Monday October 22, 2018

AI Outwits Doctors at Detecting Skin Cancer

It can be cured if detected early, but many cases are only diagnosed when the cancer is more advanced and harder to treat

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Previous research has shown that obesity and high-fat diets both together and independently increase the risk of pancreatic cancer.
Previous research has shown that obesity and high-fat diets both together and independently increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. Pixabay
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An Artificial Intelligence (AI) system has been found to detect skin cancer more accurately than a group of experienced dermatologists from 17 countries around the world, a study said on Tuesday.

In the experiment, the team of researchers from Germany, France and the US trained a form of AI or Machine Learning known as a deep learning convolutional neural network (CNN) to identify skin cancer by showing it more than 100,000 images of malignant melanomas — the most lethal form of skin cancer — as well as harmless moles.

When its performance was compared with that of 58 international dermatologists, the CNN missed fewer melanomas and misdiagnosed benign moles less often as malignant than the group of dermatologists, showed the findings published in the journal Annals of Oncology.

“The CNN works like the brain of a child. To train it, we showed the CNN more than 100,000 images of malignant and benign skin cancers and moles and indicated the diagnosis for each image,” said first author of the study Professor Holger Haenssle from the University of Heidelberg in Germany.

“Only dermoscopic images were used, that is lesions that were imaged at a 10-fold magnification. With each training image, the CNN improved its ability to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions,” Haenssle added.

Representational image (AI)
Representational image (AI). Pixabay

A CNN is an artificial neural network inspired by the biological processes at work when nerve cells (neurons) in the brain are connected to each other and respond to what the eye sees.

The CNN is capable of learning fast from images that it “sees” and teaching itself from what it has learned to improve its performance — a process known as Machine Learning.

“These findings show that deep learning convolutional neural networks are capable of out-performing dermatologists, including extensively trained experts, in the task of detecting melanomas,” Haenssle said.

The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing, with an estimated 232,000 new cases worldwide and around 55,500 deaths from the disease each year.

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It can be cured if detected early, but many cases are only diagnosed when the cancer is more advanced and harder to treat.

But despite the promising results from the experiment, the researchers do not envisage that the CNN would take over from dermatologists in diagnosing skin cancers, but that it could be used as an additional aid.

“This CNN may serve physicians involved in skin cancer screening as an aid in their decision whether to biopsy a lesion or not,” Haenssle said. (IANS)

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Samsung to Develop AI-Enabled Multi-Device System

Samsung is now planning to expand its AI research centres to other technology and talent-rich areas

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Samsung planning to develop AI-powered multi-device system. Flickr

With Artificial Intelligence (AI) pushing the frontiers of communication technology, Samsung Electronics is planning to develop a multi-device platform — a variety of AI-enabled devices that communicate seamlessly with each other — to make experiences more personal and relevant.

The South Korean tech giant presented its future vision for AI while announcing this week a new AI centre in Montreal, Canada.

“By leveraging the power of AI in Samsung’s products and services, we must focus on creating new values, never seen nor experienced before,” said Seunghwan Cho, Executive Vice President of Samsung Research.

By providing multiple touchpoints where a user can interact with AI, Samsung said its multi-modal interaction platform (voice, vision, screen, touch) will make experiences more relevant and personal in the future.

“One key element that will move AI to being more widely adopted is multi-device systems — i.e., a variety of AI-enabled devices that communicate seamlessly with each other,” said Larry Heck, Head of AI Centres for Samsung Research America.

“Samsung is uniquely positioned to be a leader in this regard. It’s not just how each device uses AI, it’s how they use it together,” Heck said.

Samsung
The South Korean tech giant presented its future vision for AI while announcing this week a new AI centre in Montreal, Canada.

The newly opened AI centre in Montreal is Samsung’s seventh AI research facility to open this year making it the fourth in North America alone.

The global AI centres, which are also located in South Korea, Russia and Britain, support the company’s efforts in AI that include the development of Samsung’s virtual assistant, Bixby.

Gregory Dudek of the McGill University School of Computer Science and an expert in a wide range of AI technologies — from Machine Learning to human-robot interactions — will lead the Montreal AI Centre.

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“We are excited to open a new Samsung AI Centre in Montreal, which will conduct research in machine learning and robotics enabled multi-modal interactions,” Dudek said.

Samsung is now planning to expand its AI research centres to other technology and talent-rich areas.

Earlier this year, the company announced its plans to expand the number of advanced AI researchers to a total of about 1,000 globally by 2020. (IANS)