasons for conserving elephants, not everyone shares this viewpoint. Our research now shows that investing in elephant conservation is actually smart economic policy for many African countries,” said Dr. Robin Naidoo, lead wildlife scientist at WWF and lead author on the study.

Elephant
A ranger from the Kenya Wildlife Service stands guard near stacks of ivory in Nairobi National Park, Kenya, April 28, 2016. VOA

According to the researchers, this is the “first continent-wide assessment of the economic losses the current elephant poaching surge is inflicting on nature-based tourism economies in Africa.”

Anywhere from 20,000 to 30,000 African elephants are killed each year to feed the illegal ivory trade, which is fueled predominantly by demand in China. Elephant populations in the region have declined by more than 20 percent during the past 10 years.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“We know that within parks, tourism suffers when elephant poaching ramps up. This work provides a first estimate of the scale of that loss, and shows pretty convincingly that stronger conservation efforts usually make sound economic sense even when looking at just this one benefit stream,” said study co-author Professor Andrew Balmford, from the University of Cambridge’s Department of Zoology.

The study also showed the revenue lost from poaching “exceeds the anti-poaching costs necessary to stop the decline” in elephant populations.

Researchers say the return on investment with conservation is “positive.”

“The average rate of return on elephant conservation in east, west, and south Africa compares favorably with rates of return on investments in areas like education, food security and electricity,” said Dr. Brendan Fisher, an economist at University of Vermont’s Gund Institute for Ecological Economics. “For example, for every dollar invested in protecting elephants in East Africa, you get about $1.78 back. That’s a great deal.”

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

Researchers cautioned the same return on investment is not seen in central Africa because of the denser foliage, which makes it harder for would-be tourists to see wildlife. (VOA)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

USA: Everything you want to know about Security Clearance; Find out here!

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

0
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

Also Read: Governments Across The World Request Apple for 30,000 Device Information

Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)