Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×

Scientists have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) tool for detecting unfair discrimination — such as on the basis of race or gender.

Preventing unfair treatment of individuals on the basis of race, gender or ethnicity, for example, has been a long-standing concern of civilised societies.


However, detecting such discrimination resulting from decisions, whether by human decision makers or automated AI systems, can be extremely challenging.

“Artificial intelligence systems — such as those involved in selecting candidates for a job or for admission to a university — are trained on large amounts of data,” said Vasant Honavar, a professor at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) in the US.

“But if these data are biased, they can affect the recommendations of AI systems,” Honavar said.

He said if a company historically has never hired a woman for a particular type of job, then an AI system trained on this historical data will not recommend a woman for a new job.

“There’s nothing wrong with the machine learning algorithm itself,” said Honavar.

“It’s doing what it’s supposed to do, which is to identify good job candidates based on certain desirable characteristics. But since it was trained on historical, biased data it has the potential to make unfair recommendations,” he said.

The team created an AI tool for detecting discrimination with respect to a protected attribute, such as race or gender, by human decision makers or AI systems.


“Artificial intelligence is now one of the fastest-growing areas in all of science and one of the most talked-about topics in society.” VOA

“We can minimise gender-based discrimination in salary if we ensure that similar men and women receive similar salaries,” said Aria Khademi, graduate student at Penn State.

The researchers tested their method using various types of available data, such as income data from the US Census Bureau to determine whether there is gender-based discrimination in salaries.

They also tested their method using the New York City Police Department’s stop-and-frisk programme data to determine whether there is discrimination against people of colour in arrests made after stops.

“We analysed an adult income data set containing salary, demographic and employment-related information for close to 50,000 individuals,” said Honavar.

“We found evidence of gender-based discrimination in salary. Specifically, we found that the odds of a woman having a salary greater than USD 50,000 per year is only one-third that for a man.

“This would suggest that employers should look for and correct, when appropriate, gender bias in salaries,” he said.

Also Read: Apple Releases Silent Update for Mac Users to Fix Faulty Video Conferencing App

Although the team’s analysis of the New York stop-and-frisk dataset — which contains demographic and other information about drivers stopped by the New York City police force — revealed evidence of possible racial bias against Hispanics and African American individuals, it found no evidence of discrimination against them on average as a group.

“You cannot correct for a problem if you don’t know that the problem exists,” said Honavar.

“To avoid discrimination on the basis of race, gender or other attributes you need effective tools for detecting discrimination. Our tool can help with that,” he said. (IANS)


Popular

Pexels

Narakasura's death is celebrated as 'Naraka Chaturdashi' popularly known as Choti Diwali

Diwali is arguably one of the most auspicious and celebrated holidays in South Asia. It is celebrated over the span of five days, where the third is considered most important and known as Diwali. During Diwali people come together to light, lamps, and diyas, savour sweet delicacies and pray to the lord. The day has various origin stories with the main them being the victory of good over evil. While the North celebrates the return of Lord Rama and Devi Sita to Ayodhya, the South rejoices in the victory of Lord Krishna and his consort Satyabhama over evil Narakasura.

Narakasura- The great mythical demon King

Naraka or Narakasur was the son of Bhudevi (Goddess Earth) and fathered either by the Varaha incarnation of Vishnu or Hiranyaksha. He grew to be a powerful demon king and became the legendary progenitor of all three dynasties of Pragjyotisha-Kamarupa, and the founding ruler of the legendary Bhauma dynasty of Pragjyotisha.

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia Commons

Safety-pins with charms

For all the great inventions that we have at hand, it is amazing how we keep going back to the safety pin every single time to fix everything. Be it tears in our clothes, to fix our broken things, to clean our teeth and nails when toothpicks are unavailable, to accessorize our clothes, and of course, as an integral part of the Indian saree. Safety pins are a must-have in our homes. But how did they come about at all?

The safety pin was invented at a time when brooches existed. They were used by the Greeks and Romans quite extensively. A man named Walter Hunt picked up a piece of brass and coiled it into the safety pin we know today. He did it just to pay off his debt. He even sold the patent rights of this seemingly insignificant invention just so that his debtors would leave him alone.

Keep Reading Show less
vaniensamayalarai

Sesame oil bath is also called ennai kuliyal in Tamil

In South India, Deepavali marks the end of the monsoon and heralds the start of winter. The festival is usually observed in the weeks following heavy rain, and just before the first cold spell in the peninsula. The light and laughter that comes with the almost week-long celebration are certainly warm to the bones, but there is still a tradition that the South Indians follow to ease their transition from humidity to the cold.

Just before the main festival, the family bathes in sesame oil. This tradition is called 'yellu yennai snaana' in Kannada, or 'ennai kuliyal' in Tamil, which translates to 'sesame oil bath'. The eldest member of the family applies three drops of heated oil on each member's head. They must massage this oil into their hair and body. The oil is allowed to soak in for a while, anywhere between twenty minutes to an hour. After this, they must wash with warm water before sunrise.

Keep reading... Show less