Tuesday December 10, 2019

AI Can Help To Identify if you Will Die Within a Year or Not

Study by researchers found that AI-based models can analyse ECG test results and pinpoint patients at higher risk of developing a potentially dangerous irregular heartbeat

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Researchers found that AI can examine ECG test results, to predict irregular heartbeat and the death risk. Pixabay

After looking at standard ECG tests, Artificial Intelligence also known as AI can help identify patients most likely to die of any medical cause within a year, claim researchers.

To reach this conclusion, researchers from Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania analyzed the results of 1.77 million ECGs and other records from almost 400,000 patients.

The team used this data to compare machine learning-based models that either directly analyzed the raw ECG signals or relied on aggregated human-derived measures (standard ECG features typically recorded by a cardiologist) and commonly diagnosed disease patterns.

The neural network model that directly analyzed the ECG signals was found to be superior for predicting one-year risk of death. Surprisingly, the neural network was able to accurately predict risk of death even in patients deemed by a physician to have a normal ECG.

Three cardiologists separately reviewed the ECGs that had first been read as normal, and they were generally unable to recognize the risk patterns that the neural network detected, researchers said.

“This is the most important finding of this study. This could completely alter the way we interpret ECGs in the future,” said Brandon Fornwalt, chair of the Department of Imaging Science and Innovation at Geisinger in Danville, Pennsylvania.

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After looking at standard ECG tests, Artificial Intelligence also known as AI can help identify patients most likely to die of any medical cause within a year, claim researchers. Pixabay

Another study by the same group of researchers found that AI-based models can analyse ECG test results and pinpoint patients at higher risk of developing a potentially dangerous irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia).

The team used more than two million ECG results from more than three decades of archived medical records in Pennsylvania/New Jersey’s Geisinger Health System to train deep neural networks.

They found that Artificial intelligence can examine ECG test results, to predict irregular heartbeat and the death risk, according to the two preliminary studies to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 in Philadelphia from November 16-18.
While the vast Geisinger database is a key strength of both studies, the findings should be tested at sites outside of Geisinger, the researchers noted.

“Incorporating these models into routine ECG analysis would be simple. However, developing appropriate care plans for patients based on computer predictions would be a bigger challenge,” said lead author Sushravya Raghunath.

Both studies are among the first to use AI to predict future events from an ECG rather than to detect current health problems.

“This is exciting and provides more evidence that we are on the verge of a revolution in medicine where computers will be working alongside physicians to improve patient care,” said Fornwalt.

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The neural network model that directly analyzed the ECG signals was found to be superior for predicting one-year risk of death as AI. Pixabay

Atrial fibrillation is associated with higher risk of stroke and heart attack.

Jennifer Hall, the American Heart Association Chief of the Institute for Precision Cardiovascular Medicine, said that deep learning is “terrific as another way for us in our field of cardiovascular medicine to be able to help patients and help those understand the risk of stroke.”

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“Having these techniques at our fingertips and having more precise techniques to uncover potential atrial fibrillation now or in the future, is absolutely tremendous,” Hall noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Global Warming Can Make You Fall ill More Often: Study

The study said that increased heat may cause illness through undernourishment in a number of ways: reducing appetites, provoking more alcohol consumption, reducing motivation or ability to shop and cook and exacerbate any undernutrition

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Global Warming is one of the biggest threats to the reduction of hunger and undernutrition, especially in low and middle-income countries. Pixabay

Global Warming is likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure, researchers have warned.

For the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, the researhers analysed daily hospitalisation data covering almost 80 per cent of Brazil between 2000 and 2015.

They studied the link between daily mean temperatures and hospitalisation for undernourishment according to the International Classification of Diseases.

“The association between increased heat and hospitalisation for undernutrition was greatest for individuals aged over 80, and those 5 to 19 years,” said the researchers from Monash University, Australia.

The researchers found that for every 1 degree Celsius increase in daily mean temperature during the hot season, there was a 2.5 per cent increase in the number of hospitalisations for undernutrition.

“We estimated that 15.6 per cent of undernutrition hospitalisations could be attributed to heat exposure during the study period,” said study’s lead author Yuming Guo.

Global Warming
Global Warming is likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure, researchers have warned. Pixabay

The study said that increased heat may cause illness through undernourishment in a number of ways: reducing appetites, provoking more alcohol consumption, reducing motivation or ability to shop and cook and exacerbate any undernutrition, resulting in hospitalisation.

“Climate change is one of the biggest threats to the reduction of hunger and undernutrition, especially in low and middle-income countries. It has been estimated that climate change will reduce global food availability by 3.2 per cent and thus cause about 30,000 underweight-related deaths by 2050,” the report said.

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“It is plausible to speculate that climate changes could not only increase the rate of undernutrition in the most affected areas of the globe, but at the same time, impair individuals’ capacity to adapt to projected rises in temperature,” said the researchers. (IANS)