Wednesday October 24, 2018

Novel AI Tool May help to Predict Alzheimer’s risk

Globally, around 50 million people have dementia and the total number is projected to reach 82 million in 2030 and 152 in 2050, according to the World Health Organization

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New AI tool can predict Alzheimer's risk. Pixabay
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A team of scientists, including one of an Indian-origin, has successfully trained a new Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithm that may soon help doctors to make accurate predictions regarding cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer’s disease and provide intervention.

The team, from the McGill University in Canada, designed an algorithm that learns signatures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetics, and clinical data.

This specific algorithm can help predict whether an individual’s cognitive faculties are likely to deteriorate towards Alzheimer’s in the next five years.

“At the moment, there are limited ways to treat Alzheimer’s and the best evidence we have is for prevention. Our AI methodology could have significant implications as a ‘doctor’s assistant’ that would help stream people onto the right pathway for treatment,” Mallar Chakravarty, assistant professor at the University’s Department of Psychiatry.

“For example, one could even initiate lifestyle changes that may delay the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s or even prevent it altogether,” she added.

Alzheimer's
In Alzheimer’s disease, patients start losing memory, Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology, the team trained their algorithms using data from more than 800 people ranging from normal healthy seniors to those experiencing mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer’s disease patients.

“We are currently working on testing the accuracy of predictions using new data. It will help us to refine predictions and determine if we can predict even farther into the future,” Chakravarty noted.

With more data, doctors would be able to better identify those in the population at greatest risk for cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer’s.

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Globally, around 50 million people have dementia and the total number is projected to reach 82 million in 2030 and 152 in 2050, according to the World Health Organization.

Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, may contribute to 60-70% of cases. Presently, there is no truly effective treatment for this disease. (IANS)

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Samsung to Develop AI-Enabled Multi-Device System

Samsung is now planning to expand its AI research centres to other technology and talent-rich areas

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Samsung planning to develop AI-powered multi-device system. Flickr

With Artificial Intelligence (AI) pushing the frontiers of communication technology, Samsung Electronics is planning to develop a multi-device platform — a variety of AI-enabled devices that communicate seamlessly with each other — to make experiences more personal and relevant.

The South Korean tech giant presented its future vision for AI while announcing this week a new AI centre in Montreal, Canada.

“By leveraging the power of AI in Samsung’s products and services, we must focus on creating new values, never seen nor experienced before,” said Seunghwan Cho, Executive Vice President of Samsung Research.

By providing multiple touchpoints where a user can interact with AI, Samsung said its multi-modal interaction platform (voice, vision, screen, touch) will make experiences more relevant and personal in the future.

“One key element that will move AI to being more widely adopted is multi-device systems — i.e., a variety of AI-enabled devices that communicate seamlessly with each other,” said Larry Heck, Head of AI Centres for Samsung Research America.

“Samsung is uniquely positioned to be a leader in this regard. It’s not just how each device uses AI, it’s how they use it together,” Heck said.

Samsung
The South Korean tech giant presented its future vision for AI while announcing this week a new AI centre in Montreal, Canada.

The newly opened AI centre in Montreal is Samsung’s seventh AI research facility to open this year making it the fourth in North America alone.

The global AI centres, which are also located in South Korea, Russia and Britain, support the company’s efforts in AI that include the development of Samsung’s virtual assistant, Bixby.

Gregory Dudek of the McGill University School of Computer Science and an expert in a wide range of AI technologies — from Machine Learning to human-robot interactions — will lead the Montreal AI Centre.

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“We are excited to open a new Samsung AI Centre in Montreal, which will conduct research in machine learning and robotics enabled multi-modal interactions,” Dudek said.

Samsung is now planning to expand its AI research centres to other technology and talent-rich areas.

Earlier this year, the company announced its plans to expand the number of advanced AI researchers to a total of about 1,000 globally by 2020. (IANS)

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