Wednesday March 20, 2019

This AI Tool May Accelerate Diagnosis Of Eye Diseases, Pneumonia

Besides eye diseases, the tool was able to differentiate between viral and bacterial childhood pneumonia with greater than 90 percent accuracy

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The researchers also used occlusion testing, which allowed them to show areas of greatest importance when reviewing the scan images. Pixabay

A novel image-based diagnostic tool, developed using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning techniques, may potentially speed up diagnoses and treatment of patients with retinal diseases and pneumonia among children, researchers say.

The findings showed that the new tool uses big data and AI to not only recognize two of the most common retinal diseases — macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema — but also to rate their severity.

“Macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema are the two most common causes of irreversible blindness but are both very treatable if they are caught early,” said Kang Zhang, Professor at the University of California-San Diego.

ALSO READ: Is Your Child Avoiding Eye Contact? He May Be Anxious, Says New Study

“Deciding how and when to treat patients has historically been handled by a small community of specialists who require years of training and are concentrated mostly in urban areas.”

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It can also distinguish between bacterial and viral pneumonia in children based on chest x-ray images. IANS

“In contrast, our AI tool can be used anywhere in the world, especially in the rural areas. This is important in places like India, China, and Africa, where there are relatively fewer medical resources,” Zhang said.

For the study, published in the journal Cell, the team studied over 200,000 optical coherence tomography (OCT) images using a technique called transfer learning, where knowledge gained in solving one problem is stored by a computer and applied to different but related problems.

“Machine learning is often like a black box where we don’t know exactly what is happening,” Zhang said.

The researchers then compared the diagnoses from the computer with those from ophthalmologists who reviewed the scans.

ALSO READ: Chronic Diseases Raise Cancer and Mortality Risk

The results showed that the tool “could generate a decision on whether or not the patient should be referred for treatment within 30 seconds and with more than 95 percent accuracy”, Zhang said.

Besides eye diseases, the tool was able to differentiate between viral and bacterial childhood pneumonia with greater than 90 percent accuracy.

It can also discern between cancerous and non-cancerous lesions detected on scans, Zhang said. (IANS)

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Microsoft Announces a Business School in Artificial Intelligence

However, very few are using AI across their organisation and identifying business opportunities and problems that AI can address

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A man walks past a Microsoft sign set up for the Microsoft BUILD conference at Moscone Center in San Francisco, April 28, 2015. VOA
Microsoft on Monday announced a business school in Artificial Intelligence (AI) that will help companies improve decision-making in integrating AI across their operations.
INSEAD, a graduate business school with campuses in Europe, Asia and the Middle East, partnered with Microsoft to build the AI Business School’s strategy module, which includes case studies about companies across many industries that have successfully transformed their businesses with AI, the company said in a statement.
A series of short introductory videos provide an overview of the AI technologies driving change across industries, but the bulk of the content focuses on managing the impact of AI on company strategy, culture and responsibility, the company said in a statement.
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Logo of Microsoft outside it’s office. Pixabay
“There is a gap between what people want to do and the reality of what is going on in their organisations today, and the reality of whether their organisation is ready,” said Mitra Azizirad, Corporate Vice President for AI marketing at Microsoft in Redmond, Washington.
“This school is a deep dive into how you develop a strategy and identify blockers before they happen in the implementation of AI in your organisation,” she added.
According to Nick McQuire, analyst with market research firm CCS Insight, more than 50 per cent of the companies his firm has surveyed are already either researching, trialling or implementing specific projects with AI and machine learning.
However, very few are using AI across their organisation and identifying business opportunities and problems that AI can address, he added. (IANS)